Division of Mathematics and Sciences

Biology

BIO 100  Intro to Anatomy/Physiology    3 sem. hrs.

The Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology course will study the shape, structure, and function of the human body and its parts. Content includes: basic anatomy and directional terminology, structure and function of body systems, fundamental concepts and principles of body organization. A grade of C- or better is required to enroll in BIO 209. The credits from this course do not count toward the requirements for science or pre-nursing/nursing majors. 3 one-hour lecturesper week. Offered every fall semester.

BIO 101  T1:Principles of Biology I    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the concept of scientific inquiry, the nature, history and place of science in human endeavor. It probes the makeup of living systems the lifecycles and interdependence of organisms and natural and unnatural hazards to life and development. Focuses are on cell biology, cellular structure and function, energy metabolism, photo synthesis, membrane structure and function, DNA and RNA, and proteins. Mitosis, meiosis, classical genetics and modern DNA technology,genetics and modern DNA technology are covered. 3 one-hour lectures per week. Offered every fall semester.

BIO 101L  Principles of Biology I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Students perform investigative experiments using the scientific method to explore the concepts of cells, enzymes, water relations, respiration, and photosynthesis. They explore the concepts of microevolution and macroevolution using simulations and computer models. One three-hour lab per week. Offered every fall semester.

BIO 102  Principles of Biology II    3 sem. hrs.

This course presents the history of the earth, structure and function of living things while looking at the regulation and behavior of living things and investigating scientific questions and concepts. An understanding of the unifying themes in the biological sciences and an overview of the variety of life on earth are presented. Topics include: cell biology, mechanisms of speciation and evolution, the evidence for evolution, taxonomy, viruses, prokaryotes, and a survey of the eukaryotic world, including animals, plants, fungi, algae and protozoans. Three hours of lecture per week. Offered every spring semester.

BIO 102L  Principles of Biology II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Students learn the principles of classification and identification of organisms.They will explore the diversity of prokaryotes and eukaryotes through the study of preserved and living specimens. They will use computer simulations to model ecological and evolutionary concepts. One three-hour lab per week. Offered every spring semester.

BIO 120  Intro to Bioinformatics    3 sem. hrs.

Bioinformatics is the application of computer power to problems in Biology and medicine. This course provides an introduction to the problems addressed by the cross-disciplinary field of bioinformatics, and to some of the tools made available by this technology. Students will use bioinformatics to investigate genome organization, gene structure, and the four levels of protein structure. Students are introduced to molecular visualization tools, sequence analysis software, and on-linesequence comparison tools. A short paper is required, investigating aparticular gene, its product, the structure of the product, and its function in the cell. Three one-hour lectures per week. Cross-listed as CS 120. Offered every fall semester.

BIO 200  Medical Terminology    1 sem. hr.

This course introduces students to an extensive list of commonly used terms in medicine. Emphasis is placed on learning the Latin and/or Greek language-based terms and their use in a wide array of technical language in medicine and science. Offered every fall and spring semester.

BIO 203  Field Botany    4 sem. hrs.

Students become familiar with common plants of this region and with scientific methods of collecting, identifying, and cataloging plants in the field and herbarium. Also included are discussions of economically useful plants and geographic distribution of plants. Course is largely field work. Open to all students. Offered intermittently in the summer or fall semester.

BIO 206  Microbiology    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the student to microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, helminthes and viruses. Emphasis is placed on the structure and life processes of these microorganisms along with their role in causing human diseases and the host response to infectious diseases. Offered every fall and spring semester and usually in summer.

Prerequisites: Students must have earned a C- or higher grade in either BIO 101-102 or BIO 209-210 and CHEM 101-102 or CHEM 109-110 prior to taking this course.

BIO 206L  Microbiology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Students examine the microscopic and macroscopic structure of microorganisms.Students learn basic laboratory techniques including gram staining, plate streaking, methods for quantifying microorganisms, and biochemical/immunological tests needed to identify microorganisms. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. Offered every fall and spring semester and usually in summer.

Prerequisites: Students must have earned a C- or higher grade in either BIO 101-102 or BIO 209-210 and CHEM 101-102 or CHEM 109-110 prior to taking this course.

BIO 209  Anatomy/Physiology I    3 sem. hrs.

This course is the first course of a two-semester sequence in which the structure and function of the human body are studied using a systemic approach. Three hr/week lecture sessions address primarily, though not exclusively, body function (physiology) while laboratory sessions address structure (anatomy). Topics include the basic anatomical and directional terminology; fundamental principles of cell biology; histology; the integumentary, skeletal, nervous (including special senses) and endocrine systems. Unifying themes, such as homeostasis are emphasizedthroughout both semesters. Offered every fall, spring and summer sessions.

Prerequisite: High school biology and chemistry.

BIO 209L  Anatomy/Physiology I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This course is the laboratory component of the anatomy and physiology course and is recommended to be taken concurrently with the BIO 209 lecture course. Laboratory sessions address primarily, though not exclusively, structure (anatomy), while lecture sessions address body function (physiology). It provides hands-on exploration of human anatomy and covers tissues, skeletal system, nervous system and special senses. The laboratory meets two hours per week. Offered every fall, spring, and summer sessions.

BIO 210  Anatomy/Physiology II    3 sem. hrs.

This course is the second course of a two-semester sequence in which the structure and function of the human body are studied using a systemic approach. Three hr/week lecture sessions address primarily, though not exclusively, body function (physiology) while laboratory sessions address structure (anatomy). Topics include the muscular, lymphatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems; metabolism; fluid/electrolyte /acid/base balance; development and inheritance. Unifying themes, such as homeostasis is emphasized throughout both semesters. Offered every fall, spring, and summer sessions.

Prerequisite: Successful completion ofBIO 209 or by permission.

BIO 210L  Anatomy/Physiology II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This course is the laboratory component of the anatomy and physiology course and is recommended to be taken concurrently with the BIO 210 lecture course. Laboratory sessions address primarily structure (anatomy), while lecture sessions address body function (physiology). It provides hands-on exploration of human anatomy through animal dissection with human cadavers as prosections. Topics include the muscular, lymphatic, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary andreproductive systems. Offered every fall, spring, and summer sessions.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of BIO 209L or bypermission.

BIO 280  Bioinformatics Seminar    1 sem. hr.

A one-credit course in which on-line genome databases will be explored. The course culminates with a project inquiring into some aspect of cell biology, drawing on bioinformatics tools made available by various databases, such as the human genome browsers at NCBI, EMBL, and UCSD, the OMIM and OMIA databases, and gene expression data from EST and microarray databases. Cross-listed as CS 280. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: BIO101-102.

BIO 290  Pathophysiology    3 sem. hrs.

Human physiology, as addressed through descriptions of human diseases and disorders. All major systems will be included. The normal functions of human systems and organs are made clear by study of their malfunctions. Intended for nursing majors. Offered every fall & spring semester.

Prerequisite: BIO 209-210.

BIO 301  Anat/Evol of Vertebrates    4 sem. hrs.

(Formerly Comparative Anatomy) Combined lecture and laboratory experience investigating the anatomy and phylogeny of vertebrates. The course is designed on a systems basis, including skeletal, respiratory, reproductive, etc. It also explores the development of different vertebrates and the connections between evolution and development. Three hours of lecture per week, with regular lab exercises as part of lecture time. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: BIO 102; BIO 209-210.

BIO 301L  Anat/Evol of Vertebrates: Lab    1 sem. hr.

BIO 302  Parasitology    3 sem. hrs.

This course offers a taxonomic-based introduction to the morphology, life-histories, and pathogenicity of common animal parasites with special emphasis on those affecting humans. The host immune response to parasitic infections and chemotherapies available to treat parasitic infections are discussed. Current journal articles are discussed. The course meets for three hours per week. Recommended: BIO 206. Offered fall semester on every even-numbered year.

Prerequisite: BIO 101-102.

BIO 302L  Parasitology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The laboratory compliments the lecture. Students study the life cycles of parasites and learn to recognize the intermediary and adult forms of parasites causing human disease. The vectors which spread the parasites are studied as well. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portion simultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Recommended: BIO 206. Offered fall semester on every even-numbered year.

Prerequisite: BIO 101-102.

BIO 303  Pathogenic Bacteriology    3 sem. hrs.

Course emphasizes major human bacterial pathogens and details the molecular mechanisms by which virulence factors contribute to disease. The host defense mechanisms against bacterial infections are examined. The prevention and treatment of bacterial infections are examined. Current journal articles are discussed. Three hours of lecture per week. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 206, BIO206L.

BIO 303L  Pathogenic Bacteriology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The laboratory compliments the lecture and examines case studies of bacterial infections and is offered simultaneously with BIO 304L. Techniques for handling and growing bacteria and for identifying pathogenic bacteria with emphasis on immunoassays are introduced in the lab. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portion simultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 206, BIO 206L.

BIO 304  Immunology    3 sem. hrs.

Introductory course describing the components and mechanisms involved in immune response. Diagnostic immunology and importance of clinical immunology in medicine are included. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 209, 210, CHEM 201, 202, or permission of instructor.

BIO 304L  Immunology Lab    1 sem. hr.

The laboratory focuses on the immunoassays used in the clinical laboratoryto identify pathogens and is offered simultaneously with BIO 303L. Students will learn techniques for handling and growing bacteria and for identifying pathogenic bacteria with emphasis on immunoassays in the lab. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portion simultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Recommended: BIO 206, 206L. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 209, 210, CHEM 201, 202.

BIO 305  Botany    4 sem. hrs.

This course begins looking at cell structure, general regulation and behavior along with the diversity and adaptations of plant organisms. Matter, energy and organizations in living plant life are also major considerations. A comprehensive understanding of plants, including anatomy and physiology, taxonomy, development and differentiation, photosynthesis, metabolism, morphology, life histories, and reproduction are followed. Four hours of lecture and lab per week. Students are expected to participate in several field trips outside of the scheduled class time. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102 or permission from instructor.

BIO 305L  Botany: Lab    1 sem. hr.

BIO 306  Cell Biology    3 sem. hrs.

This course emphasizes the cell as the basic unit of life in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. The course looks at the chemical nature of the macromolecules found in cells, the makeup and function of cellular organelles and the flow of energy in the cell. Life processes including transport across membranes, cellular movement, cell cycling, expression and regulation of cell genomes are examined. The lecture meets for three hours per week. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102 and CHEM 201, 202.

BIO 306L  Cell Biology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This laboratory experience is meant to compliment the lecture. The focus of the laboratory is to analyze the macromolecules in cells by chemical and immunological assays. The laboratory meets for three hours per week. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portion simultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Offered at the discretion of the Division.

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102 and CHEM 201, 202.

BIO 307  Essential Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

(See Chemistry 307). Offered every spring semester.

BIO 307L  Essential Biochemistry:Lab    1 sem. hr.

BIO 309  Human Physiology    4 sem. hrs.

An upper-level course emphasizing the interactions between the complex components of physiological systems. Course reinforces foundations in physiology that are important for students in the medically related sciences. Students will develop active learning skills through problem solving and experimentation. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites: BIO 209, 210 or permission of instructor.

BIO 314  General Ecology    3 sem. hrs.

Course provides an understanding of interrelationships of plants and animals to each other and to their physical environment, including how soil, temperature, light, water, and other environmental factors affect geographical distribution of plants and animals. Students are expected to participate in several field trips. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: one biology or natural science course.

BIO 315  Field Botany    4 sem. hrs.

Students become familiar with a diversity of plants in the field and with scientific methods of collecting, identifying, and cataloging plants. Also included are discussions of ecological and morphological adaptations of plants to their environment and geographic distribution of plants as it relates to geology and climatology. Course is largely field work and may include overnight stays. Offered in the summer.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102.

BIO 320  Biochemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the chemistry of biological compounds that include amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and nucleic acids with an emphasis on their structure-function relationships. Protein structure and biosynthesis, enzymes kinetics and mechanisms, and biological membranes are covered in detail. This course is required for Biochemistry majors and most pre-pharmacy students. All pre-professional students, biology majors and chemistry majors are welcome to enroll. Cross-listed as CHEM 320. Offered every fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201, 202 with labs.

BIO 320L  Biochemistry I:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This laboratory course is designed to introduce the students to modern biochemical experimental methods for studying the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Experiments will include the use of buffers, spectroscopy, enzyme assays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoassays in the analysis of biological macromolecules. Isolation and purification techniques will be emphasized along with quantitative procedures. Students will be expected to keep a professional quality research notebook, read biochemical research articles and complete experimental work weekly. Cross-listed as CHEM 320L. It is highly recommended that students enroll in BIO 320/CHEM 320 simultaneously. Offered every fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201, 202 with labs.

BIO 321  Biochemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

This course is a continuation of CHEM 320 course with an emphasis on the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in physiological systems. The metabolic pathways are examined from an integrated thermodynamic and kinetic regulatory perspective. Cellular signaling, metabolic disorders, and the role of ATP, and its production are fully considered. Applications of biochemistry in medicine and pharmaceuticals are also emphasized. Special discussion is placed on important biochemistry research topics during the latter part of the semester forwhich much material is drawn from the current biochemical literature. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of molecular biochemistry and the living world of biology. This course is required for Biochemistry majors and most pre-pharmacy students. All pre-professional students, biology majors and chemistry majors are welcome to enroll. Cross-listed as CHEM 321. Offered every spring semester on even numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320.

BIO 321L  Biochemistry II:Lab    1 sem. hr.

An extension of BIO 320/CHEM 320 lab, this laboratory course is designed to continue introducing the students to modern biochemical experimental methods for studying the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Experiments will include the use of buffers, spectroscopy, enzyme assays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoassays in the analysis of biological macromolecules. Isolation and purification techniques will be emphasized along with quantitativeprocedures. Students will be expected to keep a professional quality research notebook, read biochemical research articles and complete experimental work weekly. Cross-listed as CHEM 321L. It is highly recommended that students enroll in BIO 321/CHEM 321 simultaneously. Offered every spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 320/CHEM 320 with lab.

BIO 330  Conservation Biology    3 sem. hrs.

Examines the protection and management of the Earth’s diverse species,habitats, and ecosystems. Offered spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102.

BIO 335  Biogeochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

The examination of the control and function of the Earth's global biogeochemical cycles. This course reviews the basic inorganic and organic chemistry of biologically significant elements, and then considers the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, and metals that take place in soils, sediments, rivers, the oceans and atmosphere. Recommended: NS 105. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 102 and BIO 101, 102.

BIO 380  Pathophysiology    3 sem. hrs.

Human physiology, as addressed through descriptions of human diseases and disorders. All major systems will be included. The normal functions of human systems and organs are made clear by study of their malfunctions. Intended for nursing majors. Prerequistie: BIO 209-210. Offered every fall semester.

BIO 390  Biology Internship    1-3 sem. hrs.

The Biology internship offers course credit for practical learning experiences in the fields of biology, biochemistry, environmental science (applied biology track), pre-professional school areas, bio-informatics, clinical laboratory sciences and comprehensive science. The internship can be set up with a company, organization or group so that students gain valuable applied experience in biology-related studies. Internships must provide supervised experiences in biology-related fields resulting in a written report by the student, a supervisor evaluation and a faculty assessment of learning that transpired. Internship readiness is determined by student advisor in biology-related fields. Offered every semester.

BIO 401  Embryology    4 sem. hrs.

Course provides an understanding of the development of tissues, organs, and systems of representative animals from fertilization through birth or hatching. Student may need additional time on his/her own in lab beyond the scheduled lab hours. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Offered spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or BIO 209, 210.

BIO 401L  Embryology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

BIO 402  DV:Genetics    3 sem. hrs.

The course examines the role of DNA as the basic molecule of heredity in viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotes and its transmission to offspring. Topics discussed include Mendelian laws of heredity, polygenic traits, probabilities of inheritance, meiosis/mitosis, linked traits, chromosome mapping, crossing-over and population genetics involving the Hardy-Weinberg law. The structure of the gene is studied andthe regulation of its expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes is examined.The relationship between genes and disease including cancer is discussed. Recommended: BIO 306. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102 or BIO 209, 210.

BIO 402L  Genetics: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This laboratory experience is meant to compliment the lecture. The laboratory exercises examine the transmission of genetic traits in fruit flies, fungi, bacteria and humans. DNA is extracted and analyzed by electrophoresis and tools of bioinformatics. Laboratory meets for two hours per week. Recommended: BIO 306. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portion simultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102 or BIO 209, 210.

BIO 403  Clinical Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Clinical Biochemistry is concerned with the detection and measurement of biochemical changes in disease. This course focuses on the areas of body function required for the maintenance of health including: carbohydrates metabolism, transport and storage of lipids and lipoproteins, acid-base balance and blood gases as well as control of water and electrolytes and kidney function. Genetic control is covered with an emphasis on endocrinology including thyroid hormones. Thecourse also includes a discussion of digestion, nutrition, and drugs, in addition to, liver function, relevant enzymology and the immune system. This course is suitable for students interested in careers in biochemistry, chemistry, biology, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary. Cross-listed as CHEM 403. Offered fall semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 320/CHEM 320, BIO 321/CHEM 321 or BIO 307/CHEM 307.

BIO 404  Physical Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Physical Biochemistry aims at understanding biological systems and processes in terms of the underlying physical and chemical laws. The course quantitatively investigates the interactions, dynamics, and structure of biological molecules at the molecular level in terms of kinetics, thermodynamics, spatio-temporal organization. Cross-listed as CHEM 404. Three one-hour lectures per week. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: MATH 207.

Corequisite: MATH 207.

BIO 405  Microanatomy    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the structure of tissue at the light and electron microscopic level and has been updated to include recent findings in cellular, genetics and developmental biology pertaining to microanatomy. The course begins with an introduction to the structure of the cell and the organelles found within the cell as well as the extracellular matrix found around the cells. The course focuses upon the organization of cells and their extracellular matrix into tissues. Differentiationof tissues and pathology of tissue in several human diseases is examined. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 209, 210.

BIO 405L  Microanatomy: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The student will study the microscopic appearance of cells and the organization of the cells with the extracellular matrix into tissue. The course meets for two hours per week. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portion simultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 209, 210.

BIO 406  Molecular Biology    3 sem. hrs.

This course delves into the biochemistry of genes - their expression, replication, and mutation. The laboratory includes hands-on work in recombinant DNA technology. The student also will be exposed to the latest developments in the laboratory investigation of genes and proteins, which are helping us unlock the secrets of the cell. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week. Recommended: BIO 402. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102.

BIO 406L  Molecular Biology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

BIO 407  Molecular Pharmacology    3 sem. hrs.

This course deals with the biochemistry and physiology of drugs and their effects on living systems. As is the case with the science of pharmacology, the interactions of drugs with cellular targets are used as a means to understand normal cellular functions. We will deal with common over-the counter medications, prescription medications, antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, drugs of abuse, and new approaches to drug therapy. Three hours of lecture per week. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: BIO 209, 210, CHEM 201, 202.

BIO 408  Virology    3 sem. hrs.

Introductory course which emphasizes the morphology, replication, and pathogenicity of viruses which infect animals, plants and bacteria, with special emphasis on those infecting man. Recommended: BIO 306. Offered spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 206.

BIO 408L  Virology:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This laboratory experience is meant to compliment the lecture. Students will work with bacteriophage and animal viruses and perform growth curve experiments and titrations of virus stocks. SDS-PAGE and immunoassays will be used to monitor the expression of viral proteins. The laboratory meets for two hours per week. It is suggested that the student take the laboratory portionsimultaneously with the lecture portion of the course. Offered spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 206.

BIO 410  Topics in Biology    2-4 sem. hrs.

These advanced biology courses are offered periodically and strategically as needed. Topics can vary across the entire spectrum of biological studies and these courses provide students diverse choices in specialized areas of advanced biology. Check with course instructors for enrollment prerequisites as courses are posted.

BIO 410L  Topics in Biology: Lab    1 sem. hr.

BIO 411  Introduction to Research    1,2 sem. hrs.

Intended for advanced students, course includes methods for searching the biological literature and using the library. A two-semester research project will be discussed and assigned. Research projects typically involve advanced experimental work and submission of a paper. Projects are assigned with intent to produce publishable data and results. Permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. A Maximum of 2 credits can be applied to upper-division biology requirements for the major or the minor. Offered every semester.

BIO 412  Introduction to Research    2 sem. hrs.

Intended for advanced students, course includes methods for searching the biological literature and using the library. A two-semester research project will be discussed and assigned. Research projects typically involve advanced experimental work and submission of a paper. Projects are assigned with intent to produce publishable data and results. Permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. A Maximum of 2 credits can be applied to upper-division biology requirements for the major or the minor. Offered every semester.

BIO 414  Cellular Molecular Tech    3 sem. hrs.

An upper-level techniques-based course designed to prepare students for graduate level research. In this course students will not only master and make use of various techniques commonly encountered in a Cell or Molecular biology lab, such as: Preparation of buffers/solutions, DNA, RNA and Protein extraction, agarose gel electrophoresis, use of restriction endonucleases, PCR, RT PCR and Real-TimePCR, DNA sequencing, SDS PAGE, Western Blotting, Immunocytochemistry,Tissue Culture, Ion Exchange, Immunoaffinity, Size Exclusion and DNA affinity Chromatography; they will also be reintroduced to the scientific method and use of research tools to search the primary literature. Writing and data analysis and presentation in the sciences is also emphasized as each student will write agrant-like proposal, abstract and generate a poster that will be presented on campus to the science faculty. Recommended: BIO 306 or 402. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102 or 209, 210; BIO 206, CHEM 201, 202.

BIO 415  Evolution    3 sem. hrs.

This course is the study of the causes, processes and consequences of evolution. Topics will include an examination of macroevolutionary patterns and microevolutionary processes along with an overview of the major evolutionary trends in biotic diversity. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102 and junior or senior standing.

BIO 420  Bioinformatics Applications    3 sem. hrs.

In this course we will learn to use many of the tools of bioinformatics, including genome database, BLAST searcher, DNA analysis software, and protein structure modeling. Biology majors will complete a project which relates to one of their upper-level biology classes. CS students will complete a project involving programming or another CS activity. Cross-listed as CS 420. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisites: for biology majors, BIO 101-102 along with one of BIO 306, BIO 403, or BIO 307/CHEM 307; for CS majors, junior or senior students who have completed at least 2 programming courses.

BIO 430  GIS/Remote Sensing    3 sem. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), elements of GIS, analysis of spatial information, real-world applications, map creation and analysis. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years beginning 2017.

Prerequisite: junior standing.

BIO 435  Limnology (Aquatic Ecology)    4 sem. hrs.

The interdisciplinary study of inland waters including lakes, wetlands, ground water, and streams. Offered fall semester on even-numbered years beginning 2016.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102; CHEM 101, 102.

Chemistry

CHEM 100  Introduction to Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for students who have had little or no chemistry experience prior to attending Walsh. This course is mandatory for nursing-intended students who place in CHEM 100 following completion of the chemistry placement exam. This course provides the concepts and basic skill sets to help prepare students for Chem 109. Topics include the metric system; units; significant figures; factor-label calculations; density; atoms, molecules and ions; basic nomenclature of inorganic salts; balancing chemical reactions; mass-mole relationships; basic algebra; logarithms; basics of acid-base chemistry; basic chemical bonding; and an introduction to Lewis structures and VSEPR geometries. The course is taught at a pace to enable substantial repetition and skill development. The course is problem-solving intensive and all students must have a basic scientific calculator. A grade of C- or better in this course is required to enroll in CHEM 109. Offered every fall and spring semester.

CHEM 101  T1: Principles of Chemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

Principles of Chemistry I is designed to help students learn key concepts with skills in chemistry including data management; atoms, molecules and ions; chemical reactions and stoichiometry, gas behavior; thermochemistry, atomic theory & quantum mechanics, and chemical bonding. The course is taught using a combination of interactive lecture, chemical & multi-media demonstrations, group dynamics and problem solving. This course is intended for students who are chemistry or biology majors or education majors with a concentration in the sciences. Consequently, placement beyond MATH 104 is required, and a strong background in high school chemistry is very helpful. This course is offered every Fall semester. Taking the lab in conjunction with the course is highly recommended. 3 hours of lecture and one 3 hour lab per week. This course is offered every fall semester.

CHEM 101L  Principles of Chemistry I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to compliment Chem 101 lecture. A strong focus is placed on proper methods for measuring data (mass, volume, length, etc...), proper use of significant figures; basic statistical methods; graphing and data presentation; laboratory safety and proper scientific report writing. Experiments include, but are not limited to, determination of densities of materials; gravimetric analysis; volumetric analysis (acid-base titrations, etc...); quantitative analysis using spectrophotometry; calorimetry and other labs as time permits. For most experiments, students work independently, but teamwork is also encouraged in certain situations. One 3-hour lab period per week. Offered every fall semester.

CHEM 102  Principles of Chemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

Principles of Chemistry II continues to build on POC I. Topics include chemical bonding, molecular geometry, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, complex ions, thermodynamic state functions, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. This course emphasizes the integrated nature of chemistry and provides numerous practical applications of chemistry in materials science, medicine, pharmaceuticals and food science. A working knowledge of basic algebra, logarithms, and graphing is vital. Taking the lab in conjunction with the course is highly recommended. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 101 with a C- or better.

CHEM 102L  Principles of Chemistry II:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to compliment Chem 102 lecture. A strong focus is placed on proper methods for measuring data (mass, volume, length, etc...), proper use of significant figures, basic statistical methods, graphing and data presentation, laboratory safety and proper scientific report writing. Experiments include, but are not limited to, thin-layer chromatography of pharamaceuticals, colligative properties of solutions; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry; more complex volumetric analysis; and qualitative chemical analysis. For most experiments, students work independently, but teamwork is also encoraged in certain situations. A greater emphasis is placed on exploratory and investigative science during this course. One 3-hour lab per week. Offered every spring semester.

CHEM 109  T1:Gen Org/Biochem I    3 sem. hrs.

This course is specifically designed for students intending to pursue careers in nursing and related fields. This first course focuses on inorganic chemistry or general chemistry. Topics include: measurements; significant figures; metric system; units; density; atoms, molecules and ions; basic nomenclature of inorganic salts and simple diatomic covalent molecules; balancing chemical reactions; stoichiometry (mass-mole relationships); basic gas laws; basics of thermodynamics; acid-base chemistry; basics of chemical kinetics; basics of chemical equilibrium; periodic table; basics of chemical bonding; Lewis structures and VSEPR geometries; and basic of nuclear chemistry. A working knowledge of basic math including simple algebra is needed. This course is calculation intensive. All students need a scientific calculator. Successful completion of the Chem 100 placement exam is needed to enter this course. Taking the lab course (Chem 109L) in conjunction with this lecture course is highly recommended. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in CHEM 110. This course does not count toward the Chemistry or Biology major. Offered during fall, spring, and in summer I session every year.

CHEM 109L  Gen Org/Biochem I/Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to compliment Chem 109 lecture. A strong focus is placed on proper methods for measuring data (mass, volume, length, etc...), proper use of significant figures; basic statistical methods; graphing and data presentation; laboratory safety and proper scientific report writing. Experiments include, but are not limited to, determination of densities of materials; basic gravimetric analysis; volumetric analysis (acid-base titrations, etc...); separation of mixtures; calorimetry and other labs as time permits. For most experiments, students work independently, but teamwork is also encouraged in certain situations. Offered in the fall, spring, and summer I session every year.

CHEM 110  Gen Org/Biochem II    3 sem. hrs.

This course is specifically designed for students intending to pursue careers in nursing and related fields. This course focuses on basic organic chemistry and fundamental biochemistry. Topics include Lewis structures, physical properties, basic nomenclature, and chemical reactions of the following classes of organic compounds: hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes & aromatics), alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, ester, amides, anhydrides, phosphoesters, thioesters, thioalcohols, and amines. Stereochemistry and acid-base topics are also included. The second half of the course applies the organic chemistry to biochemicals with an emphasis on health-related applications. Topics include: amino acids & proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, vitamins and coenzymes, basic metabolism. Clinical topics include, but are not limited to, diabetes, mellitus, clinical isoenzymes, lipoprotein profiles, drug therapies, ethanol metabolism, and others. This course is an organic chemical structure-intensive experience emphasizing structure-function relationships, monomer-polymer relationships and metabolic control systems and disease. Successful completion of Chem 109 is needed to enter this course. This course does not count toward a chemistry or biology major. Taking the lab course (Chem 110L) in conjunction with this lecture course is highly recommended. Normally offered during fall, spring, and summer II sessions every year.

CHEM 110L  Gen Org/Biochem II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 110 lecture. Experiments are designed to introduce students to the behavior of organic molecules and with an emphasis on biomolecules. Functional group identification, the chemical properties of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids are investigated. Clinical, nutritional and medical applications are stressed. Offered in fall, spring, and in summer II session every year. One 3-hour lab period per week.

CHEM 198  Chem Career Seminar IA    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involvinga once weekly meeting to explore the careers in chemistry. This seminaris for chemistry majors. Offered every fall semester.

CHEM 199  Chem Careers Seminar 1B    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involvinga once weekly meeting to explore the careers in chemistry. This seminaris for chemistry majors. Offered every spring semester.

CHEM 200  Aspects of Clinical Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry are used to examine chemical basis for a variety of prevalent clinical disorders. Topics include basic organic chemistry, bioorganic reactions, basic biochemistry, metabolism of ethanol, chemical basis of the evaluation of thyroid function, biochemistry of diabetes mellitus, sickle cell anemia, phenylketonuria and related enzyme defects, chemical basis for enzyme assays (CK, LDH, AST) in cardiac assessment, and other pertinent topics. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or equivalent.

CHEM 200L  Aspects of Clinical Chem:Lab    1 sem. hr.

CHEM 201  Organic Chemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of molecular orbital theory, thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base chemistry are introduced and used to develop basis for resonance theory, nucleophile-electrophile concept, and functional group-reactivity relationships. Chemistry of alkanes, cycloalkanes, organohalides, and alcohols is investigated. Stereochemistry mechanism analysis and organic synthesis are integrated from mid-semester. First semester of two semester sequence. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: Chem 101, 102, CHEM 101L, 102L, all with a grade of "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: CHEM 201L.

CHEM 201L  Organic Chemistry I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Melting point determination, distillation, recrystallization, extraction, thin layer chromatography, and fundamentals of synthesis are introduced during the lab along with introduction to IR, MS, and NMR. First semester of two semester sequence. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 102, CHEM 101L, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: CHEM 201.

CHEM 202  Organic Chemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

Principles introduced in Organic Chemistry I are used to study chemistry of alkenes, dienes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines, and heterocyclics. Molecular spectroscopy (NMR, IR, UV-VIS and Raman) are integrated throughout and synthetic and mechanistic chemistry emphasized. Second semester of two semester sequence. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: CHEM 201 and 201L, both with "C-" or better.

Corequisite: CHEM 202L.

CHEM 202L  Organic Chemistry II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Planning and performance of organic syntheses and verification of molecular structure using IR, MS, and NMR, and various chemical tests are presented in the lab. One four-hour lab per week. Second semester of two semester sequence. Pre-requisite: CHEM 201 and CHEM 201L, both "C-" or better. Offered every spring semester.

Corequisite: CHEM 202.

CHEM 206  Org Chem for Env Science    4 sem. hrs.

This course will introduce fundamentals of Organic Chemistry in the context of environmental applications. Students will learn organic functional groups, naturally occurring organic molecules and synthetics with environmental implications. The majority of the course will be focused on learning about organic chemicals with environmental impact, how we detect these compounds, MSDS data and the importance of responsible management of organic chemicals in consumer products and industry. Offered every spring semester beginning spring 2017.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L and BIO 101, 101L, 102, 102L, and MATH 104.

CHEM 298  Chemistry Seminar IIA    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involving a once weekly meeting to learn from professional chemists, explore internship options and discuss real-world applications of chemistry. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every fall semester.

CHEM 299  Chemistry Seminar IIA    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involving a once weekly meeting to learn from professional chemists, explore internship options and discuss real-world applications of chemistry. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every spring semester.

CHEM 301  Quantitative Analysis    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the use of statistics in chemistry along with the studyof gravimetric and volumetric methods of analysis are presented. Principlesand applications of chemical equilibria, acid-base reactions, solubilityand precipitation, complexion formation, and redox reactions are covered. Pre-requisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 301L.

CHEM 301L  Quantitative Analysis: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Statistical analyses are performed and presented. The studies of gravimetricand volumetric methods of analysis are practiced. Creating acid-base, metal, and EDTA titration curves are also practiced. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 301.

CHEM 302  Instrumental Analysis    3 sem. hrs.

Theoretical and practical principles of chemical analysis involving useof electronics, atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, and separationmethods are discussed. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 302L.

CHEM 302L  Instrumental Analysis: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Theoretical and practical principles of chemical analysis involving useof electronics, atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, and separationmethods are practiced. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 302.

CHEM 303  Modern Analytical Chem    3 sem. hrs.

This course will focus on classical and modern methods of chemical analysis. Data management, “wet” methods and instrumental methods of analysis will be explored with applications in various areas of chemistry including materials science, organic synthesis, structure characterizations, and many others. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L, CHEM 206 and 206L for Environmental Chemistry Majors.

CHEM 303L  Modern Analytical Chem Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab will complement the CHEM 303 course and will involve hands on experience with gravimetric, volumetric and instrumental methods of analysis in chemical problem solving. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L, CHEM 206 and 206L for Environmental Chemistry Majors.

CHEM 305  Inorganic Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course presents fundamental theories and applications of the chemistry of inorganic compounds, particularly the main-group elements. Topics include VSEPR theory, molecular symmetry and group theory, theories in chemical bonding, chemistry of the main-group elements, spectroscopic and analytical methods, coordination chemistry, crystal field theory, inorganic polymers, solid state chemistry, solution chemistry, and organometallic chemistry and green inorganic chemistry. Course also includes an oral and writing component and considerable integration of research literature. Students are expected to read, abstract, and present current topics in inorganic chemistry. Offered spring of every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 with a C- or better grade.

CHEM 305L  Inorganic Chemistry:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 305 lecture. The focus is the manipulation and synthesis of inorganic compounds. Topics include the chemistry of phosphazenes, silanes, materials chemistry, and inorganic polymers. Students will gain knowledge of anaerobic techniques for air-sensitive compounds. Offered spring of every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 with a C- or better grade.

CHEM 307  Essential Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the structure, chemistry and biological functions of some of the primary biomolecules: proteins, lipids, saccharides, nucleic acids, and vitamins & coenzymes. The course then focuses on fundamentals of enzymology, central catabolic metabolism and key features of biochemical regulation and integration. Applications of biochemistry in medicine and pharmaceuticals are also emphasized.The course is taught using a combination of interactive lecture, demonstrations and group activities. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201-202, BIO 306 is helpful.

CHEM 307L  Essential Biochemistry:Lab    1 sem. hr.

CHEM 310  Found of Physical Chem    4 sem. hrs.

This course will explore classical concepts in thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, kinetics and equilibrium.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101-102 and labs, CHEM 201-202 and labs and Calculus I and II.

CHEM 320  Biochemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the chemistry of biological compounds that include amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and nucleic acids with an emphasis on their structure-function relationships. Protein structure and biosynthesis, enzymes kinetics and mechanisms, and biological membranes are covered in detail. This course is required for Biochemistry majors and most pre-pharmacy students. All pre-professional students, biology majors and chemistry majors are welcome to enroll. Cross-listed as BIO 320. Offered every fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201, 202.

CHEM 320L  Biochemistry I:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This laboratory course is designed to introduce the students to modern biochemical experimental methods for studying the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Experiments will include the use of buffers, spectroscopy, enzyme assays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoassays in the analysis of biological macromolecules. Isolation and purification techniques will be emphasized along with quantitative procedures. Students will be expected to keep a professional quality research notebook, read biochemical research articles and complete experimental work weekly. Cross-listed as BIO 320L. It is highly recommended that students enroll in BIO 320/CHEM 320 simultaneously. Offered every fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L.

CHEM 321  Biochemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

This course is a continuation of CHEM 320 course with an emphasis on the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in physiological systems. The metabolic pathways are examined from an integrated thermodynamic and kinetic regulatory perspective. Cellular signaling, metabolic disorders, and the role of ATP, and its production are fully considered. Applications of biochemistry in medicine and pharmaceuticals are also emphasized. Special discussion is placed on important biochemistry research topics during the latter part of the semester forwhich much material is drawn from the current biochemical literature. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of molecular biochemistry and the living world of biology. This course is required for Biochemistry majors and most pre-pharmacy students. All pre-professional students, biology majors and chemistry majors are welcome to enroll. Cross-listed as BIO 321. Offered every spring semester on even numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320.

CHEM 321L  Biochemistry II:Lab    1 sem. hr.

An extension of BIO 320/CHEM 320 lab, this laboratory course is designed to continue introducing the students to modern biochemical experimental methods for studying the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Experiments will include the use of buffers, spectroscopy, enzyme assays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoassays in the analysis of biological macromolecules. Isolation and purification techniques will be emphasized along with quantitativeprocedures. Students will be expected to keep a professional quality research notebook, read biochemical research articles and complete experimental work weekly. Cross-listed as BIO 321L. It is highly recommended that students enroll in BIO 321/CHEM 321 simultaneously. Offered every spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 320/CHEM 320 with lab.

CHEM 335  Biogeochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

The examination of the control and function of the Earth's global biogeochemical cycles. This course reviews the basic inorganic and organic chemistry of biologically significant elements, and then considers the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, and metals that take place in soils, sediments, rivers, the oceans and atmosphere. Recommended: NS 105. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 102, BIO 101, 102.

CHEM 390  DV:Chemistry Internship    1-3 sem. hrs.

This course offers credit for doing an internship in chemistry with our business partners. This seminar is for Chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semesters.

CHEM 398  Chemistry Seminar IIIA    1 sem. hr.

DV: This course offers credit for doing an internship in chemistry with our business partners. The students will choose a field and participate in an internship. This seminar is for Chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semesters.

CHEM 401  Physical Chemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the kinetic theory of gases and gas laws, thermodynamics, three laws of thermodynamics, heat, temperature, enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs energy and their relationships. The course focuses on Phase equilibria, thermodynamics of transition, phase diagrams, properties of mixtures, and deep emphasis on chemical equilibrium. Offered fall semester every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101-102, PHYS 101-102, MATH 207.

Corequisites: MATH 208 or MATH 307.

CHEM 401L  Physical Chemistry I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 401 lecture. Experiments include verification of the ideal gas law by digital and U-tube manometers, determination of enthalpy utilizing oxygen bomb calorimeter, examination of equilibrium parameters by titration, and exploring the properties of mixtures and colligative properties. The lab focuses on analyzing research articles and discussing their significant points in order to correlate theories to applications. The students also present materials that demonstrate how the operation of biologicalsystems obeys theoretical physical laws. One four-hour session per week. Offered fall semester every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101-102,PHYS 101-102, MATH 207, Corequisites: MATH 208 or MATH 307.

CHEM 402  Physical Chemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

Study of quantum theories and chemical kinetics that includes rate laws, order, mechanism, and catalysis, and basics of atomic structure and molecular interactions. The course covers theories and applications on macromolecules and aggregates, molecular rotations and vibrations, electronic transition and photochemistry, and magnetic resonance. Offered spring semester every even-numbered year.

Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better grade) of CHEM 401.

CHEM 402L  Physical Chemistry II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 402 lecture. Experiments include verification of Beer's law and determination of rate law using UV-Vis spectrometer, studying colloids and surface chemistry, practical and biological applications utilizing Fluorescence, Phosphorescence, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopic techniques. The lab also focuseson analyzing research articles related to Infra-red and laser techniques in order to correlate theories to applications. One four-hour lab per week. Offered spring semester every even-numbered year.

Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better grade) of CHEM 401 lab.

CHEM 403  Clinical Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Clinical Biochemistry is concerned with the detection and measurement of biochemical changes in disease. This course focuses on the areas of body function required for the maintenance of health including: carbohydrates metabolism, transport and storage of lipids and lipoproteins, acid-base balance and blood gases as well as control of water and electrolytes and kidney function. Genetic control is covered with an emphasis on endocrinology including thyroid hormones. The course also includes a discussion of digestion, nutrition, and drugs, in addition to, liver function, relevant enzymology and the immune system. This course is suitable for students interested in careers in biochemistry, chemistry, biology, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary. Cross-listed as BIO 403 Offered every fall semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO/CHEM 320, BIO/CHEM 321 or BIO/CHEM 307.

CHEM 403L  Biochemistry I:Lab    1 sem. hr.

CHEM 404  Physical Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Physical Biochemistry aims at understanding biological systems and processes in terms of the underlying physical and chemical laws. The course quantitatively investigates the interactions, dynamics, and structure of biological molecules at the molecular level in terms of kinetics, thermodynamics, spatio-temporal organization. Cross-listed as BIO 404. Offered every spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: MATH 207.

Corequisite: MATH 207.

CHEM 405  Topics in Chemistry    3,4 sem. hrs.

These courses are not part of the Division’s normal course sequence and are offered by faculty in their areas of specialization. Course topics include: Quantum Mechanics, Chromatography, Advanced Organic Chemistry, Advanced Laboratory Methods, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Green Chemistry, Molecular Modeling and others. Check course offerings in any given semester for these classes. Prerequisites vary and enrollment requires permission of advisor or Division Chair.

CHEM 407  Molecular Pharmacology    3 sem. hrs.

This course deals with the biochemistry and physiology of drugs and their effects on living systems. As is the case with the science of pharmacology, the interactions of drugs with cellular targets are used as a means to understand normal cellular functions. We will deal with common over-the counter medications, prescription medications, antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, drugs of abuse, and new approaches to drug therapy. Three hours of lecture per week. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: BIO 209, 210, CHEM 201, 202.

CHEM 411  Introduction to Research    1,2 sem. hrs.

Intended for advanced students, course includes methods for searching the chemical literature and using the library. A two-semester research project will be discussed and assigned. Research projects typically involve advanced experimental work and submission of a paper. Projects are assigned with intent to produce publishable data and results. Permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. A maximum of 2 credits can be applied to the CHEM major or minor. Offered every semester.

CHEM 412  Introduction to Research    1,2 sem. hrs.

Intended for advanced students, course includes methods for searchingthe chemical literature and using the library. A two-semester researchproject will be discussed and assigned. Research projects typically involveadvanced experimental work and submission of a paper. Projects are assigned with intent to produce publishable data and results. Permission of Division Chair. A maximum of 2 credits can be applied to the CHEM major or minor. Offered every semester.

CHEM 415L  Integrated Lab Experience I    2 sem. hrs.

The integrated laboratory experience is a project-based learning experiencein which chemistry majors will choose a problem to explore. Students will design and implement a project to attempt to solve the problem posed using a suite of chemical analytical tools available. The project will be extended over three semesters and will be done in conjunction with a faculty mentor. The deliverables will be a major report, a presentation on campus and possible a publishable artifact. Students will be encouraged to be creative to explore various analyticalsolutions to the problem posed and to meet with their peers regularlyto discuss progress and share ideas for ongoing work.

CHEM 416L  Integrated Laboratory Exp II    2 sem. hrs.

This course is the extension of CHEM 415L.

CHEM 417L  Integ Lab Experience III    2 sem. hrs.

This course is the extension of CHEM 416L.

CHEM 440  NMR Theory & Applications    3 sem. hrs.

This course emphasizes the fundamental aspects of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The theory of pulsed Fourier transform NMR is presented using a conceptual nonmathematical approach. The course is geared toward an audience which seeks an understanding of NMR theory and an appreciation of the practical applications of NMR in chemical analysis. Students are exposed to hands-on NMR operation. Detailed instructions are provided and eachstudent is expected to carry out his or her own NMR experiments onour Anasazi EFT-60 NMR spectrometer.

CHEM 450  Environmental Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore methods of chemical analysis in environmentalapplications related to EPA standards, environmental toxicology, product safety issues and exposure limits. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L.

CHEM 460  Materials Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore the chemistry and properties of materials used in a wide range of industrial and consumer applications. Topics will include polymers, hybrid materials, catalysts, metals and many others in the context of design strategies, testing and real-world use. Offered for the first time in 2016-2017.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L.

CHEM 470  Nano and Fuel Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore the chemistry and properties of materials used in the fuel industry with a focus on nano-technology applications. Offered for the first time in 2016-2017.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L.

CHEM 498  Chemistry Career Seminar    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) capstone experience that will involve chemistry majors discussing, sharing and evaluating internship experiences as professional presentations. The focus in the course is on market readiness and job placement. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semester starting in fall 2016.

CHEM 499  Chemistry Career Seminar    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) capstone experience that will involve chemistry majors discussing, sharing and evaluating internship experiences as professional presentations. The focus in the course is on market readiness and job placement. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semester starting in fall 2016.

Computer Science

CS 101  Computers    3 sem. hrs.

How we talk to computers and make them do what we want. Trends and social issues. Hands-on exercises in the laboratory. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: none.

CS 105  Programming for Everyone    3 sem. hrs.

Applications and software. Programming with an easy general-purpose language (currently Python). Data types including strings and lists. Text-file processing. Interactive Programs. Loops, decisions, functions. No prior programming experience required. Offered every fall.

Prerequisite: Equivalent of MATH 103 (Algebra I).

CS 108  Found of Computer Science I    3 sem. hrs.

An introduction to computers, basic coding, hardware, networks and digital applications to create a framework for computer science majors to understand the various areas of computer science.

Prerequisite: High School Mathematics.

CS 109  Foundations of CS 11    3 sem. hrs.

An introduction to computers, basic coding, hardware, networks and digital applications to create a framework for computer science majors to understand the various areas of computer science.

Prerequisite: CS 108.

CS 111  Intro to Obj-Oriented Program    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to programming in an object-oriented language. Early work will emphasize procedural programming techniques - introducing students to data types, input-output operations, decision statements, loops, and arrays. Students will then study construction of simple user-defined classes.

Prerequisite: MATH 103 with a grade of C or above.

CS 112  Introduction to Networking    3 sem. hrs.

Students will study the elements of a computer network including the base framework and infrastructure, concepts of operation, installation, and configuration of the hardware and operating system software. Students will acquire hands-on experience from actual setup and configuration in a network lab environment.

CS 113  Intro to Digital Applications    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to core elements of digital applications related to software use, mobile platforms, websites, social media and entertainment will be presented. Students will learn the basic history, evolution and elements of these important personal and social tools.

CS 120  Introduction to Bioinformatics    3 sem. hrs.

Bioinformatics is the application of computer power to problems in Biology and medicine. This course provides an introduction to the problems addressed by the cross-disciplinary field of bioinformatics, and to some of the tools made available by this technology. Students will use bioinformatics to investigate genome organization, gene structure, and the four levels of protein structure. Students are introduced to molecular visualization tools, sequence analysis software, and on-linesequence comparison tools. A short paper is required, investigating aparticular gene, its product, the structure of the product, and its function in the cell. Three one-hour lectures per week. Cross-listed as BIO 120. Offered every fall.

CS 199  Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

To fill special student needs or take advantage of a visiting professor or serve as an experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Requires permission of Director of Computer Science.

CS 201  Visual Basic I    3 sem. hrs.

Develop Graphic User Interfaces and add event-driven code to create and/or run simple applications from the Windows environment, using VISUAL BASIC. Understand and use forms, controls, properties, modules. Learn proper Windows design and design considerations. This is largely a hands-on course. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: Familiarity with the use of Windows, plus CS111 or one semester of college computer programming, or permission of the instructor.

CS 203  FORTRAN    3 sem. hrs.

Practical programming in FORTRAN. Data types and arrays. Algorithm design and structured methods. Programmed functions, subprograms. Program qualities: readable, reliable, maintainable. Applications to numerical, scientific, statistical, related areas. Hands-on use of production-quality version. Scheduled as needed.

Prerequisite: CS 111 or permission of instructor.

CS 207  COBOL    3 sem. hrs.

Programming applied to typical business and administrative data processing with hands-on exercises using production-quality version of COBOL . Offered every spring semester of odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CS 111 or permission of instructor.

CS 210  Understanding UNIX/LINUX    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the UNIX/Linux operating systems will be conducted using a laboratory environment. Students explore the components of the UNIX/Linux operating system, discuss installation and configuration elements, and examine their application in today's business economy.

CS 211  Programming Structures    3 sem. hrs.

Construction of classes and subclasses in Java. Basic data structures(including arrays, array lists, …) and their appropriateness in programmingsituations. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: CS 111 with grade of C or above.

CS 212  Intro Object-Oriented Prg II    3 sem. hrs.

Further work with user-defined classes as well as data structures such as array lists and linked lists, searching and sorting techniques, simple text file handling, generic methods and classes and recursion.

Prerequisite: CS 111 with a grade of C or above; MATH 104 with a grade of C or better.

CS 220  Discrete Patterns for Comp Sci    3 sem. hrs.

Investigation of Discrete Patterns that are especially relevant to Computer Science including Boolean logic, propositions, induction and recursion, counting techniques, discrete probability.

Prerequisite: MATH 155 with grade of C or above.

CS 221  Database Techniques    3 sem. hrs.

Types of database structures: hierarchic, network, relational. Preparation of structure (normalization, design of records). DBMS use and management, including intermediate SQL. Consideration of data integrity, reliability, security. Hands-on experience using typical DBMS software. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: CS 111 or permission of instructor.

CS 230  Discrete Patterns I    3 sem. hrs.

(See MATH 230-231) Algorithms and Combinatorics. Logic, circuits, Karnaugh maps. Proofs, including quantified statements and mathematical induction. Relations, graphs, trees. Languages and finite-state machines. Offered every spring.

Prerequisite: MATH 155 or equivalent with permission.

CS 231  Discrete Patterns II    3 sem. hrs.

(See MATH 230-231) Algorithms and Combinatorics. Logic, circuits, Karnaugh maps. Proofs, including quantified statements and mathematical induction. Relations, graphs, trees. Languages and finite-state machines. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: CS 230.

CS 251  Web Publishing    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the Internet, World Wide Web, HTML, and web page authoring. Web page construction using web authoring tools will include: frames, graphics, sound and animation. Appropriate design and copyright issues will be addressed. Offered every fall semester.

CS 280  Bioinformatics Seminar    1 sem. hr.

A one-credit course in which on-line genome databases will be explored. The course culminates with a project inquiring into some aspect of cell biology, drawing on bioinformatics tools made available by various databases, such as the human genome browsers at NCBI, EMBL, and UCSD, the OMIM and OMIA databases, and gene expression data from EST and microarray databases. Cross-listed as BIO 280. Offered every spring.

Prerequisites: BIO101, 102.

CS 298  Computer Sci Career Seminar I    1 sem. hr.

This introductory seminar focuses on helping beginning computer science students from all three majors gain valuable time with professionals in the field, through seminars presentations and at conferences meant to expose students to career options in CS.

CS 299  Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

To fill special student needs or take advantage of a visiting professor or serve as an experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Requires permission of Director of Computer Science.

CS 301  Visual BASIC II    3 sem. hrs.

More advanced concepts and methods in Visual BASIC, with concentration on Database and Client-Server Applications and related topics. Offered every spring semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CS 201 and CS 221 with grade of C or above.

CS 306  Computer Organization    3 sem. hrs.

Investigation of the computer as hierarchy of levels-digital logic; microprogramming; machine; assembly language, operating systems. Includes lab work in assembly language. Offered every spring semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CS 211 with grade of C or above.

CS 311  Programming Algorithms    3 sem. hrs.

Representation of algorithms in pseudocode and Java. Efficiency of algorithms. Recursion. Sorting and searching algorithms. Stacks and queues. Exception handling. Offered every spring.

Prerequisite: CS 211 with grade of C or above.

CS 314  Functional Programming    3 sem. hrs.

Concepts, structures, methods and applications appropriate to the Functional Paradigm (Currently Haskell). Offered every fall semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CS 111 with grade of C or above, or permission of instructor.

CS 320  Programming in .NET    3 sem. hrs.

Working with programming techniques in Windows.NET environment.

Prerequisite: CS 212 with a grade of C or above.

CS 326  Integrated Information Systems    3 sem. hrs.

(See BUS 326) Study of conceptual foundations, structures and development of effective data-based management systems, including analysis of appropriate hardware, software, and administrative controls. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: BUS 105 or CS 101 or permission of the instructor.

CS 335  LINUX/UNIX Programming    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the LINUX/UNIX programming environments.

Prerequisite: CS 212 with grade of C or above.

CS 385  Computer Science Internship    1-6 sem. hrs.

Interns receive practical learning experience outside the academic setting. Requires permission of the Director of Computer Science and agreement of the relevant authority on the employer's side. May not be repeated. Offered by arrangement.

CS 386  Introduction to Cybersecurity    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines fundamental concepts of computer and network security, cyber-attacks, and cyber-defense. Students will examine the legal aspects of cybercrime and investigate standards and best practices for mitigating cybercrime.

CS 399  Special Topics    1 sem. hr.

To fill special student needs or take advantage of a visiting professor or serve as an experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. May be repeated as new topics are presented. Requires permission of Director of Computer Science.

CS 402  Modular Projects    3 sem. hrs.

Students will undertake a semester-long, real-life programming project while gaining expertise in the C language. Individual or group projects depending on the composition of the class and the interests of the students. Offered every fall semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CS 311 or with grade of C or above.

CS 403  Object Oriented Prog w/C++    3 sem. hrs.

Object-oriented programming using the C++ language. Topics include abstract data types, polymorphism and overloading. Assumes familiarity and comfort with C programming language. Course begins with investigation of differences between C and C++; proceeds into object-oriented programming in C++. Includes work with the Standard Template Library (STL). Offered every spring semester of odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CS 402 with grade of C or above or ability to program in C and permission of instructor.

CS 404  Prin of Computer Languages    3 sem. hrs.

Comparative study of key programming languages in view of design concepts and seminal implementation methods. Introduction to LISP or similar language with lab exercises. Not currently offered.

Prerequisites: CS 306 and CS 311 with grade of C or above.

CS 405  Operating Systems    3 sem. hrs.

Investigation of the principles of a modern computer operating system. Topics include processes, memory management, input/output, file systems. Examples will be taken from current operating systems such as Windows, LINUX/UNIX. Offered every spring of odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CS 306 and CS 402 with grade of C or above.

CS 406  Cybersecurity II    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the ethical and criminal aspects of cybersecurity and the economic impact to society. Students will investigate security from an ethical and criminal hacking perspective. Students will examine the forensic protocols involved with investigating security threats and breaches as well as system defense through mechanisms such as physical and software controls.

CS 420  Bioinformatics Applications    3 sem. hrs.

In this course we will learn to use many of the tools of bioinformatics, including genome database, BLAST searcher, DNA analysis software, and protein structure modeling. Biology majors will complete a project which relates to one of their upper-level biology classes. CS students will complete a project involving programming or another CS activity. Cross-listed as BIO 420. Offered every fall.

Prerequisites: for biology majors, BIO 101-102 along with one of BIO 306, BIO 403, or BIO 307/CHEM 307; for CS majors, junior or senior students who have completed at least 2 programming courses.

CS 425  Software Engineering I    3 sem. hrs.

: Programming in C++. This course builds on the materials introduced in CS 111 and CS 212, adding work with exception handling and threads. Students work with larger-scale programs culminating in a major modular project – a well-organized collection of classes.

Prerequisite: CS 212 with a grade of C or better; CS 306 with a grade of C or above.

CS 426  Software Engineering II    3 sem. hrs.

Students continue to work on interdisciplinary group programming projects. These projects may require students to learn a new computer language – depending upon the project's requirements/specifications.

Prerequisite: CS 425.

CS 490  Independent Study/Research    3 sem. hrs.

With permission of Director of Computer Science; by arrangement.

CS 498  CS Career Seminar II    1 sem. hr.

This capstone experiences focuses on helping advanced computer science students from all three majors gain valuable time with professionals in the field, through seminars presentations and at conferences.

Environmental Science

ES 101  Environ Science Seminar I    1 sem. hr.

Part 1 of a sequential series of seminar courses to introduce and reinforcecurrent topics and skills needed in environmental science careers. Offered every spring semester.

ES 201  Environmental Science Sem II    1 sem. hr.

Part 2 of a sequential series of seminar courses to introduce and reinforcecurrent topics and skills needed in environmental science careers. Offered every spring semester.

ES 230  Environmental Ethics & Polic    3 sem. hrs.

The principle aim of this course is to develop the analytical tools necessary to understand the ethical issues that arise in the context of public policy decisions regarding environmental protection. Offered every spring semester.

ES 301  Environ Science Seminar III    1 sem. hr.

Part 3 of a sequential series of seminar courses to introduce and reinforcecurrent topics and skills needed in environmental science careers. Offered every spring semester.

ES 330  Conservation Biology    3 sem. hrs.

Examines the protection and management of the Earth’s diverse species,habitats, and ecosystems. Offered spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: BIO 101, 102.

ES 335  Biogeochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

The examination of the control and function of the Earth's global biogeochemical cycles. This course reviews the basic inorganic and organic chemistry of biologically significant elements, and then considers the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, and metals that take place in soils, sediments, rivers, the oceans and atmosphere. Recommended: NS 105. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 102, BIO 101, 102.

ES 401  Environmental Sem Series IV    1 sem. hr.

Part 4 of a sequential series of seminar courses to introduce and reinforcecurrent topics and skills needed in environmental science careers. Offered every spring semester starting in spring 2017.

ES 405  Environmental Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore methods of chemical analysis in environmental applications related to EPA standards, environmental toxicology, product safety issues and exposure limits. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L.

ES 430  GIS/Remote Sensing    3 sem. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), elements of GIS, analysis of spatial information, real-world applications, map creation and analysis. Offered spring semester on odd-numbered years beginning 2017.

Prerequisite: junior standing.

ES 435  Limnology (Aquatic Ecology)    4 sem. hrs.

The interdisciplinary study of inland waters including lakes, wetlands, ground water, and streams. Offered fall semester on even-numbered years beginning 2016.

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102, CHEM 101, 102.

ES 450  Environmental Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore methods of chemical analysis in environmentalapplications related to EPA standards, environmental toxicology, product safety issues and exposure limits. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L.

Mathematics

MATH 100  Mathematics Review    3 sem. hrs.

Refresher course in basic mathematics with goal of providing a good foundation for further study/use of mathematics. Topics include operations on integers, fractions and decimals; exponents and order of operation; ratios, proportions and percents; basic algebraic and geometric formulas. Credit, although tabulated within the 130 hours required for graduation, does not satisfy any part of the core curriculum requirements. By placement only. Offered every semester.

MATH 103  Algebra I    3 sem. hrs.

Real numbers, variable expressions, solving equations and applications of equations, polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, graphs and linear equations, systems of linear equations, inequalities, radical expressions, quadratic equations. Prerequisite for 103: by placement or successful completion of MATH 100 with a C or better grade. Offered every semester.

MATH 104  Algebra II    3 sem. hrs.

Real numbers, variable expressions, solving equations and applications of equations, polynomials, factoring, algebraic fractions, graphs and linear equations, systems of linear equations, inequalities, radical expressions, quadratic equations. Prerequisite for 104: By placement or successful completion of MATH 103 with a C or better. Offered every semester.

MATH 107  Mathematics I for Educators    3 sem. hrs.

Problem solving techniques, sets, development of and operations with the real number system, including whole numbers, fractions and decimals, number theory, algebra, probability, statistics, geometry, measurement, applications to early childhood and intervention specialist teaching, NCTM standards. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra.

MATH 108  Mathematics II for Educators    3 sem. hrs.

Problem solving techniques, sets, development of and operations with the real number system, including whole numbers, fractions and decimals, number theory, algebra, probability, statistics, geometry, measurement, applications to early childhood and intervention specialist teaching, NCTM standards. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: MATH 107, SEP students must complete both MATH 109-1 and 109-2 before taking 107.

MATH 109-1  Algebra Found/Appl I    3 sem. hrs.

A two-semester introduction to math at the collegiate level. The first semester focuses on developing foundational math skills while introducing students to basic algebra. The second semester continues the emphasis on skills development but introduces higher-level algebra concepts. Required Weekly tutoring in math in both courses. Equivalent to MATH 100 and MATH 103. Counts toward math proficiency requirement. Course available only to incoming first-year students by placement test. Students who successfully complete this sequence should follow it with MATH 104 or the 104 equivalent appropriate to their majors. Offered every year.

MATH 109-2  Algebra Found/Appli II    3 sem. hrs.

A two-semester introduction to math at the collegiate level. The first semester focuses on developing foundational math skills while introducing students to basic algebra. The second semester continues the emphasis on skills development but introduces higher-level algebra concepts. Required Weekly tutoring in math in both courses. Equivalent to MATH 100 and MATH 103. Counts toward math proficiency requirement. Course available only to incoming first-year students by placement test. Students who successfully complete this sequence should follow it with MATH 104 or the 104 equivalent appropriate to their majors. Offered every year.

MATH 110  DV:Math in the World    3 sem. hrs.

Explores a broad spectrum of mathematical topics with an emphasis on the many practical uses of mathematics in our society. This is a course in mathematical literacy, not manipulative techniques. Topics are selected from the environment, politics, polling, social ethics, choice and decision making, technology, management, statistics, size, shape and art. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra.

MATH 120  Ethnomathematics    3 sem. hrs.

Indigenous peoples provide examples of the concept of number, related symbols, graph theory (eg. sand paintings), kin relations, games of strategy and chance, logic of puzzles, organization of time and space, spatial configurations.. Cultures selected from South America, Africa, Russia, Australia, Native American, Inuit, Maori. Increases understanding of mathematics and of other peoples. Recommended for non-science majors. Credit in Diversity Cluster. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

MATH 130  DV: Math and the Environme    3 sem. hrs.

Shapes and patterns in nature are examined through various media thereby heightening awareness and appreciation of our environment. A special area of environmental concern, such as air or water quality, is explored in depth through examining data using mathematical modeling and appropriate technology. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered year.

Prerequisite: High school algebra and geometry.

MATH 155  Elementary Functions I    3 sem. hrs.

(Formerly MATH 105-106) Algebraic foundations, functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithms and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, basic trigonometry, trigonometric identities, trigonometric equations, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: two years of high school algebra and one year of high school geometry.

MATH 156  Elementary Functions II    3 sem. hrs.

Algebraic foundations, functions and graphs, polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential functions, logarithms and logarithmic functions, complex numbers, basic trigonometry, trigonometric identities, trigonometric equations, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: MATH 155 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 160  Euclidean Geometry    3 sem. hrs.

Axiomatic and transformational geometry, originated by Euclid, modified by Descartes and others. Points, lines, angles, parallels, planes, space, triangles, polygons, circles, measurement, congruency, similarity, area, volume, coordinates, isometries, constructions. Emphasis on deductive reasoning. Use of ancient tools and modern technology. Foundation for teaching of geometry and further study of modern geometries. Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: high school algebra and geometry.

MATH 207  Calculus I    5 sem. hrs.

Limits, continuity, derivitaves, anti-derivatives, integration and the fundemental theorem of calculus. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: MATH 156 with a grade of "C" or better or placement.

MATH 208  Calculus II    4 sem. hrs.

Transcendental functions, methods of integration, improper integrals, sequences and series, Taylor series, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: MATH 207 with a grade of C or better or placement.

MATH 210  Math for MCE    3 sem. hrs.

This course covers the basic introduction to discrete mathematics and calculus. Concepts include permutations and combinations, sequences and series, graphs, set theory, limits, differentiation, and integration. Historical context will be provided for all topics. This course does not count towards a mathematics major or minor.

Prerequisite: MATH 155 or placement.

MATH 220  Finite Mathematics    3 sem. hrs.

Systems of linear equations; Matrices including basic operations and inverse of a square matrix; Systems of linear inequalities; Linear programming including the simplex method; Logic and Sets; Basic Counting Principles; Permutatuions and Combinations; Elementary probability theory including equiprobable models, conditional probability and Bayes' theorem; Markov Chains including regular Markov Chains and absorbing Markov Chains.

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or equivalent.

MATH 221  Statistics    3 sem. hrs.

Elementary theory of probability and statistics, frequency distributions, binomial distributions, normal distributions, means, variances, standard deviations, sampling, confidence limits, testing of hypotheses, applications drawn from real world situations. Does not count toward the 33 hours required for a major in Mathematics. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: MATH 104 or equivalent.

MATH 230  Discrete Patterns I    3 sem. hrs.

Algorithms and Combinatorics. Logic, circuits, Karnaugh maps. Proofs, including quantified statements and mathematical induction. Relations, graphs, trees. Languages and finite-state machines. Offered every spring.

Prerequisite: MATH 155 or equivalent with permission.

MATH 231  Discrete Patterns II    3 sem. hrs.

Algorithms and Combinatorics. Logic, circuits, Karnaugh maps. Proofs, including quantified statements and mathematical induction. Relations, graphs, trees. Languages and finite-state machines. Offered every fall.

Prerequisite: MATH 230 with a "C" or better.

MATH 255  Complex Variables I    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to complex numbers and their geometry, functions of one complex variable and their differentiation and the fundamental theorem of algebra.

Prerequisite: MATH 207 with a grade of C or better.

MATH 299  Financial Math    3 sem. hrs.

To fill special student needs or take advantage of a visiting professor or serve as an experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. May be repeated as new topics are presented. With permission of department chair.

MATH 307  Calculus III    4 sem. hrs.

Vectors, analytic geometry of three-dimensional space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, theorems of Green and Stokes. Prerequisite MATH 208 with a grade of C or better. Offered every fall semester.

MATH 313  Linear Algebra I    3 sem. hrs.

Concepts, algorithms, proofs and applications over these topics: systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, finite-dimensional vector spaces, eigenvalues, orthogonality, quadratic forms. Related topics may be included such as complex numbers, base transformation, linear programming, and finite-state Markov chains. Offered every fall.

Prerequisite: MATH 207 and MATH 230 or permission of the instructor; MATH 313 is required for the Mathematics major and strongly recommended for the Computer Science major.

MATH 314  Linear Algebra II    3 sem. hrs.

Concepts, algorithms, proofs and applications over these topics: systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, finite-dimensional vector spaces, eigenvalues, orthogonality, quadratic forms. Related topics may be included such as complex numbers, base transformation, linear programming, and finite-state Markov chains. MATH 313 is required for the Mathematics major and strongly recommended for the Computer Science major. Offered spring semester of odd-numbered year.

Prerequisite: Grade of "C" or better in MATH 313.

MATH 321  Prob/Statistical Infer I    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to classical probability theory including sample spaces, events, discrete and continuous probability distributions. Prerequisite for 321: MATH 207 with a grade of C or better. Offered every spring semester.

MATH 322  Prob/Statistical Infer II    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to classical statistics, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and non-parametric statistics. Prerequisite for 322: MATH 321 with a grade of "C" or better. Offered fall semester of even-numbered years.

MATH 340  Theory of Interest    3 sem. hrs.

Measurement of interest, simple and compound interest, present andaccumulated value, amortization, sinking funds, bonds and other securities and practical applications.

Prerequisite: for MATH 208 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 341  Intro to Financial Math    3 sem. hrs.

Advanced topics on bonds and other securities; yield rates, cash flow analysis; the term structure of interest rates; duration, convexity and immunization; and introduction of options and other derivatives.

Prerequisite: MATH 340 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 390  Internship    1-3 sem. hrs.

Interns receive practical learning experience outside the academic setting. This involves structured activities with an internship mentor and faculty mentor working with you to help you gain practical experience in applied mathematics in a corporate or organizational setting. A final report or presentation will be involved. Requires permission of the Director of Mathematics and agreement of the relevant authority on the employer's side. May not be repeated. Offered by arrangement.

MATH 399  Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

To fill special student needs or take advantage of a visiting professor or serve as an experimental offering of a contemplated regular course. May be repeated as new topics are presented. With permission of department chair.

MATH 402  Introduction Modern Geometry    3 sem. hrs.

Study of axiomatic and transformational geometires selected from finite geometry, Euclidean geometry, projective geometry, non-Euclidean geometries, fractal geometry, and topology. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: MATH 313 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 405  Intro to Modern Analysis I    3 sem. hrs.

Logic and proofs applied to continuous domains. Sets, functions and coordinality. Natural numbers and induction; ordered fields and the completeness axiom and compact sets. Sequences: convergence, limit theorems, monotone and cauchy sequences, subsequences. Offered fall semester of odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: MATH 230 and MATH 307 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 406  Intro to Modern Analysis II    3 sem. hrs.

Limits and continuity, uniform continuity; differentiation, I'Hopital's Rule, Taylor's theorem; the Riemann intergral and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; infinite series and convergence tests; sequences and series of functions. Offered times depend on demand.

Prerequisite: MATH 405 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 410  Elem Differential Equations    3 sem. hrs.

Equations of first and second orders, linear equations with constant coefficients, solutions in series, numerical approximations. Offered spring semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: MATH 313, 307 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 421  Introduction Modern Algebra I    3 sem. hrs.

Theoretical, axiomatic approach to algebraic structures. Mappings, equivalence relations, groups, homomorphisms, rings, ideals. Offered fall semester of even-numbered years.

Prerequisite: MATH 313 and 307 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 422  Introduction Modern Algebra II    3 sem. hrs.

Continuation of MATH 421. Groups, rings, ideals, fields, integral domains, polynomials, vector spaces. Offered times depend on demand.

Prerequisite: MATH 421 with a grade of "C" or better.

MATH 431  App Regression&Time Series Ana    3 sem. hrs.

Applied Regression Analysis emphasizes the concepts and the analysis of data sets. It provides a review of the key concepts in simple linear regression, matrix operations, and multiple regression. Methods and criteria for selecting regression variables and geometric interpretations are discussed. Polynomial, trigonometric, analysis of variance, nonlinear, time series, logistic, random effects, and mixed effects models are also discussed. Detailed case studies and exercises based on real data sets are used to reinforce the concepts.

MATH 450  Math Seminar    1 sem. hr.

Reading of mathematical papers or monographs and presentations of subjects at baccalaureate level. Disseminating and writing of level appropriate proofs. Must be taken three times to satisfy the major requirements. Offered every semester.

MATH 490  Independent Study/Research    3 sem. hrs.

With permission of the Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. By arrangement.

Natural Science

NS 101  T1:DV:Sci/Contemp Hlth Iss    3 sem. hrs.

Primary emphasis on facilitating an understanding of the value of science and the use of the scientific method in problem solving, exploring the dynamics of human physiology, and evaluating health-related physiological activities. Important health issues and related contributions from the sciences are investigated. A variety of viewpoints and theories are examined in depth rather than from any one particular perspective. Trends in current research are important in both classroom discussion and course-related projects. Offered every semester.

NS 103  T1:Environmental Science    3 sem. hrs.

A course for students interested in environmental issues (greenhouse effect, waste disposal and energy management, recycling, deforestation, etc.), ecology, and applications affecting life processes on earth. In addition to an in-depth look at the synergy of the interacting life processes inextricably linked with the earth, the effects of human behavior on that synergy are explored. A variety of viewpoints, theories, and strategies are considered. Course includes a balance of research-based information, practical knowledge and applications, and opportunity to use the scientific method in course-related projects. Offered every semester.

NS 103L  Environmental Science:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This course is to be taken by Environmental Science majors only. It is a more in-depth look at an introduction to environmental science to prepare ES majors for the next level of courses. Offered every semester in conjunction with NS 103.

NS 104  T1:Physical Science    3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the principles and concepts ofphysics and chemistry. In physics, Motion, Energy, Heat and Temperature,Waves, Electricity, and Light are discussed. In chemistry, Atoms,Bonds, Reactions, Water and Solutions, and Nuclear Chemistry arediscussed. Hands-on laboratory experiences are included in this threecredit course.

Prerequisite: MATH 104.

NS 105  T1:Introduction to Geology    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to principles and concepts of earth science, including plate tectonics, oceans, glaciers, soils, earthquakes, earth's crust, volcanic activity, and geological record of minerals and how the earth was formed. Other related topics will be presented as time permits. This is a physical science course. Offered every spring semester.

NS 105L  Intro to Geology Lab    1 sem. hr.

NS 109  T1:DV:Technology/Society    3 sem. hrs.

Where has technology brought us, and what will 21st century technology look like? What kind of scientific foundation is needed for this technology? This course will briefly survey the history of technology and its effects on societies past and present. Students will identify emerging technologies the science needed for those technologies, and examine the effects on individuals, families, work, and society as a whole. Next offered TBA.

NS 110  Plagues Engineered by Humans    3 sem. hrs.

The past and future effects of plagues on humankind will be discussed. This course will explore the possibilities of plagues that may be unleased knowingly and perhaps innocently. No prerequisite.

NS 111  T1:Plants,Foods,Medici & Texti    3 sem. hrs.

A study of plants useful to humans with emphasis on medicinal and agriculutral uses. Issues covered will include the origins of domestication, the role in nature of plant products and the ways these plant products have been altered by humans through artificial selection and genetic modifications. Offered spring semester.

NS 112  T1:Science for ECE    3 sem. hrs.

This course will introduce students to select topics in life sciences, physical sciences, and Earth and space sciences which are addressed in Ohio Early Childhood Learning Standards. Each topic will be paired with inquiry activities that allow students to participate in hands-on applications. Discussions will include how to integrate this science content with other disciplines and how to design simple experiments. Offered every spring semester.

NS 114  T1:Intro to Forensic Science    3 sem. hrs.

This introductory course will focus on a variety of forensic sciences and their application to crime scene investigation. The course begins with an introduction to forensic science, crime scene investigation, nature of evidence, and an overview of chemistry. Patterns and impressions include fingerprints, firearms, and tool marks. The forensic biology topics include pathology, anthropology, odontology, and entomology. The forensic chemistry topics include illicit drugs, fibers and otherpolymers, accelerants, and explosives. Group activities serve to supplementthese topics and encourage critical thinking. Offered every fall and summer online.

NS 119  T1:Microbes & Society    3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the world of microorganisms and how they impact humans of the 21st century. Topics that will be discussed include the place of microbes in ecology and the environment, the uses of microbes in biotechnology, the role of microbes in food production, and numerous other ways that microbes contribute to the quality of our lives. The course also explores bioterrorism, theproblem of antibiotic resistance, and surveys microbial diseases of history and contemporary times. Some lab exercises included in the class meeting time. NOT INTENDED FOR SCIENCE OR NURSING MAJORS.

NS 175  Great Biographies of Science    3 sem. hrs.

Course description unavailable.

NS 207  Nutrition    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to basic principles of normal nutrition. Topics include composition of food groups relative to fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements; specific functions of these components; the four food groups and six food exchanges; some of the current controversial diets and issues in nutrition. Open to all students. Offered every semester.

NS 210  T1:Astronomy/Planetary Sci    3 sem. hrs.

This course includes theories of the origin of the universe and its large-scale structure. Discussion will include the laws which govern the behavior of matter and energy throughout the universe. We will describe various objects and systems which are the subjects of astronomy. We will survey the techniques used by astronomers in their study of the cosmos. Students will learn about solar systems, the physics of planetary systems, the discovery of solar systems outside our own , and a survey of the components of our own solar system. Offered every fall semester.

NS 215  T1:Forensic Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will focus on a variety of topics in forensic chemistry and the analysis of evidence. An overview of drugs and pharmacology will be presented with an emphasis on forensic drug analysis. The chemical analysis of physical evidence includes the chemistry of combustion, arson, color, colorants, inks, paints, and polymers. The forensic analysis of paper, fibers, and polymers will also be covered in this course. Group activities serve to supplement these topics and encouragecritical thinking. Open to all students. Offered every spring online.