Division of Humanities

Government and Foreign Affairs

GFA 103  T1:DV:American Government    3 sem. hrs.

Foundations of American government; the Constitution, political parties, federal system, legislative, executive and judicial branches, including the election process, interest groups and the media. Offered every fall and spring semester.

GFA 205  State and Local Government    3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of the relationship of state and local governments to the federal government. Responsibilities and roles provided by these governments, the growth of state and local government in the modern age. Next offered Spring 2021 and Spring 2023.

GFA 207  DV:Campaigns & Elections    3 sem. hrs.

An in-depth look at our electoral system and the methods used by trained political operatives to elect candidates. Examines candidate selection, campaign strategy, planning and fundraising. Includes discussion of fieldwork, media operations, political polling, the role of interest groups and ethical implications of the current electoral system. Next offered Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Fall 2021.

GFA 209  T1:DV:World Regional Geography    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces students to the major regions of the world. Special emphasis is given to the political, economic, and environmental conditions of the regions as well as the social, cultural and demographic characteristics that are in part a product of those conditions. Some themes running throughout the course include globalization, environmental change, and diversity. Offered every fall and spring semester.

GFA 213  H2b:DV:Comparative Politics    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the comparative study of politics, policy, and economies of selected regions, with attention given to political structure, function, parties, and political culture. Offered every spring semester.

GFA 214  Introduction to Research    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces students to the nature of political inquiry including basic theories, methods, and approaches used in government and foreign affairs. To be taken the first semester of the sophomore year. This is a prerequisite for GFA 215. Offered every fall semester.

GFA 215  Research Methods    3 sem. hrs.

Classroom and lab introduction to methodology of quantitative political research from hypothesis formation, operationalization and measurement, data collection and coding to analysis and interpretation, with attention to theory of scientific inquiry and approaches to political research. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: GFA 214.

GFA 215L  Scope & Methods:Lab    0 sem. hrs.

GFA 241  H1:Urban Politics    3 sem. hrs.

Analyzes the power relationships that exist within the urban environment. After discussion of the historical, social and political development of the city with the United States, the course makes use of an extensive simulation of a city council concerning multiple issues faced by a mid-sized, midwestern city. Students will gain first-hand knowledge of urban politics through role-playing and political interaction. Next offered Spring 2020, Spring 2023.

GFA 245  The Law and the Legal System    3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the politics of law. We will examine what roles the legal bar and the judiciary play in the U.S. political system. Topics to be discussed include the structure of the judicial branch of government at the state and federal levels, the legal education, the legal community, civil and criminal litigation, and the policymaking role of appellate courts. The course is designed as an introductory survey course and as preparation for the 400-level law and politics courses. This course can serve as a capstone course for GFA majors. Offered every fall semester.

GFA 299  H1:DV:Genocide in Modern Times    3 sem. hrs.

The last two centuries have seen mass violence, including genocide, mass murder, and other atrocities on a scale unprecedented in human history. In this course we examine the definition of genocide, the psychology of genocide, and consider theoretical approaches that seek to explain these atrocities. We also examine individual cases of genocide and attempts to prevent genocide. Next offered Fall 2019 and Fall 2021.

GFA 301  H1:DV:World Politics    3 sem. hrs.

Study of basic aspects of international politics, evolution of the modern state system, national power, and the role of international organizations. International conflict and its management by political and legal means, as well as contemporary international issues, are studied. Offered fall semester.

GFA 303  H2b:American Political Thought    3 sem. hrs.

This course begins with a survey of political thought concerning the role of the state and/or government and the individual's role in that state from Plato to Hobbes. Significant attention is then given to the formation of the American view of authority and the role of the individual. Emphasis is placed on Locke's Second Treatise of Government as well as American writings such as Common Sense, the Federalist Papers, the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Next offered Fall 2018, Fall 202, Spring 2022.

GFA 305  H2b:West Europe/European Union    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to familiarize students with the societies, political institutions and public policies of post-WWII Western Europe. Primary emphasis will be the "big four" (Britain, Germany, France, and Italy), but may also include a look at smaller countries. Attention will be given to the integration phenomenon and the role of the European Union. Focus will be placed on comprehension of the historical uniqueness of this development that has resulted in the EU and now provides a potential model for economic and social policy within regional and global integration frameworks. Next offered Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Fall 2022.

GFA 309  Politics of Asia    3 sem. hrs.

This course offers a survey of comparative politics of Asia. Focus will be placed on the economic growth in Asia that has brought tens of millions out of poverty and brought wealth to the region's nations. Asia is fast becoming a key driver of the global economy. Increased economic power is transferable into political and military power. Attention will be given to China's growing power, changes to the current balance of power and the United States' role in the region. Next offered Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023.

GFA 311  DV:Govt/Politics in Latin Amer    3 sem. hrs.

This course offers an introduction to Latin America by exploring the history, cultures, and contemporary issues facing this multifaceted region as a whole, as well as individual countries. Part of the course will focus on U.S. Latin America relations and interactions - both as states and as people. This course includes colonization, race, class, and gender as inequalities that are important dimensions for understanding social life and communities. Next offered Spring 2020, Spring 2022.

GFA 312  H1:SL:The Border:US-Mexican    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the complex relationship between the United States and Mexico - neighbors that are closely integrated and yet separated. We will look at this relationship at the U.S. - Mexican border region and consider how this integration and separation impacts our political relationship as we address immigration policy and the militarization of the border; our economic relationship (especially NAFTA); and social and cultural cohesion and fragmentation. The course includes a trip to Laredo, TX and Nuervo Laredo, Mexico.

GFA 323  H1:DV:Public Policy    3 sem. hrs.

In-depth analysis of selected domestic policy issues handled by the American national government: social security, tax reform, military spending, federal education programs, agricultural policy, environmental policy, energy proposals, and transportation programs. Problematic settings, goals and alternative solutions are examined. Next offered Spring 2019, Spring 2022.

GFA 355  H1:American Foreign Policy    3 sem. hrs.

Organization, control and functioning of the foreign policy of the United States; the impact of internal and external forces on the formulation and implementation of foreign policy; analysis of problems confronting the United States in foreign affairs. Next offered Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Fall 2022.

GFA 375  H3:Politics and Film    3 sem. hrs.

This course looks at film to explain both the way in which films influence political ideas, beliefs, and behaviors and also our political beliefs and ideas as they influence our perception and understanding of film. Offered every fall semester.

GFA 381  The Legislative Process    3 sem. hrs.

Structure and behavior of American national and state legislative systems; recruitment, election and behavior of legislators; the impact of constituencies, parties, interest groups, and other factors on the legislative policy-making process; theories of representation; and legislative reform. Next offered Spring 2021.

GFA 383  The American Presidency    3 sem. hrs.

Institutions, personalities, and political processes centered in the Presidency, implications of the shifting balance of powers between the Presidency and the other federal branches, analysis of media and public expectations in the light of effective leadership and public accountability. Next offered Fall 2018, Fall 2020, Fall 2022.

GFA 400  Comprehensive Review    1 sem. hr.

Provides students with the review of materials in preparation for the exit exam, cutting across all areas of the curriculum including theory, history and application issues. First semester senior year. Offered every Fall semester.

GFA 401  H3:DV:Povty & Prspty in Dev Wd    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the process of development - defined as social, economic, and political modernizaiton - in the developing world. It provides an introduction to some of the problems of developing states. Reasons for and obstacles to development are discussed as are policies used to address these problems. This course can serve as a capstone course for GFA majors. Next offered Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023.

GFA 403  H2b:Constitutional Law    3 sem. hrs.

An examination of the Supreme Court as an institution, with special emphasis on landmark cases in the areas of judicial review, equal protection and criminal law. The course makes use of the "case method" for understanding the role of the Supreme Court in the American political system as well as some of the controversies surrounding the Court's power to declare laws unconstitutional. This course can serve as a capstone course for GFA majors. Next offered Fall 2019, Fall 2021.

GFA 405  H3:DV:CivilRight&Libert    3 sem. hrs.

A survey of the important cases in the basic freedoms guaranteed by the First Amendment to the Constitution. The course makes use of the "case method'" for understanding the development of law in the areas of freedom of speech, press and religion, obscenity and censorship. Next offered Spring 2020, Spring 2022.

GFA 409  H1:InternPoliti Econ    3 sem. hrs.

This course will analyze the political and economic implications of international economic relations and the theories underpinning topics such as trade, aid, foreign investment, monetary relations, and technology transfers. Theoretical orientations include liberal economic theory, dependency and world systems theory. Next offered Fall 2019, Fall 2021.

GFA 411  Leadership    3 sem. hrs.

Using a case-based approach, Public Administration attempts to discover what we can expect of our varied government servants and the complex organizations within which they work. The course will examine organizational theory, intergovernmental relations, personnel systems, employee motivation, as well as public-choice economics, budgets, and administrative reforms. The primary goal of the course is to provide each student with real-world skills that are essential for success in the field of public administration. Next offered Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023.

GFA 413  International Organization    3 sem. hrs.

Analysis of the development and general characteristics, functions, procedures and problems of international governmental organizations. Specifically, the role of the United Nations and regional organizations as political institutions in a changing system will be examined.

GFA 415  H3:International Law    3 sem. hrs.

Nature and principles of international law, with special emphasis on changing concepts and conflicting claims in the evolution of rule for the international community. Includes principles and procedures for international disputes. This course can serve as a capstone course for GFA and IR majors. Next offered Spring 2020, Spring 2022.

GFA 421  Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

Intensive examination of selected, single topics in government and politics.

GFA 422  CL:ST:Vatican Politics    3 sem. hrs.

Intensive examination of selected, single topics in government and politics.

GFA 423  Special Topics    1-4 sem. hrs.

Intensive examination of selected, single topics in government and politics.

GFA 425  Readings & Individual Investig    1-6 sem. hrs.

Directed readings, tutorials, directed and independent research, etc. With permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Offered every semester.

GFA 426  Readings & Individual Investig    1-6 sem. hrs.

Directed readings, tutorials, directed and independent research, etc. With permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Offered every semester.

GFA 427  Readings & Individual Investig    1-6 sem. hrs.

Directed readings, tutorials, directed and independent research, etc. With permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Offered every semester.

GFA 430  Internship I    3 sem. hrs.

Supervised work experience in federal, state, and local government. Offered every semester.

GFA 431  Internship II    3 sem. hrs.

Supervised work experience in federal, state, and local government. Offered every semester.

History

HIST 101  T1:DV:World Civil to 1500    3 sem. hrs.

Survey of the origins of global civilizations through ancient and medieval times until the beginnings of the modern age. Offered every fall semester.

HIST 102  T1:DV:World Civil 1500 to Pres    3 sem. hrs.

Survey of the political, economic, religious, social and intellectual forces which have shaped early modern and modern people. Offered every spring semester.

HIST 103  T1:DV:Hist of the U.S. to 1877    3 sem. hrs.

Survey of colonial and middle periods in the development of the United States of America to 1877. Offered every fall semester.

HIST 104  T1:DV:Hist of U.S. since 1877    3 sem. hrs.

Survey of the political, economic, religious, social, and intellectual history of the United States of America from 1877 to the present. Offered every spring semester.

HIST 204  H2b:Diplo Hist U.S. since 1877    3 sem. hrs.

Survey of the origins, development, and leading ideas of American foreign policy from 1877 to the present. Next offered TBA.

HIST 205  American Colonial History    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the growth of political and economic institutions, social forms and ideals, cultural patterns, and diplomatic policies from 1607-1815. Next offered TBA.

HIST 208  H2b:The Fren Revolut and Napo    3 sem. hrs.

The causes, course and interpretations of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, and the creation of "modernity" in France and England, including the modern Western political ideologies of liberalism, conservatism, and socialism. Next offered TBA.

HIST 210  Intro to Research and Writing    3 sem. hrs.

Required for all History majors. This course will focus on the skills necessary to the practice of history methods, including the analysis and interpretation of both primary and secondary sources, historiography, research skills, and writing. Offered every spring semester.

HIST 220  History of Ohio    3 sem. hrs.

Surveys the history of the state of Ohio from the settlements of indigenous peoples to the present day. Special focus is placed on the political, social, and military history of the state. Next offered Fall 2018 and Fall 2020.

HIST 223  H2b:Cultrl Encounter Glob Wld    3 sem. hrs.

This course will focus upon Islam and the "West", particularly looking at themes ranging from geopolitics to terrorism to migration. The goal of the course is to establish a better understanding of Islam and provide students an opportunity to find common and mutual understanding.

HIST 224  H2b:Military History of the US    3 sem. hrs.

A survey of both the military experiences and issues in United States history. The course will explore the major wars and battles as well as the impact of war on the economy, technological developments, politics, diplomatic relations, society, and other factors that have influenced the military aspects of American history from the American Revolution to the late 20th century. Next offered TBA.

HIST 225  T1:DV:African-American History    3 sem. hrs.

A survey of African-American History, concentrating upon the black experience in the United States. Black America from African and West Indian origins to the present. Offered every fall semester.

HIST 227  DV:T1:Glob Pers in Gender Hist    3 sem. hrs.

An introduction of the history of gender, gender roles, and the power relations across the world and over time, with a focus on how gender has structured social, religious, economic, and political relationships. Next offered TBA.

HIST 240  H1:US in the Long 19th Century    3 sem. hrs.

This course will provide a survey of the key political, military, and social issues that shaped the United States from the American Revolution in the late 18th century through the early years of the 20th century. Next offered Spring 2020 and Spring 2022.

HIST 250  H2b:American Catholic History    3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the history of Catholics in America from the first Spanish and French missions, through the migrations of Catholics from diverse backgrounds, the coming-of-age of the American Catholic community, to the participation in and response to The Second Vatican Council by American Catholics. Next offered Spring 2020.

HIST 290  Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

Intensive examination of selected, single topics in History. This course is offered as a means of providing unique topics in history, depending upon the interests or needs of students.

HIST 290-1  BLSJ:T1:ST:Policy Through Hist    3 sem. hrs.

Once considered dead, America's cities have experienced rebound. The rejuvenation has been uneven, however, and cities still face many of the challenges that have plagued them for decades, including concentrated poverty and glaring inequality, a lack of affordable, adequate housing, racial segregation, and environmental sustainability. This class examines what citizens can do to address the problems cities face. It's a course in history, policy analysis, and social justice.

HIST 308  H2b:Hist of the Ancient World    3 sem. hrs.

Religious, economic, philosophical, and political features of the ancient world from earliest times to the fall of Rome. Next offered TBA.

HIST 309  H2b:Hist of Medieval Europe    3 sem. hrs.

Emergence and development of western European civilization out of Christian, Greco-Roman, and Germanic institutions and ideas. Next offered TBA.

HIST 310  H2b:Hist of Early Mode Europe    3 sem. hrs.

A survey of European history from the Renaissance to the French Revolution, emphasizing the transformation from "medieval" to "modern" in European political, social, religious, cultural and intellectual life. Next offered TBA.

HIST 311  H2b: History of Modern Europe    3 sem. hrs.

Systematic analysis of the origin and development of main trends, factors, and problems in the history of modern Europe: liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, Industrial Revolution, imperial rivalries, emerging nationalism, rise of communism, era of world wars, and problems of the contemporary world. Next offered Fall 2019 and Fall 2021.

HIST 313  H1:Rise/Fall of Nazi Germany    3 sem. hrs.

A study of the origins, course, and collapse of the Third Reich including the politics of genocide. Next offered TBA.

HIST 318  H1:DV:Indust Revol in World    3 sem. hrs.

Examines the Industrial Revolution from a global perspective with special emphasis on the social, environmental and public health impact of industrialization. The course covers the effects of the Industrial Revolution from its eighteenth-century origins to the modern day. Next offered Spring 2021.

HIST 323  H2B: Modern Britain    3 sem. hrs.

Topics and themes in the making of modern Britain, from 1500-present, including the development of Parliament, the monarchy, British society and culture, religion, and the origins of the British Empire. Next offered TBA.

HIST 325  Civil War & Reconstruction    3 sem. hrs.

Examines the causes, course, and consequences of the U.S. Civil War from a political, military, social, economic, and cultural perspective. Next offered TBA.

HIST 328  Gilded & Progressive Age Ameri    3 sem. hrs.

Examines American history from the Civil War into the 20th century, including issues of industrialization and labor, the creation of an urban society, and changing views of society. Next offered Spring 2022.

HIST 334  H2b:Constitutional Hist of US    3 sem. hrs.

A survey of the Constituitional history of the United States from the background of the Colonial Era to the late 20th century. Next offered TBA.

HIST 335  H1:U.S. in the 20th Century    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the political, social, and economic development of the United States since 1898 and America's rise to world power. Next offered Fall 2019 and Fall 2021.

HIST 336  DV: Govt & Pol in Mod Latin Am    3 sem. hrs.

This course offers an introduction to Latin America by exploring the history, cultures, and contemporary issues facing this multifaceted region as a whole, as well as individual countries. Part of the course will focus on U.S. Latin America relations and interactions - both as states and as people. This course includes colonization, race, class, and gender as inequalities that are important dimensions for understanding social life and communities. Next offered Spring 2020 and Spring 2022.

HIST 337  DV: History of Mod Middle East    3 sem. hrs.

Historical introduction to the problems of the Middle East, emphasizing importance of these areas for an understanding of the modern world's problems. Next offered Fall 2018, Fall 2020 and Spring 2021.

HIST 338  DV:History of Modern Africa    3 sem. hrs.

Examines modern African history from European colonization through post-colonization and independence. This course focuses particularly on African politics, the impact of ethnic violence, and economics. Next offered Spring 2021.

HIST 339  DV:History of Modern Asia    3 sem. hrs.

Topics and themes emerging from the political, philosophical, religious, artistic, and literary hertitage of East Asia or South Asia, emphasizing the importance of the civilizations in these regions for an understanding of the modern world's problems. Next offered Spring 2020 and Spring 2022.

HIST 350  H2b:American Catholic History    3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the history of Catholics in America from the first Spanish and French missions, through the migrations of Catholics from diverse backgrounds, the coming-of-age of the American Catholic community, to the participation in and response to The Second Vatican Council by American Catholics.

HIST 380  Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

An in-depth examination of a unique topic in History. This course is designed to meet the specific needs of students in History, based upon student interest and demand.

HIST 385  Internship    1-3 sem. hrs.

Professional experience using the skills developed in the history major. Prerequisite requirements: student must have completed at least 12 hours of course work in History, have a 2.75 GPA in the major, and have an overall GPA of 2.5. Offered every semester.

HIST 400  Senior Seminar Capstone    3 sem. hrs.

The nature of historical judgment and interpretation, the roles of evidence, approach and presupposition. Designed to give majors experience in the analysis of historical problems through a reading and research program. The culmination of the course is a research paper in which students utilize many of the primary and secondary sources that productive scholars use in preparing their own papers, articles and books for presentation to the broader academic community. Required of history majors. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: HIST 210.

HIST 403  H2b:Constitutional Law    3 sem. hrs.

An examination of the Supreme Court as an institution, with special emphasis on landmark cases in the areas of judicial review, equal protection and criminal law. The course makes use of the "case method" for understanding the role of the Supreme Court in the American political system as well as some of the controversies surrounding the Court's power to declare laws unconstitutional. Cross-listed as GFA 403. Next offered Fall 2019 and Fall 2021.

HIST 408  H2b: Sports & Soc in US Hist    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines American sport and society from the modern era to the present. This is a 400-level class; therefore, this final project will be a primary-source driven research paper on an American sport history topic of the student's choice. Next offered Spring 2020 and Spring 2022.

HIST 410  DV: Aspects East Asian Civil    3 sem. hrs.

Next offered TBA.

HIST 413  H2b:Europ Intellect Hist    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the main ideas which have shaped the mind of the modern person and an analysis of the relation of these ideas to the process of historical development. Next offered TBA.

HIST 425  Readings in History    1-3 sem. hrs.

Special topics and reading in history. Offered by arrangement with permission of Division Chair and the Dean.

HIST 428  H3: History of Medicine    3 sem. hrs.

This reading intensive course will examine the development of modern Western medicine through a survey of its intellectual traditions and technological roots, as well as a critical analysis of its impact on the modern world. Next offered TBA.

HIST 430  H3:Sem Hist of War & Society    3 sem. hrs.

This reading intensive course will cover the social, political, cultural, and economic dimensions of war, focusing not on battles but on the relationship between war and social change, the impact that the home front can have on military actions, and the interaction between cultures that war creates. Next offered TBA.

HIST 435  H2b:The Papacy    3 sem. hrs.

This course is a seminar in the history of the Papacy. Topics may include the development of papal institutions, church-state relations, contributions to development of Catholic doctrine, the Papacy as an agent of historical change, the Papacy and ecumenism, and Church reactions to and engagement with modernity. Next offered TBA.

HIST 438  H3:Sem Case Stds in Genocide    3 sem. hrs.

This reading intensive course will explore the topic of genocide as a theme in world history by looking at one or more historical examples from various eras and geographic locations. Next offered TBA.

HIST 440  H3:Sem US Race/Class/Gender    3 sem. hrs.

This reading intensive course will explore a specific historical topic or theme that interrogates how race or ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped and affected society in the United States. Next offered TBA.

Humanities

HUM 200  Experiential Learning Assess    1 sem. hr.

This course is designed to help students assess their experiential learning background. Theories of adult learning and learning styles will be explored and applied to personal and work settings. Students will prepare an autobiographical Personal Learning Theme and an Experiential Learning Portfolio demonstrating their knowledge, skills, and experiences. Designed especially for non-traditional students. Offered by arrangement. Requires authorization from student's academic advisor.

HUM 201  Humanities Research & Writing    1 sem. hr.

Provides students in the Humanities and other disciplines foundations for conducting independent research using library resources, including use of reference materials, locating sources, and using electronic databases. Offered every spring.

HUM 220  DV:Found Interdiscip Study    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines current topics from several different disciplinary perspectives, with the goal of showing how these perspectives inform and enhance one another. Drawing on materials from the humanities, the social sciences, and the physical sciences, the course explores issues relating to self and society, the American way, and the global community. The interdisciplinary approach will then be continued as students take courses in a thematic cluster. Offered every semester.

HUM 230  Special Topics    1 sem. hr.

A course offered by students for students with varying topics. The topics are chosen by the student teacher and designed to have personal application.

HUM 400  Interdisciplinary Seminar    3 sem. hrs.

Examines an idea from the various points of view of different disciplines to give a student a broad understanding of a particular topic through lectures, discussions, and individual research. Emphasis on interrelation of ideas and integration of knowledge.

Prerequisite: Junior or senior status with a minimum 2.5 GPA.

HUM 401  Integrative Project - Gen Stud    2,3 sem. hrs.

Examines an idea from the various points of view of different disciplines to give a student a broad understanding of a particular topic through lectures, discussions, and individual research. Emphasis on interrelation of ideas and integration of knowledge. Next offering TBA.

Prerequisite: Junior and senior status with a minimum 2.5 GPA.

Philosophy

PHIL 100  T1:Introduction to Philosophy    3 sem. hrs.

By examining Socrates, Plato and other representative philosophers, this course introduces students to selected philosophical problems, historical issues, and philosophical positions. Offered every semester.

PHIL 103  T1:Intro to Art of Thinking    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed to identify, evaluate and compose persuasive deductive and inductive arguments in natural language.

PHIL 110  T1:FromSocr-Spiel:PhilThroFilm    3 sem. hrs.

Course examines the major fields of Philosophy through texts and contemporary films. Offered every semester.

PHIL 202  T1:DV:Phil of Human Nature    3 sem. hrs.

Since human nature may be understood and explained in a variety of ways, students in this course will examine the meaning and uniqueness of human nature, its various explanations, distinctive features and main controversies. Offered every semester.

PHIL 203  T1:DV:Moral Philosophy    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the meaning of human happiness and the ethical norms necessary for attaining it. Discussions include the ethical virtues and the meanings of such concepts as good/evil and right/wrong. Selected moral problems and ethical theories are also explored. Offered every semester.

PHIL 230  Environmental Ethics & Policy    3 sem. hrs.

The principle aim of this course is to develop the analytical tools necessary to understand the ethical issues that arise in the context of public policy decisions regarding environmental protection.

PHIL 251  T1: Symbolic Logic    3 sem. hrs.

This course will give an account of the relation of logical consequence by employing the systems of sentential logic as well as first-order predicate logic. Students will learn how to represent the logical forms in English arguments, and develop a semantics as well as a system of natural deduction in order to determine the validity of arguments given such formal representations. This approach will familiarize the student with proof-theoretic concepts and techniques, providing a means for analyzing and evaluating natural language arguments.

PHIL 255  H1:DV:Phil of Human Sexuality    3 sem. hrs.

This course considers human sexuality from a philosophical perspective using both Ancient and Contemporary texts for conceptual and normative analysis of topics such as sex and love.

PHIL 275  H1:Environmental Philosophy    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the interdisciplinary approach to environmental studies. It examines the metaphysical, ethical, political, social, aesthetic and scientific dimensions of current and historical environmental issues at the local and global scale. It is a required course for the interdisciplinary minor in environmental studies.

PHIL 290  DV:H1:Special Topics    3 sem. hrs.

A course focusing on special topics in philosophy and designed to address specific curricula needs and/or faculty/student interests. Offered on demand

PHIL 301  Philosophy of Knowledge    3 sem. hrs.

After examining the nature of knowledge and the conditions that make knowledge possible, students will study the various theoretical accounts of what constitutes genuine knowing. Also examined are the problems of meaning and truth, the role of intuition and affective experience and the influences of society, art and language. Next offered Fall 2020.

PHIL 302  Metaphysics    3 sem. hrs.

This course provides students an opportunity to study the nature, origin and structures of reality as determined through various Ancient, Modern and/or Contemporary philosophers. The nature of God, causality, essence and existence, truth and being are explored within a historical context. Next offered Spring 2019.

PHIL 303  H2b:DV:Philosophy of Art    3 sem. hrs.

Through the writings of various philosophers and by responding to a number of works of art, this course examines the notions of beauty, form, aesthetic experience, the creative process and the nature of art. Next offered Fall 2019.

PHIL 304  H3:Bioethics    3 sem. hrs.

Interdisciplinary study of what science can do and what science ought to do. Exponential advances in medical-scientific knowledge and technology present many questions and problems that must be considered from the viewpoint of philosophical ethics. Problems such as forgoing medical treatment, surrogate decision-making, euthanasia, confidentiality and human experimentation are considered. Offered every semester.

PHIL 305  Philosophy of God    3 sem. hrs.

A study of the various philosophical traditions concerning the proofs of God's existence, the nature of Divinity, and the human/cosmic relationship to the Divine. Offered on demand.

PHIL 308  H1:Great Transformations    3 sem. hrs.

Next offered TBA.

PHIL 312  H2b:DV:Political Philosophy    3 sem. hrs.

A study of major philosophical positions concerning society's nature and purpose. Classical, Christian, Renaissance, Modern and Contemporary political and social philosophies are studied. Selected problems include the methods and norms of social organization, the relationship between the individual and society, law and rights, the goals and purposes of government, and the nature and role of a just state. Next offered Fall 2018 and Fall 2020.

PHIL 315  H2b:Ancient/MedievalPhilosophy    3 sem. hrs.

General survey of the major thinkers and issues of the ancient and Hellenistic periods. Next offered Fall 2019.

PHIL 316  H2b:Renaiss & Mod Philosophy    3 sem. hrs.

General survey of the major thinkers and issues of the Renaissance and Modern periods. Next offered Spring 2020.

PHIL 317  H2b:Contemporary Philosophy    3 sem. hrs.

General survey of the major thinkers and issues of the contemporary periods. Next offered Spring 2019.

PHIL 350  H2b:Philosophy of Medicine    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the epistemological study of health and disease and the evolution of the medical model. Discussions will concentrate on identifying and defining key biophilosophical concepts including: the nature of illness, the goals and limitations of medical research, and the social and moral issues that arise at the intersection of science and philosophy. Offered every semester.

PHIL 405  H2b:Philosophy Symposium    3 sem. hrs.

The Symposium course is taught in conjunction biannually with the Philosophy/Theology Symposium. Students will participate in the "Great Questions" dialogue as part of the Symposium. Offered every spring.

PHIL 406  Internship Adv Clin Bioethics    3 sem. hrs.

Designed to be a supervised internship that provides an immersion experience where students can observe the clinical issues that arise in the clinical setting, primarily within critical care. Students may be exposed to the following types of topics: advance directives, hospice, surrogate decision making, Do Not Resuscitate orders, medical futility, artificial nutrition and hydration, forgoing medical treatment. Two hours per week are spent on site at Aultman Hospital and one hour per week is didactic on campus. It is offered on demand by arrangement with permission from both a Walsh instructor and the Philosophy and Theology Division Chair, as well as the supervisor of the off-campus site.

Prerequisite: PHIL 304 Bioethics.

PHIL 407  H2b:ST in Applied Ethics    3-6 sem. hrs.

Examines specific topics in the field of applied ethics. Offered on demand.

PHIL 408  H3:Sem:Selected Topics in Phil    3 sem. hrs.

Intensive examination of a philosophical problem selected from any of the systematic areas. The seminar's major concentration is individual investigation and discussion of the results of that research. This course may be taken twice in a four-year period since the topic is different each time. Offered on demand.

PHIL 409  Sem: Selected Philosophers    3 sem. hrs.

Examines specific topics in Philosophy. Offered on demand.

PHIL 410  Capstone Seminar    3 sem. hrs.

Designed to give majors experience in philosophical analysis through a reading and research program. The culmination of the course is a research papers in which students utilize many of the primary and secondary sources in the philosophical canon. Required of Philosophy majors. Offered every Spring semester.

PHIL 490  Readings/Research in Phil    3 sem. hrs.

Directed readings and discussion of specific philosophical texts or topics. Available as needed.

Prerequisites: Permission of the Division Chair and the Vice President for Academic Affairs is required.

Theology

THEO 105  DV:Comparative Religions    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the history, practices, and teachings of Christianity and other major religions of the world (e.g., Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism). This is currently offered as an online course.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 106  T1:Script & the Catholic Trad    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores Sacred Scripture and Church Tradition as the dual sources of revelation for the Christian faith. Students will acquire a fundamental understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics, theological anthropology, and Church teaching. They will also apply critical thinking skills to theological inquiry.This course is the mandatory Tier 1 requirement for all students at Walsh University and is offered every semester.

THEO 200  H2a:Christian Theology to 1500    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the development of Christian thought from the time of the New Testament to the Protestant Reformation. Students will reinforce their critical thinking skills, reflect upon the work of the Holy Spirit in the history of the Catholic Church, and deepen their awareness of the Church's continual pursuit of truth through faith and reason. Offered in sequence with THEO 201.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 201  H2a:Christian Theo/1500 to Pre    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the development of Christian thought from the time of the Protestant Reformation to the present-day. Students will reinforce their critical thinking skills, reflect upon the work of the Holy Spirit in the history of the Catholic Church, and deepen their awareness of the Church's continual pursuit of truth through faith and reason. Offered every two years in sequence with THEO 200.

Prerequisites: THEO 106 and 200.

THEO 202  H2a:Christology    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the person, being and activity of Jesus of Nazareth in depth through an examination of biblical testimonies, early Church Councils, and contemporary theological methods. Students will reinforce their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics, theological anthropology, and Church teaching. They will also critically address the question of Jesus' contemporary relevance. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 203  H2a:Christian Moral Life    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines traditional notions of conscience, responsibility, authority, freedom and value in light of the Gospel. In addition to reinforcing their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics, theological anthropology, and Church teaching, students will critically discuss contemporary moral issues. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 205  H2a:DV:Church in the Mod Wrld    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the nature, mission, and structures of the Church in the context of contemporary society. Students will deepen their understanding of the practical implications of the Catholic Church's dogmatic and pastoral constitutions, which declare its responsibility to be a "sacrament of salvation" whose ministry transforms individuals and society. By considering specific examples of the Church's efforts to liberate and humanize, students will also gain greater appreciation for Christianity's global diversity and the Catholic Church's commitment to ecumenical unity and interfaith dialogue.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 207  H1:DV:African-Ameri Religion    3 sem. hrs.

The tradition of African thought is at least as old as Plato (spent 13 years in Egypt) and Augustine of Libya. The course will consider this tradition up to and including African-American thought: Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Angela Davis, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. Dobois, M.L. King, Jr. and other.

THEO 212  The Synoptic Gospels    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies Matthew, Mark, and Luke's gospels. Students will acquire competence in distinguishing the common narrative elements of these gospels from each evangelist's unique theological vision. Students will also deepen their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 213  Johannine Writings    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies those New Testament texts which Church tradition ascribes to the authorship of John the son of Zebedee (the Fourth Gospel, the Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation). Students will acquire competence in identifying and critically analyzing the distinctive theological ideas of these writings. They will also deepen their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 215  H2a:Old Testament Scriptures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literature and theology of the Old Testament: the Pentateuch, the Histories, the Poetical/Wisdom books, and the Prophets, including the Deutero-canonical literature unique to the Catholic Bible. Students will learn about modern scholarly theories concerning the formation of these texts. They will also deepen their knowledge of Catholic biblical hermeneutics and of the Church's dogmatic constitution on divine revelation. Offered Fall term.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 216  H2a:New Testament Scriptures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literature and theology of the New Testament: the Gospels and Acts, the Epistles, and the Apocalypse of the formation of these texts. They will also deepen their knowledge of Catholic biblical hermeneutics and of the Church's dogmatic constitution on divine revelation. Offered Spring term.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 271  H2a:Cathol Belief in Practice    3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the theological concepts and spiritual practices that most distinguish Catholics within the diverse expressions of Christianity. Topics may include the Mass, the sacraments, sexual ethics, social ethics, types of prayer, and pilgrimage and forms of popular piety. Students will deepen their knowledge of Church teaching. They will also reflect upon the work of the Holy Spirit in the Church and deepen their awareness of the Church's continual pursuit of truth through faith and reason. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 289  H1:DV:Hate Groups and Violence    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the background, culture, and beliefs of individuals and movements that advocate hate. Students will study the psychological, philosophical, and religious origins of hate. They will also critically apply these interdisciplinary perspectives to anti-semitism, pogroms, the Holocaust, KKK, racism, and neofascism. This course includes a field trip to the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., the costs for which are underwritten by the Ed and Ruth Wilkof Foundation. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 302  H3:Liturgy/Sacraments    3 sem. hrs.

This class studies Christian liturgy and sacraments as signs and instruments of divine grace in the life of the Church. By reflecting on these sources of Christian life, students will develop a summative understanding of Catholic theology. Offered Fall term.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 303  H2a:Theological Themes in Lit    3 sem. hrs.

This course employs literary works from a variety of traditions to identify the theological themes and values they address such as faith, prayer, good vs. evil and moral dilemmas. Students will examine these works to deepen their awareness of the importance of sound theological anthropology, critical thinking and how the Holy Spirit intersects with and challenges the lives of all. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 308-1  H2a:DM:DV:Rel&Multiculturalism    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the intersection of religion and culture both past and present. It provides a unique, hybrid environment that combines a live classroom with online learning and digital media projects. The culminating activity of this course will be an extended, eight-week collaboration with students of Oranim University in Israel. Through this shared "virtual classroom" you will learn from one another and together explore multicultural dimensions of Northeast Ohio and the Galilee.

THEO 309  H2a:SL:Princ of Justice/Peace    3 sem. hrs.

This course considers justice and peace as core principles of the Gospel. By applying Catholic social teaching to the contemporary world, students will develop a summative understanding of theological anthropology and the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 310  H3:Contem Christian Spiritu    3 sem. hrs.

This course considers the demands of authentic Christian discipleship, the different vocations within which it is lived (married or single, lay or consecrated), and the major spiritualities that have emerged in response to those vocations. Students will integrate the biblical, theological, and historical sources of Christian faith in order to develop a spiritual exercise appropriate to their own life. Offered Spring term.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 317  H2a:RometoJer:AClashofCultures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the history, architecture, conflict and development of Roman and Jewish culture and religion during the first centuries BC and AD as a backdrop to the faith of Jesus. In addition to developing competency in critical thinking and dialogue, students will compare the two great civilizations and consider parallels between them and our contemporary culture. Cross-listed with JS 317. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 320  H3:Repair a BrokenWorld    3 sem. hrs.

This course investigates the social justice values of the biblical prophets, the Jewish mystical concept of Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World), and movements such as Zionism and Reform Judaism as responses to the brokenness of the world and as rationales for religiously motivated action. Students will deepen their understanding of theological anthropology. They will also apply these values to today's world and identify their own rationale for repairing the world. Cross-listed with JS 315. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 403  Evangelization and Catechesis    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the history of the Catholic catechesis from the early models of initiation to contemporary RCIA processes. Students will acquire deeper insight into the challenges and opportunities for religious education in the Twenty-First Century. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 406  Theology Internship    1-6 sem. hrs.

The internship experience is mandatory for all Theology majors. The aim of the internship is to integrate theological theory and pastordal practice. It is a custom-designed internship with a wide variety of possible ministry venues. The internship is determined and arranged with the student's advisor. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 408  Seminar: Topics in Theology    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines essential topics in theological studies, for example, the mystery of suffering, the development of doctrine, theological method, and Mariology. The chosen topic varies according to student and faculty interest. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 409  H3:Sem:Selected Theologians    3 sem. hrs.

This course is devoted to exploring the work of a designated theologian from the Judeo-Christian tradition. It is exegetical in nature and investigates primary themes within the theologian's literary oeuvre. The specific theologian is determined according to student and faculty interest. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.