School of Behavioral and Health Sciences

Dr. Pamela Ritzline, Dean
Dr. Penny Bove, Associate Dean

School of Behavioral and Health Science Vision

Through our academic programs, the School of Behavioral and Health Sciences engages faculty and students in research and in efforts to improve the quality of human and community life.  We aspire to promote innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration, global and domestic service and advocacy for the underserved.

School of Behavioral and Health Science Mission

The mission of the School of Behavioral and Health Sciences is to provide high quality innovative educational programs which foster academic excellence rooted in scholarship and evidence based practices.  Academic excellence embodies critical thinking, effective communication, creativity, life-long learning and an orientation to interdisciplinary and global learning.  We challenge students in the academic programs to examine their personal values and respect the uniqueness, human dignity and cultural backgrounds of all people.  Our students become leaders in service who demonstrate ethical and professional behaviors and advocate for the rights, health and welfare of all human beings.  We encourage individuals to act in accordance with and guided by the example and teachings of Jesus Christ.

Programs of Study

The School of Behavioral and Health Sciences offers programs in Counseling and Human Development, a Master of Occupational Therapy and a Doctor of Physical Therapy.

Counseling and Human Development

CHD 602  Research Methods/Prog Eval    3 sem. hrs.

An overview of statistical concepts and methods used in counseling research from single case-study, qualitative designs through complex, multivariate quantitative research designs. Included are consideration of sampling methods, descriptive and inferential statistics with particular reference to hypothesis testing, and the analysis, evaluation and interpretation of statistical data, using computer-based systems. The course includes consideration of the use of research methods in program evaluation, needs assessments and outcome studies. Special focus is given to understanding the importance of integrating research into the professional identity of school and mental health counselors to the benefit of students, clients and the overall profession. This is a foundational course. It must be taken within the first 3 semesters following admission.

CHD 603  Assessment in Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

An overview of basic statistical concepts and methods in psychometrics and the uses of group and individual psychological testing and other assessment methods in counseling (interviews, biopsychosocial evaluation). It provides an overview of the history and current context of psychometric assessment, including ethical and legal perspectives and social and cultural perspectives. The course considers the application of assessment methods to client case conceptualization and themeasurement of client progress and outcomes. It provides an overview of various types of standardized and non-standardized psychological assessment including the use of intelligence, aptitude and ability, achievement, symptom checklists and personality assessment instruments. The course introduces students to test reviewing and counseling assessment report writing. This is a foundational course. It must be taken within the first 3 semesters following admission.

CHD 605  Found/Dimens of School Counsel    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to prepare school counseling students to become effective leaders in the process of transforming school counseling to meet the American School Counseling Association's (ASCA) National Standards. The historical, philosophical and current trends in school counseling are addressed as well as professional and ethical issues facing school counselors including school counselors' scope of practice. The development, implementation and evaluation of a comprehensive school counseling program are also introduced. This is a beginning level course.

CHD 610  Prin/Tech/Theories of Coun/Dev    3 sem. hrs.

Study of selected theories of counseling and psychotherapy including the application of specific techniques to human problems and to the promotion of optimal mental health. The role of the counselor in initiating and supporting the change process in an ethically and legally sound manner. The application of counseling theories in case conceptualization, intervention selection, and consultation. Foundational understanding of theories to allow the development of a personal philosophy for counseling and consultation to be used in applied settings.This is a beginning level course.

CHD 612  Lifepsan Development    3 sem. hrs.

Overview of human development processes and stages. Analysis of predictable conflicts and crises associated with progression throughout lifespan, as well as the impact of cultural and environmental factors upon development. Overview of developmental theories (physical, psychosexual, cognitive, emotional, and social development) that describe development from conception to death. Concentration upon applying theoretical concepts to counseling various populations acrosslifespan. This is a beginning level course.

CHD 620  Found/Organ of School Counsel    3 sem. hrs.

This course serves as an orientation to the school counseling profession. The course covers history, philosophy, and trends in school counseling; roles, responsibilities, knowledge of the school setting and curriculum; legal and ethical issues; policies, laws, and legislation, and implications of sociocultural, demographic, and lifestyle diversity; and organization and administration of the educational system. Students will learn how to organize, administer, and evaluate a comprehensive, developmental school counseling program based on current models of school counseling programs and the individual, school, and communityneeds. They will learn about national standards, certification and licensurerequirements

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612.

CHD 624  Career Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

Various aspects of career, including planning, exploration, and involvement, are integral elements of human development. One of the philosophical foundations of the counseling profession is to promote the wellness and full development of individuals. Thus, the focus of this course is to introduce students to foundational career development and counseling theories, as well as the current state of career development assessment, research, and practice in order to prepare them towork with individuals' developmental concerns which relate to careerdevelopment.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 603*.

CHD 626  Group Process    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to introduce students to the group as a unique medium of implementing the counseling process. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis of group dynamics as it relates to counseling, growth, and development. Employing various theoretical perspectives, students will be exposed to the possibilities of group counseling in a variety of settings with different populations. Learning is facilitated through an experiential model and an interpersonal lab is required.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 610, (B.A./M.A. program BSC 560).

CHD 628  Post-Secondary Stud Developmen    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on post-secondary student development with a special focus on career development, career planning and exploration, as well as principles and models of assessment for post-secondary student programming. The course addresses key topics in the learning and developmental needs of post-secondary students, a differential approach to student development theories, and the application of student characteristics to student affairs programming that promotesoptimal development and wellness across the lifespan. Special attention will be given to practices that promote student career development, and the application of assessment theories and methods of program evaluation and environmental assessment to the evaluation of student affairs programming.

Corequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 610.

CHD 633  Marriage/Family Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

An overview of theories and treatment strategies in marriage and family therapy. Course provides an introduction to the field of family therapy and to the application of systems theory to the understanding and treatment of human problems. Also considers family development and cultural and gender issues in the practice of family counseling. Students may take this concurrent with practicum. This is an intermediate level course.

Prerequisite: CHD 610 or 612.

CHD 635  Addictions    3 sem. hrs.

Course presents the biopsychosocial approach to the etiology, assessment,diagnosis and treatment of substance use disorders and addictive behaviors. Includes application of counseling theories and techniques in chemical dependency counseling as well as an overview of treatment stages and environments. Examines the impact of addiction on the family and the role of self-help groups in the recovery process. This is an intermediate level course.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, and CHD 610 or CHD 612.

CHD 637  Consult,Collabor & Leadership    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the major consultation and leadership theories and techniques and to help students develop consultation, collaboration, and leadership skills which may be applied in higher education, K-12, community agencies, or other settings. The School Counseling and SAHE students will explore consultant and leadership characteristics, sociocultural factors, and legal and ethical considerations as it applies to their respective specialties. Students will also learn about the qualities, principles, skills, and stylesof effective leaders and consultants. Next offering TBA. Prerequisites for SAHE: BSC 560, CHD 602, 610, 624, 640, CHD 626 (can be taken at the same time).

CHD 640  Found,Func & Prof Issues SAHE    3 sem. hrs.

This course serves as an orientation to the Student Affairs in Higher Education profession with a special focus on organizational structure and functional areas as well as the characteristics, needs, and culture of the college student and collegiate environments. Emphasis will be placed on career exploration and career planning options in the field. This course also explores practices and contemporary issues that impact the experience of college students with diverse and pluralistic academic communities. The course addresses history, philosophy, and selected trends facing higher education at large and the Student Affairs profession in particular including: roles, responsibilities, and knowledge of higher learning as complex systems. It considers administration, management, and leadership in higher education, including an introduction to budget management and assessment of student affairs practice and programming.

Corequisites: BSC 560 or CHD 602 or CHD 610.

CHD 662  Individ Study: Counsel/Dev    1-3 sem. hrs.

Individually tailored library research, laboratory research, or field research undertaken by the student under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member(s). Intended for the student whose research interests are so specialized as to warrant a separate course specifically oriented around those interests. Offered every semester.

CHD 663  Law,Ethics, Dec Making in SAHE    3 sem. hrs.

This course will examine selected legal issues facing contemporary colleges and universities. The course covers the law of higher education along with landmark court cases that inform the educational and professional practices of SAHE leaders within public and private institutions. Special attention will be given to competing notions of law and ethics, exploring the balance between rights and responsibilities of all members of the academic community (e.g., faculty, staff, and students). The course addresses legal and ethical issues such as: the relationship between law and policy, affirmative action, First Amendment issues, student conduct and due process, etc. The course also explores foundational documents and professional standards that articulate the values of the Student Affairs profession and provide guidance for the decision-making process of educators and administrators as they work with diverse student populations and other constituents. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach to law and ethics that helps future Student Affairs professionals to think critically about what informs their decisions.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602 or 610, 628 or 640.

CHD 664L  IS:Profess Counselor Identity    1 sem. hr.

CHD 665  CMHC:Foundations for Practice    3 sem. hrs.

Orientation to the professional specialty of clinical mental health counseling, including professional roles, identity and functions, the history and philosophy of the profession, scope of practice, ethical and professional practice issues (such as managed care), credentialing, and clinical supervision, models and processes. Exploration of the models and programs used in the prevention and treatment of mental health across diverse populations, and the design of mental health servicedelivery systems across levels of care. Investigation of the organization(including emergency management systems), financing, public policy and regulatory processes of mental health service delivery systems. Consideration of advocacy for mental health service needs across diverse populations and for the advancement of the profession Recommended: CHD 635.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 626, 635, 740.

CHD 670  Multicultural/Diversity Educ    3 sem. hrs.

This course prepares students to advocate for, and develop, empowering educational and learning environments for all post-secondary student populations. As the second course in the diversity sequence, the course is specifically geared to multicultural issues (e.g. discrimination, power, privilege, oppression, values) as they relate to post-secondary student development and educational environments. The course will address diversity programming, recruitment, retention, and graduation promotion of traditionally under-represented students. Students willexplore the impact of their own attitudes, beliefs, world view, and racial and cultural identity as developing student affair professionals.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 610, 628, 624, 640, 730, 626.

CHD 680  Issues in School Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to provide an overview of current issues in school counseling such as achievement gap, academic success, preventing school dropout, at risk youth, exceptional abilities, homelessness, etc. This course emphasizes developmentally appropriate prevention, intervention, and responsive counseling services for working with the diverse populations within the school setting. Included topics: program planning, implementation and evaluation; use of date and accountability; advocacy and ethical and legal practices in the contextof the school environment.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 620, 624, 626, 637 and 740.

CHD 710-1  Counseling Adolescents    3 sem. hrs.

The course covers clinical management of common problems with adolescents. Issues such as academic achievement, mood and anxiety, oppositional and defiant behavior, sexuality, substance use and abuse, self-harm and suicide are explored from a developmental perspective. Assessment, service planning and building a community-based system of care will be described based on current research literature. Lecture, video, and small group work will be used as part of instruction. Creative interventions, including symbolic and art techniques, will also be explored.

CHD 710-2  Counseling Children    3 sem. hrs.

The course covers clinical management of common problems with children. The importance of family and parent training is emphasized, as well as the critical need to intervene with children using play as the language of the child. Issues such as academic achievement, mood and anxiety, behavioral management, self-harm and suicides are explored from a developmental perspective. Assessment, service planning and building a community-based system of care will be described based on current research literature. Lecture, video, and small group work will beused as part of instruction.

CHD 710-4  Spirituality in Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to help mental health and school counseling students integrate spirituality into their professional counseling practice. The course is presented in a seminar format to encourage individual exploration of this topic. The approach to the topic of spirituality is from a multicultural perspective, understanding spirituality/religion as a cultural aspect of all people. The didactic and experiential learning experiences are designed to encourage awareness, knowledge and skills related to spirituality. Course content will focus on the following topics in addition to those selected by students: distinction between religion and spirituality; world religions & worldviews; ethical issues and spirituality;assessment and spirituality; and faith development models.

CHD 710-6  Cross Cult Coun Interve-Uganda    3 sem. hrs.

Through an international experience in Uganda, students in this course will develop components of knowledge, skills, and awareness as related to cross-cultural counseling. Didactic learning (lecture, readings, video, and class discussion) will facilitate students’ understanding of the social and political history of Uganda, including the impact of the civil war on cultural traditions and the mental and emotional health of the population. Students will learn about prevalent mental and emotional disorders and the interface between culture and psychopathology and will learn about various treatment approaches, both Western and Traditional,for mental health problems. Students will research counseling in cross-cultural settings in preparation for facilitating skill-building groups with and among Ugandan facilitators and participants. Additionally, students will be asked to synthesize and apply what they have learned through this experience to develop an appropriate intervention to be implemented in either a community or school in response to a specific disorder and/or concern. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Ugandaprogram

CHD 710-7  Counseling in Military Culture    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the understanding of military culture as it relates to the assessment and treatment of mental health disorders. Issues such as PTSD, combat stressors and readjustment from military to civilian environments are often challenges for most Veterans. This course will assist in identifying strategies for screening and assessing military clients and developing effective treatment plans.

CHD 710-8  Conflict Resolution    3 sem. hrs.

In this course, students will explore and discuss conflict resolution styles and strategies. The course will focus on the impact of cultural differences in responding to and managing conflict, as well as the effect personal temperament and power in relationships have on managing conflict. Students will have the opportunity to apply conflict management skills to deal with conflict in a more productive manner.

Prerequisite: Enrollment in Uganda program.

CHD 710-9  Counseling Families    3 sem. hrs.

Explores the application of systems perspective and family-based theories to the assessment and counseling interventions for relational mental and behavioral problems. Considers the processes of working with families in counseling. Incorporates best practices literature regarding the use of family-based counseling approaches across the continuum of care. Involves demonstrations and opportunities to practice counseling techniques and skills from at least one family-based theoretical approach to specific presenting problems. Investigates the impact of culture and socioeconomic status on family dynamics, the counselingprocess and specific counseling interventions. Explores the unique ethical and professional issues in family counseling.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 624, 635, 740 772.

CHD 71010  Group Counsel in Clin Practice    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to continue educating and instructing counseling students to the group process at an advanced level and to assist them in implementing the counseling process in the clinical/community setting. Emphasis continues to be placed upon the analysis of group dynamics as it relates to counseling, growth, and development. Employing various theoretical perspectives, students will be exposed to the possibilities of group counseling in a variety of settings with different populations. Emphasis will be placed on learning, practicing and implementing Evidenced-Based Practices and exploring community mental health and private clinical practices. Learning is facilitated through an experiental model and an interpersonal lab is required.

Prerequisites: CHD 626.

CHD 71011  Higher Edu in Globalized World    3 sem. hrs.

This course orients aspriring Student Affairs professionals to contemporary trends and issues that inform and impact colleges and universities both in the United States and abroad. It takes a multidisciplinary approach to the study of globalization in higher education. The course focuses on how politics, economics, education, and other fields, drive both the need for and desirability of "internationalizing" the college experience. It explores important questions in relation to the challenges and opportunities for higher education as it seeks to expand its "boarders" while preparing students for citizenship, work, and life in the context of a global world.

CHD 71012  Cons Old Adults & Families    3 sem. hrs.

This course will provide an understanding of the foundation, assumptions, goals, and "principles" of narrative therapy. Conceptualzation of client presenting concerns will be based on a narrative therapy prospective. Review of narrative therapy methods will include work with children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families.

CHD 71013  Narrative Counseling Methods    3 sem. hrs.

This course will provide an understanding of the foundation, assumptions, goals, and “principles” of narrative therapy. Conceptualization of client presenting concerns will be based on a narrative therapy perspective. Review of narrative therapy methods will include work with children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families.

CHD 71014  Art Ther & Neuro Basd Trauma T    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses of the effectiveness of Art Therapy in the treatment of Neurobiologically Informed Trauma Therapy. The body-based effects of trauma are stored in the right hemisphere of the brain. Therefore, Art Therapy and other experiential therapies are some of the most effective approaches to access the right brain hemisphere and foster healing and growth. The basic principles of Art Therapy will be reviewed through "hands on" experiential art procedures emphasizing trauma recovery.

CHD 730  Soc/Cult Diversity in Coun    3 sem. hrs.

Exploration of social and cultural diversity in counseling, including diverse racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural heritages and sexual identities and socioeconomic statuses. Study of historical and current issues of equality as applied to socially marginalized groups. Personal reflection on the impact of one's own attitudes, beliefs, world view, and racial and cultural identity on the counseling process. Strategies for employing culturally competent counseling in individual, group, andfamily modalities, including specific behavioral skills and application of various theories of racial and cultural identity development. The role of the counselor as an advocate for members of marginalized groups and for the pursuit of social justice. Ethical and legal obligations of counselors in dealing with social and cultural diversity.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 610, 612.

CHD 740  Ethics/Issues in Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

Examination of historical factors that have contributed to the development of the counseling profession and the present-day organization of professional counseling. Overview of professional organizations, licensure and credentialing, and advocacy issues. Application of ethical codes to mental health and school counseling issues. Standards for professional practice and issues related to delivery of counseling services are emphasized in this course. Recommended: CHD 612.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602,610.

CHD 749  Crisis Intervention    3 sem. hrs.

Course provides an overview of the clinical management of crisis. Topics addressed include sexual abuse and assault, vulnerable population abuse and neglect, self-harm and suicide, violence and homicide, and human-made and natural disasters. Basic crisis and trauma theories and related research are presented. Students gain knowledge on risk assessment, safety planning, brief counseling, and consultation with community entities. Personal values, beliefs, and biases about various crises are explored. The counselor’s ethical responsibility to act as an advocate for populations affected by crises is emphasized.

CHD 751  Grief and Loss Couseling    3 sem. hrs.

Grief is an inevitable, normal, and universal experience. It is a process that is unique for each person and his/her specific experience of loss. For some people, loss presents challenges which can be helped with counseling. This course serves as an introduction to the process of grief counseling, based on literature supporting effective theories and interventions. The structure of the course reflects a preparation of counselors that includes three components: development of awareness of personal experience and beliefs on grief, increase of knowledge of grief terminology and theories, and promotion of skills to use when working with clients managing grief and loss. The assignments for this course have been developed to help students as they begin working with clients in practicum, internship, and post-licensure.

CHD 752  Trauma Assessment/Treatment    3 sem. hrs.

This is an elective course focused on trauma assessment and treatment to respond to the current issues in the mental health counseling field. The philosophical underpinning of counseling is to promote wellness and full development of individuals. This class in turn is focused on introducing students to trauma and history, understanding how trauma impacts human functioning as well as various forms of trauma, current treatment and counseling theories, assessment, research, relationship between trauma and culture, and practice in order to prepare them to work with individuals whose concerns relate to trauma all while teaching students to promote client wellness.

CHD 753  Relational Cultural Therapy    3 sem. hrs.

This interactive format course will explore application of the Stone Center Relational Cultural Model in counseling. Students will engage and discuss primary source materials and their application to case conceptualization, counseling interventions and the client-counselor relationship across a wide variety of client scenarios from prevention through treatment contexts. Students will explore application of the model in experiential activities as well as in didactic activities

CHD 754  Psychopharmacology    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for the non-medical therapist who is interested in learning more about how psychoactive medications work within the human body. Major groups of drugs covered include those typically prescribed in psychiatric medicine, commonly abused drugs including "street drugs," "over the counter drugs," and others (coffee, nicotine, alcohol, etc.). The foci of the course are mechanisms of action, behavioral effects, and side effects of psychotropic drugs.

CHD 755  Supervision and Consultation    3 sem. hrs.

This course provides students with the opportunity to explore supervision theories, develop supervision skills, and explore ethical issues of supervision. The course will utilize both didactic and experiential instructional methods and provide major resources of the supervision field to assist students in becoming supervisors. Ethical and administrative issues in supervision will also be addressed.

CHD 756  Art Therapy    3 sem. hrs.

This course covers the history and philosophy of Art Therapy and its relationship to other therapies. The power, strength and practicality of the therapeutic use of art will be discovered through experiential ("hands-on") art experiences. The ability to apply the basic principles will be gained through this course.

CHD 757  Couples Therapy    3 sem. hrs.

This course has been designed to teach skills in identifying and tracking patterns of interaction in a dyad. Students will become familiar with effective interventions for changing couple interaction. Current literature in couples therapy will be reviewed, including theory, research and techniques. Students will learn to identify links between learning in the family of origin and functioning in current relationships.

CHD 758  Child/Adol Treat Approaches    3 sem. hrs.

The course covers clinical management of common problems with children and adolescents. Issues such as suicide, sex offending, child abuse and neglect, oppositional/conduct disorders, developmental tasks, as well as legal/ethical issues, will be covered. Assessment, service planning and building a community-based system of care will be described based on current research literature. Lecture, journal articles, videotape and role-play are all used as part of instruction. Next offering TBA.

CHD 759  Gestalt Meth Intervention    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for clinicians who want to learn the uses of Gestalt methods in their counseling practice. Conceptual issues are covered, but the main focus of the course will be the design and application of interventions based on Gestalt therapy and therapeutic methodology. Students are expected to apply information from this course to themselves or to suitable clients from their caseload. Next offering TBA.

CHD 760  School Counseling/21st Century    3 sem. hrs.

Topics and trends in response to current social changes, socioeconomic pressures, and world events which influence the changing direction of school counseling programs will be addressed. This course is designed as a useful source of information for students pursuing school counseling licensure as well as a resource for professional school counselors in the process of self-renewal.

CHD 761  Play Therapy    3 sem. hrs.

This course provides students with the basic assumptions underlying play therapy as a therapeutic intervention, symbolic meaning of toys, and therapeutic value of their use; child intake skills with an emphasis on play sessions, stages of play therapy, and issues for each stage, construction and use of a therapeutic metaphor with children in a play context. Ethical issues in play therapy with children are also addressed. Next offering TBA.

CHD 762  Eating Disorders    3 sem. hrs.

This course will prepare clinicians to recognize, diagnose, and treat eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and related disorders. Societal, biological, familial, trauma, and psychological factors contributing to eating disorders will be examined. Societal pressure for thinness that contributes to eating disorders will be discussed.

CHD 763  Wellness    3 sem. hrs.

This course presents a wellness, strengths-based, holistic paradigm to conceptualizing human functioning and treatment interventions. Wellness models are presented as a method for case conceptualization and treatment planning, along with clinically relevant assessments and techniques. Students will examine their own functioning across various domains of wellness and apply techniques for optimizing personal functioning. Next offering TBA.

CHD 764  Motivational Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

Provides an introduction to the basic principles and interventions of motivational interviewing and stages of change theory; and explores counseling applications with substance abusers, difficult-to-treat and delinquent teens, criminal justice clients, and dual diagnosis clients. Incorporates experiential practice of techniques.

CHD 766  Organ & Admin of School Couns    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to prepare for the organization, implementation, coordination, and administration of counseling, testing, consulting, and guidance services provided in single and/or multiple school assignments by school counselors. Legal and ethical issues related to school counselor decisions and guidance functions will be studied. This is an advanced level course.

Prerequisite: CHD 605.

CHD 767  Art Therapy II    3 sem. hrs.

Art Therapy II continues the exploration of "the doing and processing" of art in a therapeutic counseling context. The class will review the basic principles and ethics of the profession. "Hands-on" art experiences will lead to a deeper understanding of visual metaphors in combination with methods to access core beliefs.

Prerequisite: CHD 756.

CHD 768  Cognitive Behavior Intervent    3 sem. hrs.

This three (3) semester hour course provides students with the basic assumptions of cognitive behavioral therapy and its therapeutic interventions. Students will have an opportunity to move through the various stages of treatment from intake to termination and explore various problems that are benefited by cognitive behavioral techniques. Role playing, applying theory to the development of technique and text and additional readings will afford students an opportunity to integrate cognitive behavioral techniques into their counseling and therapy. Thehistorical roots of the therapy will be explored to provide a contextual understanding of the mode of therapy.

CHD 772  Advanced Abnormal Behavior    3 sem. hrs.

Survey of all forms of abnormal behavior within each group of psychiatric disorders, viewed from various etiological perspectives, including neurobiological, psychodynamic, humanistic/existential, family systems, and cognitive-behavioral. Review of current research regarding etiology and treatment across all forms of abnormal behavior. Delineation of symptoms, etiology, developmental course of the disorders, commonly accepted treatment modalities and prognosis across culturally diverse populations. Review of psychotropic medications, includingtheir drug actions, common side effects and their use in the treatment of specific psychiatric disorders. Consideration of the prevention of abnormal behavior and issues related specifically to abnormal behavior among racial, ethnic, and socially diverse groups.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 635 (CHD 635 may be taken concurrently).

CHD 775  Diag Mental/Emot Disorders    3 sem. hrs.

An overview of the historical and ethical issues, conceptual principles, and current research regarding diagnostic systems used in classifying mental and emotional disorders with special reference to the DSM system. Focus on practice in making differential diagnostic formulations, recognizing signs and symptoms related to diagnostic systems (including the use of the Mental Status Exam), using current DSM and ICD nomenclature, provisional diagnoses and rule outs. Practice inarticulating the relationship of biopsychosocial case conceptualization to diagnostic processes. Practice in evaluating the impact of medical and substance use on diagnosis. Consideration of the racial, ethnic and cultural heritage, and social diversity on diagnostic processes, and the appropriate use of diagnostic processes during crisis and disaster events.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 624, 626, 635, 665, 730, 740, and 772.

CHD 777  Treat Mental/Emot Disorders    3 sem. hrs.

Exploration of the delivery of mental health services through empirically-supported treatments, and integrative, theory-related, individualized case conceptualization and comprehensive treatment planning for individuals from diverse social groups. Practice in the use of commonly accepted biopsychosocial case conceptualizations, treatment planning and case documentation systems with specific case materials.Consideration of lethality and crisis assessment and intervention strategies based on developmental stage and context, strengths and vulnerabilities. Review of strategies for the delivery of crisis, brief and outpatient/long-term mental health services across the continuum of care, including consideration of the use of family and social networks. Consideration of appropriate service delivery and interventions for disaster, crisis and trauma-causing events among socially diverse populations.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 624, 626, 635, 665, 730, 740, 772 & 775.

CHD 780  Personality Assessment    3 sem. hrs.

In-depth consideration of the integrated use of standardized psychometric assessment instruments (including their limitations), biopsychosocial evaluation (diagnostic interviewing), and the use of the Mental Status Examination in the clinical evaluation and treatment of individuals. Focus on the importance of considering personality style, and social and cultural diversity in clinical assessment, case conceptualization and treatment planning processes. Practice in the use of various assessment batteries, their administration, scoring and interpretation, and the application of assessment results to the clinical evaluation of individuals, and the development of comprehensive counseling assessment reports, case conceptualizations, and treatment plans.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 624, 626, 635, 665, 730, 740, 772, 775 & 777.

CHD 790  Practicum: Counseling Tech    3 sem. hrs.

Intensive counseling experiences with individual and group supervision. Emphasis is on developing the therapeutic relationship, counseling procedures, ethical practice and the application of counseling theories to various client concerns. Course focuses on assisting counselor trainees to improve individual and group counseling skills.According to CACREP 2009 Standards, Section III.G.1-4, Mental Health Counseling Practicum involves 100 hours of mental health counseling services including: individual and group counseling (at least 40 face-to-face hours); testing; consultation; referral and case management; assessment, diagnosis and treatment planning; taped case review; termination procedures; and individual and group supervision. The face-to-face counseling hours are generated through the Walsh Herttna Counseling Center (HCC) in conjunction with specified off-site programs. Please note that at least 8-10 group counseling hours are required and count toward the required cumulative total of 40 face-to-face hours. Also, according to CACREP 2009 Standards, Section III.G.1-4, School Counseling Practicum involves 100 hours of school counseling activities including: individual and group counseling (at least 40 face-to-face hours); guidance activities; consultation; referral and case management; psycho-social assessment; taped case review; termination procedures; and, individual and group supervision. The face-to-face hours are generated through the HCC in conjunction with specified off-site school settings. Therefore, in order to meet both mental health and school CACREP standards for clinical instruction and licensure requirements for each specialty, Dual Counseling Practicum requires: 1) a total of 60 hours face-to-face individual and group counseling; with the 60 hour total, a minimum of 20 face-to-face hours of direct service to K-12 age children and/or adolescents must be provided in an approved off-site school setting. A minimum total of 120 cumulative Practicum hours are thus required. More specific production requirements are specified below.In addition, students must complete observation hours at the off-site location, have a mid-term evaluation with an overall score of 3.0 out of a 5 point scale, and have HCC site supervisor approval prior to being released for direct hours with clients.Mental Health prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 624, 626,665, 730, 740, 772, 775, 777.School Counseling prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 603, 610, 612, 620,624, 626, 635, 637, 730 and 740.

CHD 793I  Internship in SAHE I    3 sem. hrs.

These two courses provide 600 hours of supervised internship in Student Affairs in Higher Education. These are performance-based courses in which students participate in at least two distinct practice experiences in developmental work with individual student and groups of students in: program planning, implementation, or evaluation; staff training, advising, developmental counseling or career development, or supervision; and administration functions (including program development and evaluation) in SAHE settings. Internship field experiences are served in approved college and university settings under the supervision of professional student affairs site supervisors and CHD faculty members. Students apply academic and counseling skills in the development of a capstone project which demonstrates their competence as SAHE professionals as part of their internship experiences.

Prerequisites: BSC 560, CHD 602, 610, 640, 624, 626, 628, 730, 626, 663.

CHD 793II  Internship in SAHE II(CapProj)    3 sem. hrs.

These two courses provide 600 hours of supervised internship in Student Affairs in Higher Education. These are performance-based courses in which students participate in at least two distinct practice experiences in developmental work with individual student and groups of students in: program planning, implementation, or evaluation; staff training, advising, developmental counseling or career development, or supervision; and administration functions (including program development and evaluation) in SAHE settings. Internship field experiences are served in approved college and university settings under the supervision of professional student affairs site supervisors and CHD faculty members. Students apply academic and counseling skills in the development of a capstone project which demonstrates their competence as SAHE professionals as part of their internship experiences.

Prerequisites: BSC 560; CHD 602; 610, 640, 624, 628, 730, 626, 637.

CHD 795  Internship: School Counseling    3 sem. hrs.

Internship in School Counseling serves as the capstone experience for the school counselor-in-training. The basic purpose of the internship is to provide each intern with a field experience and the opportunity to integrate the application of counseling theories and skills to counseling practice with individuals, groups, families, children, and/or adolescents in a school setting. Evaluation of skills is made through close supervision by the on-site supervising school counselor and the instructor.

Prerequisites: Practicum and its prerequisites.

CHD 795I  Internship Sch Counsel I    3 sem. hrs.

Internship in School Counseling serves as the culminating experience for the school counselor-in-training. The basic purpose of the internship is to provide each intern with a field experience and the opportunity to integrate the application of counseling theories and skills to counseling practice with individuals, groups, families, children, and/or adolescents in a school setting. Evaluation of skills is made through close supervision by the supervising school counselor and the instructor.

Prerequisite: Practicum.

CHD 795II  Internship Sch Counsel II    3 sem. hrs.

Internship in School Counseling serves as the culminating experience for the school counselor-in-training. The basic purpose of the internship is to provide each intern with a field experience and the opportunity to integrate the application of counseling theories and skills to counseling practice with individuals, groups, families, children, and/or adolescents in a school setting. Evaluation of skills is made through close supervision by the supervising school counselor and the instructor.

Prerequisite: Practicum.

CHD 796  Internship: Mental Health Coun    3 sem. hrs.

Designed as capstone of clinical training, these are performance-based courses in which students must demonstrate their competence in diagnosis and treatment planning in an approved clinical setting (clinic, private practice, hospital, etc.). Emphasis is on the application of academic training and skills with clients. Evaluation of demonstrated skills is made through close supervision by an on-site supervisor and the instructor.

Prerequisites: CHD 790 and its prerequisites.

CHD 796I  Internship in MH Counsel I    3 sem. hrs.

Designed as the capstone of clinical training, these are performance-based courses in which students must demonstrate their competence in diagnosis and treatment planning in an approved clinical setting (clinic, private practice, hospital, etc.). Emphasis is on the application of academic training and skills with clients. Evaluation of demonstrated skills is made through close supervision by an on-sitesupervisor and the instructor. Prerequisites: CHD 790 and itsprerequisites

CHD 796II  Internship in MH Counsel II    3 sem. hrs.

Designed as the capstone of clinical training, these are performance-based courses in which students must demonstrate their competence in diagnosis and treatment planning in an approved clinical setting (clinic, private practice, hospital, etc.). Emphasis is on the application of academic training and skills with clients. Evaluation of demonstrated skills is made through close supervision by an on-sitesupervisor and the instructor.

Prerequisites: CHD 796 I and its prerequisites.

Occupational Therapy

OT 502  Foundations of OT    3 sem. hrs.

This course describes the historical and philosophical basis of the profession of occupational therapy. Students are introduced to frames-of-reference, models, and theories, including their development and use in clinical practice. Health care delivery models are explored in both traditional and emerging practice settings. The concepts of professional behaviors, therapeutic use of self, roles and responsibilities of an occupational therapist are introduced. Standards of Practice and Code of Ethics are explored and discussed in relation to healthcare.

OT 503  Human Anatomy    6 sem. hrs.

Human Anatomy is a foundational course in normal human anatomy, both gross anatomy and surface anatomy, using a regional approach. Classroom and laboratory experiences are designed to promote methods of learning that minimize memorization. Incorporation of basic biomechanical principles enhances learning by association. Emphasis is given to the neuromusculoskeletal system and is presented as consistent with occupational and physical therapy clinical practice. (Taken from: Walsh graduate catalog: PT 503/603 Human Anatomy 6 sem. hrs.)

OT 503L  Human Anatomy Lab    0 sem. hrs.

OT 504  Conditions in OT    3 sem. hrs.

Students will identify common medical, developmental, and psychological conditions across the lifespan that are encountered in occupational therapy practice. Content will include definition and description, etiology, incidence and prevalence, signs and symptoms, diagnosis, course and prognosis, medical/surgical management and impact on occupational performance.

OT 506  Task Analysis    1 sem. hr.

An overview of The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework (3rd ed.) will be presented. Students will develop skills of activity analysis including grading and adapting activities and implementing compensatory strategies for increasing activity performance and participation.

OT 602  OT Evaluation & Assess Skls    3 sem. hrs.

Students learn the components of an occupational profile to analyze occupational performance and its relationship to intervention and the development of outcomes. Methods of evaluation including standardized and non-standardized assessments are introduced and their relevance to practice is explored. Skills in effective documentation are developed.

OT 602L  OT Evaluation & Assess Skl Lab    0 sem. hrs.

OT 604  Psych Aspects of Occup Perf    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the theory and practice of psychosocial occupational therapy evaluation and intervention in various settings. Students develop an understanding of the relationship between mental health and wellness as they relate to healthy lifestyles. Theories, models, and frames of reference specific to psychosocial and cognitive dysfunction are examined and clinical reasoning skills are developed to guide decision making throughout the evaluation and intervention process.

OT 604L  Psych Aspects Occup Perf Lab    0 sem. hrs.

OT 606  Therapeutic Interv in Ped    3 sem. hrs.

This course covers the occupations of infants, children, and adolescents including the importance of play in the development of life skills and the use of play as a therapeutic intervention. Common pediatric diagnoses are studied as well as their impact on occupational functioning. Theories, frames-of-reference, and service delivery models, including early intervention and school-based practice, are explored in-depth. Intervention techniques specific to the pediatric population are presented and analyzed.

OT 606L  Therapeutic Interv in Ped Lab    0 sem. hrs.

OT 608  Biomechanics in Occup Therapy    3 sem. hrs.

Students utilize the basic principles of biomechanics to analyze human movement and relate it to occupational performance. Students will practice safe, proper handling of patients during functional mobility and transfers. Principles of biomechanics are applied to the design and fabrication of orthotics and training in prosthetics. Models of practice for the assessment and intervention of movement disorders are applied.

OT 608L  Biomech in Occup Therapy Lab    0 sem. hrs.

OT 610  Neuroscience for Occup Therapy    3 sem. hrs.

This course covers the autonomic, central and peripheral nervous systems with a focus on critical components of the central nervous system and their relationship to common conditions seen in occupational therapy.

OT 612  Lvl 1 Fieldwork A/Seminar    2 sem. hrs.

This is the first of three level I fieldwork experiences. Students will rotate through a variety of selected sites on a weekly basis. This first fieldwork I will incorporate at least 45 hours of contact time in the field with a weekly 1 hour seminar.

OT 614  Ther Interventions in A & G    4 sem. hrs.

Occupational behavior and participation in various roles throughout the continuum of adulthood and older adulthood are explored. Theories, frames of reference, and service delivery models are explored in depth. Intervention techniques specific to this population are identified including prevention, health, and wellness. Barriers to participation are examined as well as opportunities to increase quality of life and enhance community mobility.

OT 616  Enviro & Tech Interventions    2 sem. hrs.

Students will evaluate the importance of context as it relates to occupational performance. The inter-connectedness of environment and other contexts to client factors and performance patterns is explored. Students will identify the need for assistive technology and its application to evaluation and treatment. The principles of universal design, accessible design, and ergonomics will be integrated.

OT 618  Therapeutic Groups    2 sem. hrs.

Group dynamics and therapeutic group interventions are examined including theory, design, implementation and evaluation. Effective therapeutic use of self is explored. Students will develop, lead, and participate in therapeutic groups based on a variety of frames of reference.

OT 620  Evidence-based Practice I    2 sem. hrs.

Students will explore the concepts of evidence-based practice as it relates to the profession today. Students will learn to generate relevant clinical questions and critique current literature for signs of validity or trustworthiness. Using their knowledge of quantitative and qualitative analysis methods, students will determine the quality and applicability of the literature to their questions and professional practice. Scholarly writing skills using the APA style of writing will be required.

OT 622  Lvl I Fieldwork B/Seminar    2 sem. hrs.

This is the second of three level I fieldwork experiences. Students will rotate through a variety of selected sites on a weekly basis. This second fieldwork I will incorporate at least 45 hours of contact time in the field with a weekly 1 hour seminar.

OT 624  Evidence-based Practice II    2 sem. hrs.

This course will build on knowledge developed in the evidence-based practice I course. Students will learn how to conduct scholarly Internet searches and write the sections of a research manuscript and systematic evidence review (SER), and develop an SER on their topical research question over the course of the semester with the end goal of publishing or formally presenting their work. Scholarly writing skills using the APA style of writing will be required.

OT 626  OT Mgmt and Leadership    2 sem. hrs.

Managerial and leadership roles are discussed on a broad scale in the context of an evolving healthcare system. Billing and coding procedures are introduced. Patient advocacy and ethical dilemmas are discussed as related to course topics.

OT 628  Neuro-Cognitive Rehab    2 sem. hrs.

Students will explore neurological impairments, evaluate their effect on function, and determine interventions to improve occupational performance.

OT 630  Advanced Clinical Reasoning    3 sem. hrs.

Students will apply knowledge obtained in previous coursework to complex clinical cases to synthesize components of the OT process. Client education and basic strategies to motivate and teach clients will be integrated. Communication skills with clients, caregivers, and other professionals will be emphasized. Interprofessional practice components will be applied to case scenarios and case studies.

OT 632  Lvl I Fieldwork C/Seminar    2 sem. hrs.

This is the third of three level I fieldwork experiences. Students will rotate through a variety of selected sites on a weekly basis. This third fieldwork I will incorporate at least 45 hours of contact time in the field with a weekly 1 hour seminar.

OT 634  Prof Iss, Eths & Trnds In OT I    2 sem. hrs.

Continuing competence and reflection for professional development and growth are addressed in this course. The continuum of care and the importance of interdisciplinary and interagency communication are emphasized.

OT 636  Prof Iss,Eths & Tre in OT II    2 sem. hrs.

This course builds upon topics discussed in Professional Issues, Ethics, and Trends in Occupational Therapy I. Topics will include obtaining and maintaining licensure and certification, leadership opportunities in professional organizations/community, and clinical specialization. Current professional, political, and societal trends impacting the profession will guide course content. Students will develop a professional portfolio. MOT exit summary and practice certification exam will be completed.

OT 640  Fund of Hand Therapy Elective    1 sem. hr.

Students will be introduced to hand therapy, a specialized area of occupational therapy. Students will explore methods of incorporating client-centeredness and occupation into this type of practice setting while adhering to physician and diagnosis imposed protocols. An understanding of the requirements to obtain and maintain certification will be gained.

OT 642  Sign Lang for OT Pract-Electiv    1 sem. hr.

Students will learn the basics of sign-language as it relates to the practice of occupational therapy.

OT 644  OT in Work & Industry-Elective    1 sem. hr.

Students will explore work as an occupation. The principles of return to work and work retention will be studied in depth. Barriers to engaging in work will be discussed and current research on various medical conditions that impede participation will be incorporated. Assessments and interventions related to the working population will be introduced. The importance of establishing relationships with case managers and vocational rehabilitation counselors is discussed.

OT 646  School Based OT Elective    1 sem. hr.

This course will explore school-based occupational therapy in depth. Students will learn to identify problems related to the client’s educational experience and develop relationships with caregivers, teachers, and other team members to maximize care.

OT 648  Adv Topics in Geriatrics-Elect    1 sem. hr.

Students will explore additional topics related to the geriatric population and develop advanced assessment and intervention techniques for use with older adults in a variety of settings.

OT 650  Intl Practice in OT-Elective    1 sem. hr.

Students will explore occupational therapy in practice in a developing country in relationship to culture, economic, environmental and socio-political factors and definition of the profession. An understanding of the needs for occupational therapy in underserved areas of the world will lead to development of models for practice and education in occupational therapy for those areas.

OT 660  Lvl II Fieldwork AB    7 sem. hrs.

This is the first Level II Fieldwork experience. Students will be placed in a setting or settings that deliver occupational therapy services, for a minimum of 12 weeks. Students will practice knowledge of the OT process, clinical reasoning, and evidence based practice under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist.

OT 662  Lvl II Fieldwork CD    7 sem. hrs.

This is the second Level II Fieldwork experience. Students will be placed in a setting or settings that deliver occupational therapy services, for a minimum of 12 weeks. Students will practice knowledge of the OT process, clinical reasoning, and evidence based practice under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapist.

Physical Therapy

PT 503  Human Anatomy    6 sem. hrs.

Human Anatomy is a foundational course in normal human anatomy, both gross anatomy and surface anatomy, using a regional approach. Classroom and laboratory experiences are designed to promote methods of learning that minimize memorization. Incorporation of basic biomechanical principles enhances learning by association. Emphasis is given to the neuromusculoskeletal system and is presented as consistent with physical therapy clinical practice.

PT 503L  Human Anatomy: Lab    0 sem. hrs.

PT 504  Foundations of Neuroscience    4 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to expand on previous science courses in order to provide a more in-depth understanding of the structure and function of the human nervous system in normal and pathological conditions. Material presented in this course provides the foundational science background for future applied courses related to physical therapy management of patients with conditions affecting the neuromuscular system. The course presents classroom and laboratory learning experiences that build from an understanding of basic nervous system functions at molecular and cellular levels to more complex functions involving whole systems. Structural changes in the nervous system are related to functional changes that occur during development, following injury, and with aging. A problem/ case study approach to learning is emphasized in order to further develop the student's critical inquiry and clinical decision-making abilities.

PT 504L  Found of Neuroscience Lab    0 sem. hrs.

PT 506  Foundations of Pharmacology    2 sem. hrs.

This course presents the foundational concepts of pharmacology emphasizing basic mechanisms of drug action such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Drug classes illustrated using prototypic drugs. Examples drawn from various body systems.

PT 511  Foundations of Clin Science    4 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the student physical therapist to the process of clinical examination including problem solving and clinical decision-making as well as introduction to foundational interventions. Using the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice the course focuses on physical therapy examination, evaluation, and basic treatment interventions as preparation for individuals with functional limitations related to movement. The course includes an introduction to examination techniques (tests and measures) common to the evaluation process (history, upper and lower quarter screens). Instruction also includes foundational intervention techniques and concepts such as patient communication and documentation; transfers; gait training with assistive devices; body mechanics; positioning and draping integral to examination and intervention; range of motion and manual muscle testing assessments; electrotherapeutic and heat/cold physical agents.

PT 5151A  Biomechanics I    2 sem. hrs.

Material in this course includes 1) the basic principles of biomechanics related to stability and movement; 2) biomechanics of biologic structures and function of the musculoskeletal system, with in depth description of the structural and functional features of major joints of the human body; and 3) an introduction to human movement analysis.

PT 5151B  Biomechanics II    2 sem. hrs.

Second foundational science course in Biomechanics. Material in this course includes 1) biomechanics of biologic structures and function of the musculoskeletal system, with in depth description of the structural and functional features of major joints of the human body; 2) human movement analysis.; and 3) normal human gait.

PT 603  Human Anatomy    6 sem. hrs.

Human Anatomy is a foundational course in normal human anatomy, both gross anatomy and surface anatomy, using a regional approach. Classroom and laboratory experiences are designed to promote methods of learning that minimize memorization. Incorporation of basic biomechanical principles enhances learning by association. Emphasis is given to the neuromusculoskeletal system and is presented as consistent with physical therapy clinical practice.

PT 603L  Human Anatomy: Lab    0 sem. hrs.

PT 604  Foundations of Neuroscience    4 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to expand on previous science courses in order to provide a more in-depth understanding of the structure and function of the human nervous system in normal and pathological conditions. Material presented in this course provides the foundational science background for future applied courses related to physical therapy management of patients with conditions affecting the neuromuscular system. The course presents classroom and laboratory learning experiences that build from an understanding of basic nervous system functions at molecular and cellular levels to more complex functions involving whole systems. Structural changes in the nervous system are related to functional changes that occur during development, following injury, and with aging. A problem/ case study approach to learning is emphasized in order to further develop the student's critical inquiry and clinical decision-making abilities.

PT 604L  Found of Neuroscience:Lab    0 sem. hrs.

PT 605  Motor Learning/Motor Control    3 sem. hrs.

This course is a foundational course applicable to entry-level physical therapy practice pertaining to acquiring, controlling, and perfecting movement skill. The course will explore the application of the principles of motor control and motor learning as they apply to healthy individuals and those individuals with a variety of physical therapy impairments. In addition, students will explore motor control across development with an emphasis on reflexes and functional postures; general motor learning principles specific to the pediatric population will be introduced. This foundational knowledge will form a framework for both assessment and treatment of the neurologically involved child or adult and serve as a transitional course to expand on prior knowledge of neuroscience, therapeutic activities, and therapeutic exercise in preparation for subsequent course work.

PT 606  Foundations of Pharmacology    2 sem. hrs.

This course presents the foundational concepts of pharmacology emphasizing basic mechanisms of drug action such as pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Drug classes illustrated using prototypic drugs. Examples drawn from various body systems.

PT 608  Found of Clinical Exercise    4 sem. hrs.

This course examines in depth the mechanisms of muscle function, the principles of therapeutic exercise, and the practical application of exercise. The basic skills of clinical interventions including range of motion, stretching and flexibility, strengthening (strength, endurance and power training), balance, and aerobic training will be covered in depth. This information will prepare the student to critically think about, evaluate, and implement a plan of care for paper and live patients involving a variety of diagnoses.

PT 611  Foundations of Clin Science    4 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the student physical therapist to the process of clinical examination including problem solving and clinical decision-making as well as introduction to foundational interventions. Using the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice the course focuses on physical therapy examination, evaluation, and basic treatment interventions as preparation for individuals with functional limitations related to movement. The course includes an introduction to examination techniques (tests and measures) common to the evaluation process (history, upper and lower quarter screens). Instruction also includes foundational intervention techniques and concepts such as patient communication and documentation; transfers; gait training with assistive devices; body mechanics; positioning and draping integral to examination and intervention; range of motion and manual muscle testing assessments; electrotherapeutic and heat/cold physical agents.

PT 612  PT Mgmt of Mus-Skel Impair I    3 sem. hrs.

This course is the first in a series of three courses on evaluation and treatment of general musculoskeletal conditions. All relevant physiologic, anatomic, pathologic, medical and therapeutic concepts related to general musculoskeletal conditions are integrated into this course. Information in this course includes the general physical therapy evaluation process, basic pathology, tissue injury and the healing process, and the integration of previous information covered in the curriculum. The course utilizes classroom and laboratory experiences to expose the student to simple problems in order to begin to develop the clinical reasoning skills required in entry-level practice. Emphasis is on basic evaluation technique in orthopedic and manual physical therapy and the implementation of therapeutic intervention techniques learned in other courses. This course provides the foundation for PT 613 and PT 614.

PT 613  PT Mgmt of Mus-Skel Impair II    5 sem. hrs.

An integrated approach to the study of all relevant physiologic, anatomic,pathologic, medical and therapeutic concepts related to entry-level physical therapy practice. The course is the second course in the continuation Musculoskeletal Impairments series and includes the physical therapy evaluation process, physical therapeutic intervention techniques and procedures, and patient care plan development for spinal impairments and upper quarter. This course is to build on foundational skills in neuro-musculoskeletal assessment. The course presents classroom and laboratory experiences to develop simple to complex problems to assist the student in developing the necessary clinical reasoning and clinical skills. Emphasis is on basic evaluation techniques in orthopedic and manual physical therapy with an introduction to special test diagnostic accuracy and interpretation. It provides the foundation for selection of appropriate assessment and treatment planning in orthopedics. Students learn an evidence-based approach to screening, examination, and evaluation which all involve a critical thinking process to establish an orthopedic impairment based physical therapy diagnosis.

PT 614  PT Mgmt of Mus-Skel Impair III    5 sem. hrs.

An integrated approach to the study of all relevant physiologic, anatomic, pathologic, medical and therapeutic concepts related to entry-level physical therapy practice regarding the upper and lower extremity. The course is a continuation of PT 612/613, Musculoskeletal Impairments I/II and includes the physical therapy evaluation process, physical therapeutic intervention techniques and procedures, and patient care plan development. The course presents classroom and laboratory experiences building from simple to complex problems to assist the student in developing the necessary competencies in physical therapy. Emphasis is on basic evaluation techniques in orthopedic and manual physical therapy with an introduction to special test diagnostic accuracy and interpretation. It provides the foundation for selection of appropriate assessment and treatment planning in orthopedics. Students refine their approach to screening, examination, and evaluation of extremity impairments with integration of spinal screening. This involves the critical thinking process to establish an orthopedic impairment based physical therapy diagnosis and subsequent treatment plan.

PT 6151A  Biomechanics I    2 sem. hrs.

Material in this course includes 1) the basic principles of biomechanics related to stability and movement; 2) biomechanics of biologic structures and function of the musculoskeletal system, with in depth description of the structural and functional features of major joints of the human body; and 3) an introduction to human movement analysis.

PT 6151B  Biomechanics II    2 sem. hrs.

Second foundational science course in Biomechanics. Material in this course includes 1) biomechanics of biologic structures and function of the musculoskeletal system, with in depth description of the structural and functional features of major joints of the human body; 2) human movement analysis.; and 3) normal human gait.

PT 701  Professional Issues I    1 sem. hr.

This course is an introduction to the profession of physical therapy. Distinguishing factors of a profession, including the history of the profession and responsibilities of health care professionals are covered. Students are introduced to national, state and regional professional organizations. The topics of legal and ethical considerations are also covered. Students are guided through the discovery of practice expectations and the growth of the profession over the past century.Students are also expected to participate in professional development activities.

PT 702  Professional Issues II    1 sem. hr.

The course is designed to prepare the student physical therapist for clinical practice. Students build upon knowledge and skills gained in Professional Issues I. Students are introduced to the roles of various participants in clinical practice and the assessment tools utilized during clinical education. Issues related to legal and ethical clinical practice are covered.

PT 703  Professional Experience I    4 sem. hrs.

This is the first of four clinical education experiences within the curriculum. Professional Experience I introduces the student to the general organization of a physical therapy practice that pertains to the care of individuals with musculoskeletal dysfunction either in an inpatient or outpatient setting. Students are responsible, under the direct guidance of a licensed clinical mentor, for the examinaton, evaluation, diagnostic, prognostic and intervention components for patient care. The specific content will vary depending upon the learning experiences available and the perceived or declared readiness of each student.

PT 704  Professional Experience II    4 sem. hrs.

This is the second of four clinical education experiences within the curriculum. Professional Experience II provides the student the opportunity to participate in a physical therapy practice that pertains to the care of varied individuals across the lifespan. Primary emphasis is on those who experience acute or chronic neurological dysfunctions and/or acute cardiopulmonary and/or integumentary dysfunctions. Professional Experience II primarily occurs in an inpatient acute,post-acute or rehabilitation settings. Some students may participate in an outpatient neurological or general medicine rotation. Under the direct guidance of a licensed physical therapist/clinical mentor, students are responsible for the examination, evaluation, diagnostic, prognostic and intervention components for patient care. Students are expected to function as part of a multi-disciplinary team and to participate in practice management activities. The specific content will vary depending upon the learning experiences available and the perceived or declared readiness of each student.

PT 705  Professional Experience III    5 sem. hrs.

This is the third of four clinical education experiences within the curriculum.Professional Experience III provides the student the opportunity to participate in a physical therapy practice that pertains to the care of individuals across the lifespan, with emphasis on those who experience acute or chronic neurological, integumentary, and/or cardiopulmonary dysfunctions. Professional Experience III primarily occurs in an inpatient acute, sub-acute, or rehabilitation practice setting.Some students may participate in an outpatient pediatric or a community based neurological rotation or a combined inpatient/outpatient rotation. Students are responsible, under the direct guidance of a licensed clinical instructor/clinical mentor, for the examination, evaluation, diagnostic, prognostic and intervention components for patient care. Students are expected to function as part of a multi-disciplinary team, and participate in practice management activities. The specific content will vary depending upon the learning experiences available and the perceived or declared readiness of each student.

PT 706  Professional Experience IV    6 sem. hrs.

This is the fourth and final clinical education experience within the curriculum. Professional Experience IV is scheduled after the completion of all didactic coursework in the basic, behavioral and clinical science courses. This course provides the student the opportunity to participate in a physical therapy practice that pertains to the care of individuals across the lifespan who experience neuromusculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, or integumentary dysfunctions. Practice settings may vary based upon a student’s clinical interests. Students may also be given the opportunity to focus on an area of interest involving either a specialized patient population (i.e. geriatrics, pediatrics), practice management or clinical research application. During this experience, students have the opportunity to function behaviorally as would professional physical therapists, with the exception that the clinical instructor is responsible for the student's provision of service and monitors the student's decision-making process during the examination, evaluation, diagnostic, prognostic and intervention components for patient care.Students are expected to function as part of a multi-disciplinary team, and participate in practice management activities. The specific content will vary depending upon the learning experiences available and the perceived or declared readiness of each student.

PT 710  Health Care Business Mgmt I    2 sem. hrs.

The course is the first course addressing health care business management issues impacting physical therapy practice. Students are introduced to special topics related to access, cost and quality of care. Particular emphasis is on the United States Health Care delivery system, the continuum of care, reimbursement, interdisciplinary team management, direct access and autonomous practice.

PT 711  Health Care Business Mgmt II    2 sem. hrs.

This course provides the student with an enhanced view of the healthcare system in the United States. The primary aim is to ensure that students are prepared to enter the healthcare system with an ability to contribute in the administration of contemporary and ethical physical therapist practice. The course includes requisite knowledge and application activities to develop an appreciation of public health, including a working understanding of health promotion and wellness as well as a physical therapist's role in primary prevention. Activities are included to enhance the learners' appreciation of a variety of health care professionals and their respective roles in modern interdisciplinary patient care. Students will also acquire an awareness of business principles, including resource and financial management principles required for the administration of a physical therapist practice.

PT 712  Community Health in PT    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the concept of community health care in relation to physical therapist practice. Physical therapists role in health prevention, promotion and wellness across the lifespan in community based and non-traditional settings are addressed. Students develop a community health program that meets a community need that prepares them for their role as primary health care providers. Students also prepare for the role of clinical teaching.

PT 713  Service Project    1 sem. hr.

A commitment to community service is an inherent part of the mission at Walsh University and the Physical Therapy program. Students provide direct community service as part of their academic experience within the physical therapy curriculum. During this course, students deliver the community program that was approved during semester 7 in conjunction with PT 712 Community Health in Physical Therapy.

PT 720  Research Methodology I    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to introduce students to the research process. Taught from an epidemiological perspective, learners within the course will appreciate different types of study design and the hierarchy of evidence. This course will also introduce students to the interpretation of descriptive and inferential statistics including effect sizes. Students will apply their knowledge by being immersed in the research process through the completion of a systematic review of the literature. This process will provide students with experience in the searching for relevant literature, using various sources of information and technology, working with a health sciences librarian, and writing scientifically with the oversight of a faculty member.

PT 721  Research Methodology II    2 sem. hrs.

Taught from an epidemiological perspective, learners will be exposed to different types of data and statistical analyses. Through this, students will develop the ability to interpret statistical results and inferences that can be drawn from various types of analyses. This course further immerses students in the research process with the intention of developing the skills needed to synthesize research findings and write scientifically. Students will complete the scholarly project that was initiated in PT720 (a systematic review of the literature), with the intention of submission to a peer-reviewed venue.

PT 722  Research Methodology III    1 sem. hr.

This course teaches studants to critically appraise and evaluate sources of research evidence. Within this process, students will develop the ability to discern the applicability of research findings to specific patient populations and to the practice of physical therapy. This will contribute to the development of a deeper appreciation for evidence based and evidence informed practice.

PT 723  Research Methodology IV    2 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to improve a student's ability to present scholarly work in a professional, effective, and interesting manner. The course will discuss written, verbal, and demonstrative methods of disseminating research deliverables within professional venues. Students will complete the groups' reserch projects and present their works at the Physical Therapy Program Research Symposium.

PT 730  PT Mgmt of Neuro-Mus Impair I    6 sem. hrs.

This course is the first within a series of two neurological courses presenting an integrated approach to relevant physiologic, anatomic, theoretical, medical, andtherapeutic concepts related to entry-level neurologic physical therapist practice in both adult and pediatric populations. The two Physical Therapy Management of Neuromuscular Impairment courses will operate from a top-down model across the neural axis, focusing initially on central nervous system diagnoses of cortical dysfunction, injury, and recovery. Students will gain knowledge, skills, and the capacity for the clinical reasoning necessary to complete a comprehensive neuromuscular examination and develop a comprehensive plan for interventionbased on current motor control and learning theories. Pediatric contentis interwoven within the course.

PT 731  PT Mgmt of Neuro-Mus Impair II    6 sem. hrs.

This course is the second within a series of two neurological courses presenting an integrated approach to relevant physiologic, anatomic, theoretical, medical, andtherapeutic concepts related to entry-level neurologic physical therapist practice in both adult and pediatric populations. It is a direct extension of PT 730 (Physical Therapy Management of Neuromuscular Impairments I), continuing with diagnoses along the neural axis, progressing from the central nervous system and moving to more of a focus on peripheral nervous system dysfunction. Students will continue to gain fundamental knowledge to develop the clinical reasoning and critical thinking necessary to complete a detailed neuromuscular examination and develop a comprehensive plan for intervention based on current motor control and learning theories. Pediatric content is interwoven within the course.

PT 732  PT Mgmt Multi System Impairmnt    4 sem. hrs.

Many patients that Physical Therapists encounter often have multiple systems that are impaired that ultimately affect their functional capabilities. This course integrates the many areas that have been discussed previously in the curriculum and aims to help the student focus their management strategies in the areas of medical screening and differential diagnosis. Complex patient cases involving multi-systems will be utilized throughout the course and the student will be responsible for demonstrating sound decision making processes based on best available evidence. In essence this course will help prepare the student physicaltherapist for autonomous practice

PT 734  PT Mgmt Cardio/Respir Impair I    4 sem. hrs.

An integrated approach to the study of all relevant anatomic, physiologic, pathological, medical and therapeutic (invasive and surgical) concepts related to physical therapy practice in the area of cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine (diabetes) and integumentary impairments. The course includes commonly used physical therapy examination and therapeutic techniques and procedures, along with patient-care program development focused on the inpatient setting. Emphasis is placed on thorough review of medical history to help ensure safety during patient care.

PT 735  PT Mgmt Cardio/Respir ImpairII    5 sem. hrs.

An integrated approach to the study of all relevant physiologic, anatomic,pathological, medical and therapeutic concepts related to physical therapy practice in the area of cardiovascular, pulmonary, integumentary, endocrine, hematology, immunology, oncology, genitourinary and gastrointestinal impairments. The course includes the physical therapy diagnostic process, physical therapeutic techniques and procedures, and patient-care program development. The course presents classroom and laboratory experiences building from simple to complex problems to assist the student in developing the competencies necessary for practice as a generalist in physical therapy. Experiences related to psychological, social, cultural,economic, and vocational aspects of illness and disability are included. Concepts are cumulative throughout the system(s) and continued enrollment depends upon mastery and use of previous concepts.

PT 736  Capstone Sem:Clin Decis Making    2 sem. hrs.

The capstone course is usually taken in the final year of a program and is designed to showcase a student's comprehensive knowledge of the subject they have studied in various courses over their academic career. The course is sectioned into critical parts of the DPT's profession from graduation of entry level into their professional career, NPTE and jurisprudence examinations, professional development and professional advocacy.

PT 740  Special Topics    1 sem. hr.

This elective course involves advanced study (beyond entry level) of selected examination and/or intervention techniques. Topics vary from semester to semester and from year to year.

PT 74001  Special Topics: Pediatrics    2 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to provide an overview of general pediatric practice, including developmental parameters and legal historical perspectives. It will progress through a foundational basis for pediatric premises and proceed to an overview of assessment, evaluation, and intervention approaches for specific diagnoses in the specialty practice with pediatric patients. While depth of all diagnoses will not be explored, different case studies will be used to clarify the contextual basis of evidence based practice across settings and within relevant services provision models. This class will build on the pediatric diagnoses and evaluation/intervention process covered in neurologic rehabilitation PT 730 & PT 731.

PT 74006  Special Topics: Diag Img    1 sem. hr.

This course includes the study of the common diagnostic and therapeutic imaging studies such as radiographs, CAT, MRI, and musculoskeletal imaging as they pertain to patient/client management in physical therapy.

PT 742  Life Span    3 sem. hrs.

Life Span prepares students to understand the physical, social, emotional and intellectual growth and development throughout the life span. Instructional content includes child development theories and research; adulthood; geriatrics; and death and dying.