English (ENG)

ENG 100  Writing Workshop    3 sem. hrs.

Intensive work in writing paragraphs and short essays to remedy basic errors in grammar, usage, and syntax. Students should expect to spend 8 to 10 hours per semester in The Writing Center for individualized study and tutorial assistance. Computer lab used to develop writing skills. Does not fulfill core requirement in English. By placement test only. Offered every semester.

ENG 101  Exploration of Self    3 sem. hrs.

A study of the writing process with the personal essay as its goal. Students compose informal and autobiographical essays after studying model works representing various cultures and writings. Does not fulfill core requirement in English. By placement test, upon completion of ENG 100, or as an elective. Offered every semester.

ENG 102  Read/Writing Connections    3 sem. hrs.

An introduction to research emphasizing those skills essential to production of the formal research paper. Students learn the principles of argumentation and close textual analysis, including the ability to summarize, paraphrase, annotate, document, and critically interpret sources. Students also study the nature of academic argument and oral presentation. Students take an assessment test at the end of the course. Those scoring under 3 on the test must immediately take an upper level writing course designated by the department as part of their English core requirement. Fulfills core requirement. Prerequisite for all subsequent English courses. Offered every semester.

ENG 110  Bldg Coll Lit/Study Skills    3 sem. hrs.

Survey that introduces first-year students to selected study, testing, and time management skills necessary for successful completion of both core and elective college classes. Two hours per week of in-class coursework through lecture and group-work activities, with special emphasis placed on preparation for reading-intensive courses. Remaining weekly hour to be fulfilled through required tutoring in reading, math, and/or writing skills. By placement only.

ENG 111-1  Explor of Self in Community    3 sem. hrs.

This course is the first of a two-semester introduction to writing centered upon a study of cultural pluralism in the U.S. This first semester focuses on improving grammar, style, and written expression in personal narratives, along with increasing reading comprehension. The second semester's course, ENG 111-2, will continue the emphasis upon reading comprehension but introduces various modes of academic writing. Required tutoring weekly in writing and reading. Equivalent to ENG 100 and ENG 101. Does not fulfill core proficiency in writing. By placement test only. Students who successfully complete this sequence should follow it with ENG 102. Offered every Fall semester.

ENG 111-2  Explor of Self in Community    3 sem. hrs.

This course is the second of a two-semester introduction to writing centered upon a study of cultural pluralism in the U.S. The first semester's course (ENG 111-1) focused on improving grammar, style, and written expression in personal narratives, along with increasing reading comprehension. This second semester's course continues the emphasis upon reading comprehension but introduces various modes of academic writing. Required tutoring weekly in writing and reading. Equivalent to ENG 100 and ENG 101. Does not fulfill core proficiency in writing. Students who successfully complete this sequence should follow it with ENG 102. Offered every Spring semester.

ENG 119  Drama Practicum    1 sem. hr.

Performance of assigned activities for the Genesius Players production under faculty or director supervision. NOTE: Students work the equivalent of at least two hours per week for each semester hour of academic credit. No more than 8 semester hours of practicum credits will count toward graduation. Offered every semester.

ENG 200-1  T1:Studies in Short Fiction    3 sem. hrs.

This course engages students in a study of the specialized formal structures and literary devices of the short story. The course may focus on specific genres of short fiction, historical periods, or authors, but the overall goal is to allow students to practice their ability to read and think critically, evaluate, texts, and demonstrate their understanding through class discussions, presentations, and writing. Thematic focus may change each semester. (See special descriptions in schedule.) Fulfills Tier I requirement. Offered every semester, with detective story focus in SP-18 for students in Forensic Studies.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 200-2  T1:DV:Cre Eq:Iss of Gen/Rac    3 sem. hrs.

Students will study why race and gender remain paramount issues in American culture, a culture that has historically defined itself, at least theoretically as moored in the ideals of equality. We will study works by both male and female authors, and works written by authors of various racial, social, and cultural backgrounds in order to investigate the modes of oppression and the contrast between American rhetoric and the realities of race and gender that exist in much of American life.

ENG 200-3  T1:DV:Body in Pain:La Ill/Suff    3 sem. hrs.

Reading representations of disease against expressions of pain, this class studies the language of illness and suffering as it manifests itself in aesthetic, historical, medical, and philosophical discourse.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 200-4  T1:Money and Success    3 sem. hrs.

Changing attitudes toward the role of money and success in American society are examined through selected literature. Tests are studied within the historical and cultural contexts in which they were written.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 200-5  T1:Intro to Drama    3 sem. hrs.

Drama stages the challenges that face us as individuals, families and societies. It enables us to step into the roles of others and explore the issues, both personal and political, that face humanity. In this course, we will read many examples of this genre from many different countries and time periods, taking a cultural and historical perspective. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 200-6  T1:DV:On Food    3 sem. hrs.

This class concerns the alliance between film, food, and fiction. It is a course about the language of food and deals with issues such as the proximity between culinary and verbal signs, visual gastronomy, and the reference function of a meal. Between appetite and the act of eating, food is a form of communication that in itself contains an entire cultural discourse as it is brought to the mouth with fingers, forks, or chopsticks. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 200-8  T1:Graphic Novels as Art&Liter    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on reading, writing about, and creating comics and graphic novels. We will examine the medium's storytelling potential, its unique visual grammar, and the cultural, aesthetic and theoretical contexts of the genre and individual works. .

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 200-9  T1:DV:Women in Literature    3 sem. hrs.

This course attempts to reveal the ways in which literature can help students better understand the experiences of women in history and culture. We will study works by and about women in different periods in order to investigate the modes of oppression and the contrast between rhetoric, stereotypes, and representations of women's lives that exist in various literature. Because women have historically suffered by way of values perpetuated by patriarchal societies, it is especially important to explore the history of resistance and lived experiences represented in this literature.

ENG 201  T1:Lit of British Isles I    3 sem. hrs.

A study of literature of the British Isles from its beginnings to the 18th century. Emphasis on the major literary periods, highlighting significant authors and genres. Attention to multicultural influences, where appropriate. Fulfills Tier I requirement. Offered every fall.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 202  T1:Lit of British Isles II    3 sem. hrs.

A study of literature of the British Isles from the Romantic period to the present. Emphasis on major literary periods, highlighting significant authors and genres. Attention to multicultural influences, where appropriate. Fulfills Tier I requirement. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 203  T1:World Literature I    3 sem. hrs.

A study of literary works which provide insight into the social development and artistic achievement of the ancient world, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Fulfills Tier I requirement. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 204  T1:World Literature II    3 sem. hrs.

A study of representative literary works of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries which demonstrate the major social and artistic movements which have influenced western culture. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 205  T1:United States Literature I    3 sem. hrs.

Using a number of critical approaches, this course examines literary works from the colonial period through the Civil War that represent the pluralistic composition of the nation and illustrate significant literary, intellectual and social developments. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 206  T1:United States Literature II    3 sem. hrs.

Using a number of critical approaches, this course examines literary works from the Civil War to the present that represent the pluralistic composition of the nation and illustrate significant literary, intellectual and social developments. Fulfills Tier I requirement. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 207  T1:DV:Literat & Gender Theory    3 sem. hrs.

This course serves as the foundation of the Gender Studies minor and addresses questions such as: What is gender/gender theory? How do various theories of gender help us understand literature? How has the development of gender identity in men and women been expressed in texts? The student will be introduced to perspectives on gender from history, psychology, sociology, and literary studies that enrich our reading of texts and that demonstrate how the construction and representation of gender in society has developed. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 211  Speech    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the principles of effective speaking with emphasis on speech construction, audience analysis, and organization. Practice in extemporaneous speaking. Required for Communication majors and minors, Corporate Communication majors and Education majors. Offered every semester.

ENG 220  Introduction Creative Writing    3 sem. hrs.

Practice in writing fiction, poetry, and autobiography, and/or drama. This course will also stress ways in which the practice of writing can enhance skills of reading and interpreting literary works through analysis of contemporary and classical examples of each genre. Writing workshop format for discussion of student drafts. ENG 220 required for English and AYA Language Arts majors. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 230  Literacy, Form and Function    3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the study of language from a theoretical and applied perspective. As a prescriptive study, students will focus on the actual constructs of Standard English in order to improve their own reading and writing skills. As a descriptive study, students will focus on other nonstandard forms of English and how language functions in society. Education students will understand how to teach language skills to students from different social communities and gain insight into how language is used in specific situations. Students in other fields, particularly Sociology or Psychology, will understand how language functions as a symbolic system in human communities. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 240  Professional Writing I    3 sem. hrs.

An introduction to writing in the workplace, this course will emphasize traditional aspects such as job application materials, memo formats, proposals, and discourse analysis. These traditional materials are developed in electronic media as students develop their own web pages in order to immerse themselves in the world of professional writing today. Students develop their web presence using HTML and image processing software. They also become familiar with PowerPoint and the fine art of writing presentations. Offered every semester.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 299  Intro to Literary Interp/Criti    3 sem. hrs.

A gateway course required for English majors, this course engages students in close critical reading and analysis of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and drama, with attention to the ways texts achieve meaning. With an overall attention to nuances of genre, students will attend to a variety of literary devices such as figurative language, imagery, diction, formal structure, characterization, and setting. The course also will ask students to employ in oral presentations and a writing project at least one or two modes of contemporary critical theory. Ideally taken before English majors or literature minors begin their 300-level elective experiences. Open only to English majors and literature minors or with permission from instructor or division chair. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 314  H2b:The Literary Essay    3 sem. hrs.

The course examines the various ways that writers use the genre of the essay as an instrument of social and political change. The focus of the course will vary semester-by-semester, ranging from the satirical works of Horace and Juvenal to the more contemporary modes of essay writing in the 21st century. Students will demonstrate comprehension of this genre through knowledge of historical perspective, critical analysis, and writing. Next offered SP-18.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 315  DV:Special Topics in Litera    3 sem. hrs.

Next offered TBA.

ENG 315-1  H1:ST:21st Cent:Chal Conte Fi    3 sem. hrs.

What can a best seller tell us about what it means to be human in today's world? What about the Catholic Church? In this class, we will read a variety of contemporary literature in the context of current problems identified in Vatican II's Gaudium et Spes. We will focus on political, personal, environmental, and feminist issues as we examine the challenges of the 21st century through the eyes of the Catholic Church with the contemporary reader. Next offered SP-17.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 315-2  DV:H1:Amer Indi Lit/Env Jus    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines how the place of nature in contemporary American Indian literature challenges the dominant views of nature that shape polarized discussions in America today on almost every environmental issue. The course will examine how solutions to environmental problems currently facing many Indian tribes are not to be found in either Romantic or Enlightenment views of nature, and how American Indian philosophy offers alternative ways to think about the relationship between society and nature. The course will use literature, philosophy, history and the principles of postmodern social theory to examine these issues. Fulfills Diversity requirement. ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required.

ENG 315-3  H1:DV:American West in Literat    3 sem. hrs.

Using the lives of George Armstrong Custer and the Lakota warrior Crazy Horse as its starting point, this course examines, through the fiction, poetry, and autobiography of American Indian writers, the origins of and the continuing conflicts between Euro-American and American Indian cultures. The course explores the themes and motifs that have preoccupied American Indian authors since the late 19th century. Next offered SP-18.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 315-5  The Poetics of Space    3 sem. hrs.

This class acknowledges the tremendous impact of spatial structures on our lives, from very concrete practice to abstract theory. More importantly, it will investigate those spaces that have attracted the imagination and those the imagination has created for itself. This course is built with the intention that space becomes a question and ceases to be self-evident, if, indeed, living means to pass from one space to another. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 315-6  H2b:Solitudes    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literary expression of the theme of solitude. The literary works selected may vary from semester to semester. The traditions addressed in this course are those literary traditions which involve an attention to both the transcendent and existential qualities of solitude: expressions of the uniqueness, integrity, and dignity of the individual, along with expressions of loneliness, alienation, despair, angst. The experience of solitude, expressed in literary language, involves both writer and reader, and students, in writing to the Catholic tradition, the course will also engage with relevant passages from Gaudium et spes. Next offered F-17.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 315-7  Studies in the Sublime    3 sem. hrs.

This class concerns the iridescent aesthetic category of the sublime, a concept that can boast a philosophical tradition going back to antiquity. Still, a consensus as to what exactly it involves has yet to be reached. Focusing on architecture, fiction, painting, sculpture, and treatise, this course reconstructs theories about the expressions of the sublime moment from the 18th to the 20th centuries. ENG 102 or HON 103 competencies required. Next offered TBA.

ENG 315-8  H2b:Reflec Baroq:FrEmer to Ret    3 sem. hrs.

This class approaches the cultural period of the Baroque from the question of the readability of signs that emerged during the late 16th and 17th centuries. We can attempt semiotic analyses of Baroque works because we have critical concepts available that outright call for this engagement, while we interpret Baroque arts, encounter concepts of contemporary critical theory, and discuss these in relation to each other. ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required. Next offered TBA.

ENG 31510  H2b:Utopian & Dystopian Lit    3 sem. hrs.

The purpose of this course is to explore, using representative examples from British, American, Russian and Native American authors, what social, political, technological, and economic conditions must exist to create the best possible society, or what in human nature will preclude society from ever reaching what the human mind can imagine. Each of the works examined will raise significant issues about hat must be considered in imagining a more perfect world, or in considering why such a dream is impossible. Fulfills heritage IIb requirement. Next offered TBA.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 31511  H3:Cult Poetics of Rock/Roll    3 sem. hrs.

Over the past fifty years Rock and Roll has emerged from an adolescent craze into a major cultural force in American (and World) culture. Rock and Roll has become a complex interdisciplinary, multimedia field in itself - involving elements of music, poetry, multicultural social commentary, performance art, fashion, recording technology, film and video technology, and marketing demographics. This course will pursue a serious interdisciplinary analysis, seeking to account for the social impact of rock and roll by examining the several cultural "languages" which coalesce to create this highly complex media form. ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required. Next offered TBA.

ENG 31512  H1:Beauty/Desi:Pur Aesth Ideal    3 sem. hrs.

Are ideals of beauty "universal"? From the nineteenth century to the present, literature and the arts have challenged tradition conceptions of beauty, at times challenging the very value of the "Beautiful" itself. Engaging with the literature, the arts, and contemporary popular culture, this course will explore these challenges. How significant, today, is the concept of beauty in our understanding of art, culture, religion-of ourselves and our world in general? What kinds of beauty (or anti-beauty) do we desire today? Why? How is this reflected in our cultural productions and what does this say about us? Fulfills heritage I requirement. Next offered F-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 31513  H1:Green Myth:Stu in Lit Ec    3 sem. hrs.

Class discussions and individual projects will question ways in which literary conceptions of nature relate to contemporary attitudes toward nature and ecology. With an interdisciplinary eye toward current ecological discourse including deep ecology, social ecology, feminist ecology, and writings by contemporary scientists, this course explores multiple interpretations of the natural environment as reflected in myth and literature from several historical periods. Note: This course is offered as part of teh Environmental minor, the Environmental Core-Cluster and as a Tier 2 Heritage 1 (challenges) course in the current gen Ed Curriculum. As such we will alo explore ways literary ecology and myth correspond to Catholic viewpoints expressed in Gaudium et Spes. Fulfills Heritage I requirement. Next offered F-18.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 31514  H2b:Romanticism    3 sem. hrs.

The Romantic Period offers a body of creative works unparalleled in the expressive energy and philosophical ambition. Emerging from the philosophical challenges of Enlightenment humanism, the political upheavals of democratic revolutions in America and Europe, the social-economic realignments of the burgeoning industrial revolution, this literature continues to be significant to our understanding of self, nature and society. Next offered SP-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 31515  Spec Top for International Stu    3 sem. hrs.

Studies in special topics in literature or language that arise from an international experience. Students may create their own study in conjunction with an overseas instructor or enroll in a course through an international studies program.

ENG 31516  H1:Classical Mythology in Lit    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on literature in translation with an emphasis in Greco-Roman myths. The goals is to study the oral evolution of classical myth and think about the ways in which these myths are presented in current written literature. We will examine mythic narrative variants, explore the multiformity of myths, and discuss dominant themes, such as conflict and violence. No formal study of language or literature is required. Next offered SP-17.

ENG 316  H2b:Autobiographica Literature    3 sem. hrs.

Traditionally speaking, an autobiography presents the truthful account of the author's life. This course explores the ways in which men and women have had to meet the challenges of that tradition given the personal, political, social, and religious constraints under which they historically lived. Perceptions of gender will be discussed and linked to both course readings and to the tradition presented in Gaudium et Spes. Next offered SP-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 318  H2b:The Novel    3 sem. hrs.

This course engages students in a study of the formal structures and literary devices of the novel. In light of Gaudium et Spes, it will also attend to the ways in which the novel is particularly suited to the exploration of significant questions concerning human nature. The focus of the course may vary from semester to semester (treating specific genres of the novel, historical contexts, or authors), but the overall goal is to allow students to demonstrate their understanding of the form through class discussions, presentations, and writing. Thematic focus may change. (See special descriptions in schedule.) Offered every spring semester, with detective novel focus in odd numbered years for students in Forensic Studies.

Prerequisites: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 320  Advanced Creative Writing    3 sem. hrs.

Sustained writing based on individual student interest in the genres of fiction, poetry, autobiography, and/or drama. Writing workshop format for discussion of student drafts. Emphasis on creation of longer works and intensive revisions. Fulfills core requirement. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 220 or with instructor's permission.

ENG 321  Composing Process    3 sem. hrs.

Principles and practice of various composition theories and classroom practices related to concerns of writing across the curriculum. Emphasizes computer skills in the teaching of composition, as well as tutoring and interpersonal skills. Required for Writing Center tutors, for AYA Language Arts majors, and MCE majors with a language arts concentration. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required.

ENG 323  H3:The Modern Rhetoric    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores current rhetorical theory and application. Topics include current computer issues and applications, the nature of the rhetorical voice in the computer setting, and questions of authorships. Course explores rhetoric in the workplace. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required.

ENG 324  H2b:African/American Litera    3 sem. hrs.

Through contemporary Black voices, this course explores how church, school, arts, and entertainment traditionally have empowered African Americans in their quest for self-determination. Next offered F-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required.

ENG 325  English Language    3 sem. hrs.

The history and structure of the English language with examination of the development of the language from its Indo-European roots to the present, as well as the principles of sturctural linguistics and transformational grammar. Required for English and AYA Language Arts majors. Fulfills core requirement. ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required.

ENG 330  AYA:Literature    3 sem. hrs.

Stresses the reading of adolescent literature and various modes and methods of teaching children to respond to literary texts. Required for AYA Language Arts majors, AYA Social Studies, and MCE majors with language arts concentration. Restricted to English, MCE and AYA Language Arts or Social Studies Majors by permission of instructor. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required.

ENG 331  Children's Literature    3 sem. hrs.

Stresses the reading of children's literature and various interdisciplinary modes and methods of teaching children to respond to literary texts. Required for ECE, ECIS, and INMO majors. Restricted to English and Education majors or with permission of instructor. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 335  H2b:Travel Writing    3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces students to the genre of travel writing with its rewards and difficulties. Students will write within the genre with at least one experience-gathering mission, traveling out of state in order to have a collective adventure about which to write. Next offered F-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 340  H3:Professional Writing II    3 sem. hrs.

The second course in the Professional Writing sequence, this course focuses on understanding the intricacies of professional writing as a problem-solving medium. Students will delve further into discourse analysis in the workplace and work with reports, summaries, and other forms of professional communication, in order to begin the process of becoming professionally literate. Working with community partners provids students with an audience outside of the classroom. Fufills H3 requirement ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required. Offered every spring semester.

ENG 341  Business Writing    3 sem. hrs.

(Formerly ENG219) Course designed to prepare students to write effectively for the business world. Close attention given to purpose, audience, and tone. Students practice writing in direct and indirect organizational patterns needed for routine messages, sensitive messages, short and long business reports, proposals, business plans, persuasion and sales, job applications, and resumes. Effective job interviewing and oral business presentations are also covered in detail. Fulfills core requirement. ENG 102 or HON 103 competency required. Offered every spring semester.

ENG 342  Grant Writing    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed to introduce students to the grant writing process, from idea to implementation, and give them opportunities to apply techniques discussed in class. Students will focus on the elements of winning grant proposals and making persuasive cases for support. Students also will study grant-writing theory and reflect upon the process of writing or this genre. This is an interactive, hands-on learning experience that will culminate in the student's production of grant proposals. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 343  Intro to Research Methodology    3 sem. hrs.

Students will examine the production, organization, and use of print and electronic information in the world today and develop the fundamental skills to recognize the need for information, retrieve it effectively, and analyze it using critical thinking skills. Students will develop an awareness of legal and ethical issues surrounding the use of information and research. They will apply these research skills to their academic, professional, and personal lives and learn techniques to maintain skills once they leave the academic arena. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 344  Intro to Technical Writing    3 sem. hrs.

The course focuses on helping students develop the specialized writing skills, information gathering techniques, and application literacy needed for technical communicators. Students learn to adapt to a variety of audiences in organizing and structuring technical documents such as policies, procedures, product descriptors, definitions, and user manuals, in print and online. Course also covers web-based document design and quality assurance testing. Offered Spring 2017.

ENG 375  Understanding Translation    3 sem. hrs.

This course, taught in English, will help students understand the demands of translating documents. Translation culture, the multiple layers of translation activities, and the differences between interpreting and translating will be featured. This course will be taught in English, but students with second and third language proficiencies from all languages are encouraged to attend. Offered as needed.

ENG 376  Intro to Cont Dev in Org Train    3 sem. hrs.

Organizations spend lots of time and money training employees. Increasingly these organizations desire the ability to standardize this training, realizing cost savings in both personnel and time. This course will help students understand how organizations create and maintain training modules, with a focus on content management and standardization and application literacy. Instructional design will also be introduced. Offered as needed.

ENG 377  Lit Culture in Transmedia Age    3 sem. hrs.

First offered Fall 2017/Spring 2018.

ENG 380  Film:Narrative and Theory    3 sem. hrs.

This course is geared to enhance students' understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of movies. Like a course in literature or music appreciation, "Film Appreciation" aims to familiarize students with the basic language of film, including its history as an art form, as well as the complex combination of techniques and technologies that make the art form powerful.

ENG 385  H3:Literature and Film    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the similarities and differences in how literary works and film narratives construct meaning. The course will include extensive discussions of the challenges film makers respond to when translating written works into the audio and visual language of film. In written projects and presentations students will incorporate critical readings and research (whcih can include literary criticism and interpretation, film theory and interpretation, narrative theory, etc.) into paper and presentation assignments. These assignments (which may, in part, include their original narratives translated into screenplays) will ask students to critique differences in literary works and film versions and to articulate, demonstrate and critically defend ways they would translate the the literary work into a film-adaption of their own. As this is an H3 Heritage course attention will also be given to ways literature and film respond to challenges presented in Gaudium et spes. Next offered F-18.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 401  Seminar in American Authors    3 sem. hrs.

An in-depth examination of the major body of work of selected American authors. Subject matter will vary from year to year. Next offered F-18.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 402  Sem:Authors of British Isle    3 sem. hrs.

An in-depth examination of the major body of work of selected authors from England, Ireland, Scotland and/or Wales. Subject matter will vary from year to year. Next offered SP-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 403  Sem:Comparative or Contine Lit    3 sem. hrs.

Using representative texts from a number of different countries and/or cultures, this course examines how literature both reflects and shapes the attitudes and values of various populations. Next offered F-17.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 420  Creative Writing:Pub/Perform    3 sem. hrs.

While focusing on larger self-generated projects, students may choose to work in any of the following genres: fiction, poetry, autobiography, creative non-fiction, and/or drama. Instructor will meet with students independently as well as in groups for intensive writing workshop sessions focused on discussion of student drafts. Students will actively explore publication and performance opportunities. Students may also explore opportunities for graduate study in creative writing and/or writing as a vocation. The course will require at least one public reading/performance. Prequisites: ENG 220, ENG 320, or with permission of both Division Chair and instructor. Offered every spring.

ENG 440  Adv Studies in Composition    3 sem. hrs.

Through an interdisciplinary approach to writing and rhetoric, students will explore the wide range of conversations that mark our culture. Focusing on ways that rhetoric works within their own disciplines, they will complete projects that will initiate them into writing for their own professions. Recommended for senior students. Recommended: ENG 323. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: ENG 102 or HON 103.

ENG 480  English Internship    1-5 sem. hrs.

Supervised work experience which permits students to use their language skills in an authentic setting outside the academic classroom by becoming involved in a business or non-profit organization's day-to-day operations. An on-the-job supervisor and a faculty member monitor and assess intern performance. Students work at least three hours per week for each semester hour of academic credit. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: Junior status and advanced writing competency.

ENG 490  Independent Study    3,4 sem. hrs.

Directed studies of specific topics in English language, literature or writing. Created with instructor and with permission of the Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Offered every semester.