Theology (THEO)

THEO 105  DV:Comparative Religions    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the history, practices, and teachings of Christianity and other major religions of the world (e.g., Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism). This is currently offered as an online course.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 106  T1:Script & the Catholic Trad    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores Sacred Scripture and Church Tradition as the dual sources of revelation for the Christian faith. Students will acquire a fundamental understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics, theological anthropology, and Church teaching. They will also apply critical thinking skills to theological inquiry.This course is the mandatory Tier 1 requirement for all students at Walsh University and is offered every semester.

THEO 200  H2a:Christian Theology to 1500    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the development of Christian thought from the time of the New Testament to the Protestant Reformation. Students will reinforce their critical thinking skills, reflect upon the work of the Holy Spirit in the history of the Catholic Church, and deepen their awareness of the Church's continual pursuit of truth through faith and reason. Offered in sequence with THEO 201.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 201  H2a:Christian Theo/1500 to Pre    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the development of Christian thought from the time of the Protestant Reformation to the present-day. Students will reinforce their critical thinking skills, reflect upon the work of the Holy Spirit in the history of the Catholic Church, and deepen their awareness of the Church's continual pursuit of truth through faith and reason. Offered every two years in sequence with THEO 200.

Prerequisites: THEO 106 and 200.

THEO 202  H2a:Christology    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the person, being and activity of Jesus of Nazareth in depth through an examination of biblical testimonies, early Church Councils, and contemporary theological methods. Students will reinforce their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics, theological anthropology, and Church teaching. They will also critically address the question of Jesus' contemporary relevance. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 203  H2a:Christian Moral Life    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines traditional notions of conscience, responsibility, authority, freedom and value in light of the Gospel. In addition to reinforcing their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics, theological anthropology, and Church teaching, students will critically discuss contemporary moral issues. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 205  H2a:DV:Church in the Mod Wrld    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the nature, mission, and structures of the Church in the context of contemporary society. Students will deepen their understanding of the practical implications of the Catholic Church's dogmatic and pastoral constitutions, which declare its responsibility to be a "sacrament of salvation" whose ministry transforms individuals and society. By considering specific examples of the Church's efforts to liberate and humanize, students will also gain greater appreciation for Christianity's global diversity and the Catholic Church's commitment to ecumenical unity and interfaith dialogue.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 207  H1:DV:African-Ameri Religion    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the African-African religious experience and the intellectual tradition stemming from it. Students will deepen their critical thinking skills by theologically engaging the writings of Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Angela Davis, Frederick Douglass, W.E.B. DuBois, M.L. King, Jr. and others. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 212  The Synoptic Gospels    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies Matthew, Mark, and Luke's gospels. Students will acquire competence in distinguishing the common narrative elements of these gospels from each evangelist's unique theological vision. Students will also deepen their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 213  Johannine Writings    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies those New Testament texts which Church tradition ascribes to the authorship of John the son of Zebedee (the Fourth Gospel, the Letters of John, and the Book of Revelation). Students will acquire competence in identifying and critically analyzing the distinctive theological ideas of these writings. They will also deepen their understanding of Catholic biblical hermeneutics. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 215  H2a:Old Testament Scriptures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literature and theology of the Old Testament: the Pentateuch, the Histories, the Poetical/Wisdom books, and the Prophets, including the Deutero-canonical literature unique to the Catholic Bible. Students will learn about modern scholarly theories concerning the formation of these texts. They will also deepen their knowledge of Catholic biblical hermeneutics and of the Church's dogmatic constitution on divine revelation. Offered Fall term.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 216  H2a:New Testament Scriptures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literature and theology of the New Testament: the Gospels and Acts, the Epistles, and the Apocalypse of the formation of these texts. They will also deepen their knowledge of Catholic biblical hermeneutics and of the Church's dogmatic constitution on divine revelation. Offered Spring term.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 271  H2a:Cathol Belief in Practice    3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys the theological concepts and spiritual practices that most distinguish Catholics within the diverse expressions of Christianity. Topics may include the Mass, the sacraments, sexual ethics, social ethics, types of prayer, and pilgrimage and forms of popular piety. Students will deepen their knowledge of Church teaching. They will also reflect upon the work of the Holy Spirit in the Church and deepen their awareness of the Church's continual pursuit of truth through faith and reason. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 289  H1:DV:Hate Groups and Violence    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the background, culture, and beliefs of individuals and movements that advocate hate. Students will study the psychological, philosophical, and religious origins of hate. They will also critically apply these interdisciplinary perspectives to anti-semitism, pogroms, the Holocaust, KKK, racism, and neofascism. This course includes a field trip to the U.S. Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., the costs for which are underwritten by the Ed and Ruth Wilkof Foundation. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 302  H3:Liturgy/Sacraments    3 sem. hrs.

This class studies Christian liturgy and sacraments as signs and instruments of divine grace in the life of the Church. By reflecting on these sources of Christian life, students will develop a summative understanding of Catholic theology. Offered Fall term.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 303  H2a:Theological Themes in Lit    3 sem. hrs.

This course employs literary works from a variety of traditions to identify the theological themes and values they address such as faith, prayer, good vs. evil and moral dilemmas. Students will examine these works to deepen their awareness of the importance of sound theological anthropology, critical thinking and how the Holy Spirit intersects with and challenges the lives of all. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 309  H2a:SL:Princ of Justice/Peace    3 sem. hrs.

This course considers justice and peace as core principles of the Gospel. By applying Catholic social teaching to the contemporary world, students will develop a summative understanding of theological anthropology and the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 310  H3:Contem Christian Spiritu    3 sem. hrs.

This course considers the demands of authentic Christian discipleship, the different vocations within which it is lived (married or single, lay or consecrated), and the major spiritualities that have emerged in response to those vocations. Students will integrate the biblical, theological, and historical sources of Christian faith in order to develop a spiritual exercise appropriate to their own life. Offered Spring term.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 317  H2a:RometoJer:AClashofCultures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the history, architecture, conflict and development of Roman and Jewish culture and religion during the first centuries BC and AD as a backdrop to the faith of Jesus. In addition to developing competency in critical thinking and dialogue, students will compare the two great civilizations and consider parallels between them and our contemporary culture. Cross-listed with JS 317. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 320  H3:Repair a BrokenWorld    3 sem. hrs.

This course investigates the social justice values of the biblical prophets, the Jewish mystical concept of Tikkun Olam (Repairing the World), and movements such as Zionism and Reform Judaism as responses to the brokenness of the world and as rationales for religiously motivated action. Students will deepen their understanding of theological anthropology. They will also apply these values to today's world and identify their own rationale for repairing the world. Cross-listed with JS 315. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 403  Evangelization and Catechesis    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the history of the Catholic catechesis from the early models of initiation to contemporary RCIA processes. Students will acquire deeper insight into the challenges and opportunities for religious education in the Twenty-First Century. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: THEO 106.

THEO 406  Theology Internship    1-6 sem. hrs.

The internship experience is mandatory for all Theology majors. The aim of the internship is to integrate theological theory and pastordal practice. It is a custom-designed internship with a wide variety of possible ministry venues. The internship is determined and arranged with the student's advisor. Offered every semester.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 408  Seminar: Topics in Theology    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines essential topics in theological studies, for example, the mystery of suffering, the development of doctrine, theological method, and Mariology. The chosen topic varies according to student and faculty interest. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 409  H3:Sem:Selected Theologians    3 sem. hrs.

This course is devoted to exploring the work of a designated theologian from the Judeo-Christian tradition. It is exegetical in nature and investigates primary themes within the theologian's literary oeuvre. The specific theologian is determined according to student and faculty interest. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: THEO 106.

THEO 579  Christology and the Trinity    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the person, being and activity of Jesus of Nazareth in depth through an examination of biblical testimonies, early Church Councils, and contemporary theological methods. Students will integrate Christology with Trinitarian theology and pneumatology, especially as these relate to salvation history. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: Must be a junior or senior in the B.A./M.A. Theology program.

THEO 580  Catholic Moral Life    3 sem. hrs.

With an eye toward the roles, responsibilities and concerns of lay ecclesial leaders of the Church in the modern world, this course explores fundamental categories, methods, concepts and norms used in moral theology to analyze and evaluate human moral experience (individual and social) and to address central questions of Christian theological ethics. Topics include the use of Scripture, Tradition, and experience as foundational sources in moral theology; the Church as locus for Christian moral life; the connection of worship and spirituality with the Christian moral life; the relation between Christian ethics and theological understandings of freedom, conscience, authority, character, sin, grace and responsibility; and application of moral analysis to selected contemporary moral issues (personal, professional and social). Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: Must be a junior or senior in the B.A./M.A. Theology program.

THEO 581  Ecclesiology    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the identity, nature, and mission of the Church through an integrative study of divine revelation, magisterial pronouncements, constructive theology, history and the social sciences. Students will engage all of these perspectives in critical dialogue with their own experience and vocation. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: Must be a juior or senior in the B.A./M.A. Theology program.

THEO 600  Spec Topics in Ecclesial Lead    2,3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the faith experience of the Christian community, grounding contemporary ecclesial leadership in a theological tradition and enabling lay ecclesial leaders to respond effectively to a wide range of needs in today's world.

THEO 610  Spec Topics in Moral Theology    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the historical development and contemporary discussion of a specific moral issue of special concern (to be announced) for lay ecclesial leaders in the Church in the modern world.

THEO 620  Spec Topics in App Pract Theo    2,3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore those areas of practical theology that engage the contemporary ecclesial leader in specific pastoral and leadership roles.

THEO 630  Special Topics in Scripture    2,3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore specific biblical themes that may be of special concern or interest in grounding a lay ecclesial leaders knowledge and skills in pastoral care and leadership.

THEO 631  Cetechesis    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the theory, practice, and assessment of Christian instruction by surveying emerging models and approaches to faith transformation. The reading assignments and presentations will point to texts, journals, web sites and parishes that provide and practice the models described. The course will encourage converstation and mutual learning about all approaches to parish faith formation across the life span with the goal of assisting all who bear this repsonsibility. This course is administered by the Josephimun Diaconate Institute (online).

THEO 640  Special Topics in Theology    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore specific theological areas that may be of special concern or interest.

THEO 651  Parish Administration    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores civil, legal and financial issues face by the parish. Topics addressed include: overview of civil law, contracts, negligence and premise liability: land use and zoning, employment law, worker’s compensation and unemployment compensation; civil law regarding marriages and families, festivals, Bingo; casinos and liquor liability, tax exempt status; confidentiality/privileged communication; protection of children, and financial management. Students will be asked to review and analyze published case decisions. This course is administered by the Josephinum Diaconate Institute (online).

THEO 670  Catholic Tradition    3 sem. hrs.

This course closely examines selected theologians, controversies, and movements within the two thousand-year history of the Catholic Church. Special emphasis is placed upon the interpretation of seminal historical texts and the retrieval of traditional prayers and devotions for the Christian life today.

THEO 676  Lay Ecclesial Leadership    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines significant changes taking place in the theology and praxis of lay leadership in the life and ministry of the Church. Students will critically evaluate the foundational theology, spirituality, leadership skills and organizational developments necessary for laypeople to advance the Church’s identity and mission in today’s world.

THEO 677  Dynamics of Theology    3 sem. hrs.

This course reflects on the Christian experience of God reflected within the context of a faith community. It examines the concepts of revelation, faith, scripture, tradition, and the symbolic nature of theology in light of the theological tradition of the church and the cultural setting in which the praxis of ministry occurs.

THEO 678  Biblical & Theological Themes    3 sem. hrs.

This course will guide students' existing familiarity with Hebrew Scriptures and New Testament by studying, discussing, and critiquing the theological and fundamental themes that form the narratives of the Hebrew Scriptures and the New Testament texts.

THEO 679  Christology and the Trinity    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the person, being and activity of Jesus of Nazareth in depth through an examination of biblical testimonies, early Church Councils, and contemporary theological methods. Students will integrate Christology with Trinitarian theology and pneumatology, especially as these relate to salvation history. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: Must be a junior or senior in the B.A./M.A. Theology program.

THEO 680  Catholic Moral Life    3 sem. hrs.

With an eye toward the roles, responsibilities and concerns of lay ecclesial leaders of the Church in the modern world, this course explores fundamental categories, methods, concepts and norms used in moral theology to analyze and evaluate human moral experience (individual and social) and to address central questions of Christian theological ethics. Topics include the use of Scripture, Tradition, and experience as foundational sources in moral theology; the Church as locus for Christian moral life; the connection of worship and spirituality with the Christian moral life; the relation between Christian ethics and theological understandings of freedom, conscience, authority, character, sin, grace and responsibility; and application of moral analysis to selected contemporary moral issues (personal, professional and social). Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: Must be a junior or senior in the B.A./M.A. Theology program.

THEO 681  Ecclesiology    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the identity, nature, and mission of the Church through an integrative study of divine revelation, magisterial pronouncements, constructive theology, history and the social sciences. Students will engage all of these perspectives in critical dialogue with their own experience and vocation. Offered as needed.

Prerequisite: Must be a juior or senior in the B.A./M.A. Theology program.

THEO 682  Old Testament Scriptures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literature and theology of the Old Testament: the Pentateuch, the Histories, the Poetical/Wisdom books, and the Prophets, including the Deutero-canonical literature unique to the Catholic Bible. Students will read the Old Testament in the context of the historiographic, cultural and intellectual traditions of ancient Near Eastern civilization with special attention to how the biblical authors creatively appropriated and transformed those traditions. Students will also analyze canon formation as a hermeneutical process expressing thecovenantal community’s ongoing dialogue with God and history. Students will integrate their insights with Catholic biblical hermeneutics and the Church’s dogmatic constitution on divine revelation.

THEO 683  New Testament Scriptures    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the literature and theology of the New Testament: the Gospels and Acts, the Epistles, and the Apocalypse of John. Students will read the New Testament within the historical, cultural and intellectual contexts of Early Judaism and Greco-Roman civilization, with special attention to how the inspired authors interpreted the life, death and resurrection of Jesus within the framework of the Old Testament. Students will integrate their insights with Catholic biblicalhermeneutics and the Church’s dogmatic constitution on divine revelation.

THEO 684  CPE: Eccl Leader/Pastoral Care    3 sem. hrs.

This course is an action/reflection process of theological education grounded in a person-centered approach to pastoral ministry. As a member of an interdisciplinary healthcare team, the student's education experience involves providing pastoral care to patients, families and staff at a local health care facility. In an interfaith peer group and in consulation with a certified ACPE Supervisor, students evaluate the effectiveness of his or her style of ministry in relation to theological perspective, religious tradition, the behavioral sciences and the pastoral needs of the person ministered to. Each participant develops an individualized contract for learning. Learning needs are taken into account in the development for the curriculum. This course is adminstered by the St. Vincent Charity Medical Center in Cleveland. (Standards 309.1, 309.2, 309.3, 311.1, 311.2, 311.3, 312.1, 309.9, 309.10, 311.8, 311.9, 312.7, and 312.8)

THEO 685  CPE:Pastoral Form Eccl Lead    3 sem. hrs.

The second unit will focus on Pastoral Formation and a basic understanding of behavioral concepts. It will build on some of the exercises from the first unit on theological reflection and pastoral identity. The student will examine his/her choices from movement into ministry and the process of developing resources to articulate faith, spirituality and religious beliefs. The educational exercises and discussions will include Motivation for Ministry, Spiritual Pilgrimage, Communication and Talking with a Patient about God and Faith, with the focus and exploratin on personal development as the core behavioral concept. (Standard 240.3, 240.5, 252.1, 252.5, and 252.6)

THEO 686  CPE:Eccl Lead as Prof Minister    3 sem. hrs.

The third unit will focus upon Competence in Pastoral Functioning. With the goal of greater professional functioning by the student, the program will offer structures to help conceptualize pastoral care and its professional tasks by writing a Theory of Pastoral Care Paper. Building again on what has come before. The themes will center on further professional growth in the areas of Pastoral Assessment, Development of Technique, and Group Dynamics with a focus on ethical perspectives and Advanced Conceptualization in Pastoral Care and Counseling. (Standard 240.1, 240.7, 240.8, 240.10, 252.4)

THEO 690  Spiritual Formation    3 sem. hrs.

This course examines the major Christian spiritual traditions. In addition to exploring the Christian experience of the Holy Spirit in Sacred Scripture, the early Church Fathers, saints and spiritual masters, students will develop a rule of life for themselves that is tailored to their own level of conversion, personality, vocation and abilities.

THEO 691  Liturgy and Sacraments    3 sem. hrs.

This course studies Christian liturgy and the Sacraments as signs and instruments of divine grace in the life of the Church. By reflecting on the source and summit of Christian life, students will identify the ethical dimensions of pastoral care and ministry for today’s lay ecclesial leader.

THEO 700  Project Seminar    1,3 sem. hrs.

All students who will be taking THEO 701 or THEO 702 are required to participate in the seminar. Ordinarily, this will be taken prior to beginning the Culminating Assignment. The seminar will promote the integration of theory and practice as well as collaboration and partnership in developing ecclesial leadership praxis. The nature of the seminar is to integrate pastorally what the student has learned academically throughout their courses. In conjunction with the seminar, a student is expected to prepare a reflection paper that exhibits a growing ability to integrate the theology and practice within a particular context of ecclesial leadership. Discussions and group work are directed toward either a final ministry project or a final integrating thesis involving a significant contribution to the students' ecclesial context or the wider community. Participation in the seminar will involve an assessment by members of the faculty. The Director of the Master's Program oversees the seminar. Completion of this seminar involves successful preparation of an acceptable final comprehensive project or thesis in a selected area of ecclesial leadership, attesting to the student's successful integration of theological knowledge and pastoral/professional expertise with its appropriate application.

THEO 701  Integration Project    3,6 sem. hrs.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Theology degree include completing of an Integration Project or Integration Thesis, normally in the last semester of the degree program. The project/thesis assists the student in integrating various foundational and elected courses within the program with the past, present, and future ecclesial leadership role/ministerial context of the students. Students develop the project/thesis using the particular interest or emphasis that has been identified within the seminar and which has been supported throughout the course of study. This culiminating assignment is intended to foster an internalized appropriation of the foundational doctrines of the Church in a way that relates them to Christian life and ecclesial leadership. Weekly small group work will help develop the skills necessary for sound theological and ecclesial/ministerial judgment, promoting integration of theory and practice as well as formation for collaboration and partnership in lay ecclesial leadership settings. Through discussions, ground work, and a specific project/thesis involving a contribution to the wider community, (e.g., related to social justice, spiritual renewal, education and formation, pastoral administration or pastoral care), students will demonstrate in a structured format the ability to articulate, exercise and apply the skills and knowledge acquired during the degree program. Typically a paper of approximately 45-60 pages is required. Students should present a substantive, well crafted and focused project that is of significant pastoral interest. The student will demonstrate competence in a special area of subject, chosen in consultation with a major advisor. The student's focus will be an in-depth problem rather than several broad problems. The completed project/thesis will reflect the student's graduate-level ability for in-depth research and will include:1) Scholarly exposition of appropriate primary and secondary literature, 2) Informed, critical analysis of major issues involved, and 3) Thoughtful and academically defensible disclosure reflecting the student's position on the chosen research question.Although the project/thesis format may vary according to the nature of the topic to be explored, scholarly and academic standards are expected throughout. The student is not expected to conduct research with the expansive rigor of a doctoral dissertation. However, he or she is expected to demonstrate both familiarity with scholarly literature and growing expertise in the chosen area. The student will be responsible for proofreading the final work, checking for clear grammar, academically appropriate style, expressing oneself clearly and effectively, and exploring abstract thinking. The last component of the Culminating Assignment is a one-hour oral qualifying exam/discussion with a panel of tree examiners. The work signifies that through this project/thesis and this discussion, one has developed an integrated framework in ecclesial leadership praxis.

THEO 702  Integration Thesis    3-6 sem. hrs.

Requirements for the Master of Arts in Theology degree include completing of an Integration Project or Integration Thesis, normally in the last semester of the degree program. The project/thesis assists the student in integrating various foundational and elected courses within the program with the past, present, and future ecclesial leadership role/ministerial context of the students. Students develop the project/thesis using the particular interest or emphasis that has been identified within the seminar and which has been supported throughout the course of study. This culiminating assignment is intended to foster an internalized appropriation of the foundational doctrines of the Church in a way that relates them to Christian life and ecclesial leadership. Weekly small group work will help develop the skills necessary for sound theological and ecclesial/ministerial judgment, promoting integration of theory and practice as well as formation for collaboration and partnership in lay ecclesial leadership settings. Through discussions, ground work, and a specific project/thesis involving a contribution to the wider community, (e.g., related to social justice, spiritual renewal, education and formation, pastoral administration or pastoral care), students will demonstrate in a structured format the ability to articulate, exercise and apply the skills and knowledge acquired during the degree program. Typically a paper of approximately 45-60 pages is required. Students should present a substantive, well crafted and focused project that is of significant pastoral interest. The student will demonstrate competence in a special area of subject, chosen in consultation with a major advisor. The student's focus will be an in-depth problem rather than several broad problems. The completed project/thesis will reflect the student's graduate-level ability for in-depth research and will include:1) Scholarly exposition of appropriate primary and secondary literature, 2) Informed, critical analysis of major issues involved, and 3) Thoughtful and academically defensible disclosure reflecting the student's position on the chosen research question.Although the project/thesis format may vary according to the nature of the topic to be explored, scholarly and academic standards are expected throughout. The student is not expected to conduct research with the expansive rigor of a doctoral dissertation. However, he or she is expected to demonstrate both familiarity with scholarly literature and growing expertise in the chosen area. The student will be responsible for proofreading the final work, checking for clear grammar, academically appropriate style, expressing oneself clearly and effectively, and exploring abstract thinking. The last component of the Culminating Assignment is a one-hour oral qualifying exam/discussion with a panel of tree examiners. The work signifies that through this project/thesis and this discussion, one has developed an integrated framework in ecclesial leadership praxis.

THEO 703  CPE:Inter Past Care Eccl Leade    3 sem. hrs.

The final unit will strive to facilitate Integration. The themes as well as the program schedule will be planned in part by the Students. Two focused presentations will be Perspectives of Pastoral Care Leadership and Group Dynamics. Activities will help students to think about their learning and plan for their future professional roles as laity, vowed religious, ministers, priests and rabbis. (Standard 240.9, 241.1, 241.2, 241.3, 252.8)