Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 100  Introduction to Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for students who have had little or no chemistry experience prior to attending Walsh. This course is mandatory for nursing-intended students who place in CHEM 100 following completion of the chemistry placement exam. This course provides the concepts and basic skill sets to help prepare students for Chem 109. Topics include the metric system; units; significant figures; factor-label calculations; density; atoms, molecules and ions; basic nomenclature of inorganic salts; balancing chemical reactions; mass-mole relationships; basic algebra; logarithms; basics of acid-base chemistry; basic chemical bonding; and an introduction to Lewis structures and VSEPR geometries. The course is taught at a pace to enable substantial repetition and skill development. The course is problem-solving intensive and all students must have a basic scientific calculator. A grade of C- or better in this course is required to enroll in CHEM 109. Offered every fall and spring semester.

CHEM 101  T1: Principles of Chemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

Principles of Chemistry I is designed to help students learn key concepts with skills in chemistry including data management; atoms, molecules and ions; chemical reactions and stoichiometry, gas behavior; thermochemistry, atomic theory & quantum mechanics, and chemical bonding. The course is taught using a combination of interactive lecture, chemical & multi-media demonstrations, group dynamics and problem solving. This course is intended for students who are chemistry or biology majors or education majors with a concentration in the sciences. Consequently, placement beyond MATH 104 is required, and a strong background in high school chemistry is very helpful. This course is offered every Fall semester. Taking the lab in conjunction with the course is highly recommended. 3 hours of lecture and one 3 hour lab per week. This course is offered every fall semester.

CHEM 101L  Principles of Chemistry I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to compliment Chem 101 lecture. A strong focus is placed on proper methods for measuring data (mass, volume, length, etc...), proper use of significant figures; basic statistical methods; graphing and data presentation; laboratory safety and proper scientific report writing. Experiments include, but are not limited to, determination of densities of materials; gravimetric analysis; volumetric analysis (acid-base titrations, etc...); quantitative analysis using spectrophotometry; calorimetry and other labs as time permits. For most experiments, students work independently, but teamwork is also encouraged in certain situations. One 3-hour lab period per week. Offered every fall semester.

CHEM 102  Principles of Chemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

Principles of Chemistry II continues to build on POC I. Topics include chemical bonding, molecular geometry, solution chemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, complex ions, thermodynamic state functions, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. This course emphasizes the integrated nature of chemistry and provides numerous practical applications of chemistry in materials science, medicine, pharmaceuticals and food science. A working knowledge of basic algebra, logarithms, and graphing is vital. Taking the lab in conjunction with the course is highly recommended. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CHEM 101 with a C- or better.

CHEM 102L  Principles of Chemistry II:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to compliment Chem 102 lecture. A strong focus is placed on proper methods for measuring data (mass, volume, length, etc...), proper use of significant figures, basic statistical methods, graphing and data presentation, laboratory safety and proper scientific report writing. Experiments include, but are not limited to, thin-layer chromatography of pharamaceuticals, colligative properties of solutions; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium; electrochemistry; more complex volumetric analysis; and qualitative chemical analysis. For most experiments, students work independently, but teamwork is also encoraged in certain situations. A greater emphasis is placed on exploratory and investigative science during this course. One 3-hour lab per week. Offered every spring semester.

CHEM 109  T1:Gen Org/Biochem I    3 sem. hrs.

This course is specifically designed for students intending to pursue careers in nursing and related fields. This first course focuses on inorganic chemistry or general chemistry. Topics include: measurements; significant figures; metric system; units; density; atoms, molecules and ions; basic nomenclature of inorganic salts and simple diatomic covalent molecules; balancing chemical reactions; stoichiometry (mass-mole relationships); basic gas laws; basics of thermodynamics; acid-base chemistry; basics of chemical kinetics; basics of chemical equilibrium; periodic table; basics of chemical bonding; Lewis structures and VSEPR geometries; and basic of nuclear chemistry. A working knowledge of basic math including simple algebra is needed. This course is calculation intensive. All students need a scientific calculator. Successful completion of the Chem 100 placement exam is needed to enter this course. Taking the lab course (Chem 109L) in conjunction with this lecture course is highly recommended. A grade of C or better is required to enroll in CHEM 110. This course does not count toward the Chemistry or Biology major. Offered during fall, spring, and in summer I session every year.

CHEM 109L  Gen Org/Biochem I/Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to compliment Chem 109 lecture. A strong focus is placed on proper methods for measuring data (mass, volume, length, etc...), proper use of significant figures; basic statistical methods; graphing and data presentation; laboratory safety and proper scientific report writing. Experiments include, but are not limited to, determination of densities of materials; basic gravimetric analysis; volumetric analysis (acid-base titrations, etc...); separation of mixtures; calorimetry and other labs as time permits. For most experiments, students work independently, but teamwork is also encouraged in certain situations. Offered in the fall, spring, and summer I session every year.

CHEM 110  Gen Org/Biochem II    3 sem. hrs.

This course is specifically designed for students intending to pursue careers in nursing and related fields. This course focuses on basic organic chemistry and fundamental biochemistry. Topics include Lewis structures, physical properties, basic nomenclature, and chemical reactions of the following classes of organic compounds: hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, alkynes & aromatics), alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, ester, amides, anhydrides, phosphoesters, thioesters, thioalcohols, and amines. Stereochemistry and acid-base topics are also included. The second half of the course applies the organic chemistry to biochemicals with an emphasis on health-related applications. Topics include: amino acids & proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, vitamins and coenzymes, basic metabolism. Clinical topics include, but are not limited to, diabetes, mellitus, clinical isoenzymes, lipoprotein profiles, drug therapies, ethanol metabolism, and others. This course is an organic chemical structure-intensive experience emphasizing structure-function relationships, monomer-polymer relationships and metabolic control systems and disease. Successful completion of Chem 109 is needed to enter this course. This course does not count toward a chemistry or biology major. Taking the lab course (Chem 110L) in conjunction with this lecture course is highly recommended. Normally offered during fall, spring, and summer II sessions every year.

CHEM 110L  Gen Org/Biochem II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 110 lecture. Experiments are designed to introduce students to the behavior of organic molecules and with an emphasis on biomolecules. Functional group identification, the chemical properties of amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids are investigated. Clinical, nutritional and medical applications are stressed. Offered in fall, spring, and in summer II session every year. One 3-hour lab period per week.

CHEM 198  Chem Career Seminar IA    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involvinga once weekly meeting to explore the careers in chemistry. This seminaris for chemistry majors. Offered every fall semester.

CHEM 199  Chem Careers Seminar 1B    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involvinga once weekly meeting to explore the careers in chemistry. This seminaris for chemistry majors. Offered every spring semester.

CHEM 200  Aspects of Clinical Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of organic chemistry and biochemistry are used to examine chemical basis for a variety of prevalent clinical disorders. Topics include basic organic chemistry, bioorganic reactions, basic biochemistry, metabolism of ethanol, chemical basis of the evaluation of thyroid function, biochemistry of diabetes mellitus, sickle cell anemia, phenylketonuria and related enzyme defects, chemical basis for enzyme assays (CK, LDH, AST) in cardiac assessment, and other pertinent topics. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: CHEM 100 or equivalent.

CHEM 200L  Aspects of Clinical Chem:Lab    1 sem. hr.

CHEM 201  Organic Chemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

Fundamental concepts of molecular orbital theory, thermodynamics, kinetics, and acid-base chemistry are introduced and used to develop basis for resonance theory, nucleophile-electrophile concept, and functional group-reactivity relationships. Chemistry of alkanes, cycloalkanes, organohalides, and alcohols is investigated. Stereochemistry mechanism analysis and organic synthesis are integrated from mid-semester. First semester of two semester sequence. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: Chem 101, 102, CHEM 101L, 102L, all with a grade of "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: CHEM 201L.

CHEM 201L  Organic Chemistry I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Melting point determination, distillation, recrystallization, extraction, thin layer chromatography, and fundamentals of synthesis are introduced during the lab along with introduction to IR, MS, and NMR. First semester of two semester sequence. Offered every fall semester.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 102, CHEM 101L, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: CHEM 201.

CHEM 202  Organic Chemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

Principles introduced in Organic Chemistry I are used to study chemistry of alkenes, dienes, alkynes, aromatic compounds, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and derivatives, amines, and heterocyclics. Molecular spectroscopy (NMR, IR, UV-VIS and Raman) are integrated throughout and synthetic and mechanistic chemistry emphasized. Second semester of two semester sequence. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisite: CHEM 201 and 201L, both with "C-" or better.

Corequisite: CHEM 202L.

CHEM 202L  Organic Chemistry II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Planning and performance of organic syntheses and verification of molecular structure using IR, MS, and NMR, and various chemical tests are presented in the lab. One four-hour lab per week. Second semester of two semester sequence. Pre-requisite: CHEM 201 and CHEM 201L, both "C-" or better. Offered every spring semester.

Corequisite: CHEM 202.

CHEM 206  Org Chem for Env Science    4 sem. hrs.

This course will introduce fundamentals of Organic Chemistry in the context of environmental applications. Students will learn organic functional groups, naturally occurring organic molecules and synthetics with environmental implications. The majority of the course will be focused on learning about organic chemicals with environmental impact, how we detect these compounds, MSDS data and the importance of responsible management of organic chemicals in consumer products and industry. Offered every spring semester beginning spring 2017.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L and BIO 101, 101L, 102, 102L, and MATH 104.

CHEM 298  Chemistry Seminar IIA    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involving a once weekly meeting to learn from professional chemists, explore internship options and discuss real-world applications of chemistry. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every fall semester.

CHEM 299  Chemistry Seminar IIA    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) learning experience involving a once weekly meeting to learn from professional chemists, explore internship options and discuss real-world applications of chemistry. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every spring semester.

CHEM 301  Quantitative Analysis    3 sem. hrs.

Introduction to the use of statistics in chemistry along with the studyof gravimetric and volumetric methods of analysis are presented. Principlesand applications of chemical equilibria, acid-base reactions, solubilityand precipitation, complexion formation, and redox reactions are covered. Pre-requisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 301L.

CHEM 301L  Quantitative Analysis: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Statistical analyses are performed and presented. The studies of gravimetricand volumetric methods of analysis are practiced. Creating acid-base, metal, and EDTA titration curves are also practiced. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 301.

CHEM 302  Instrumental Analysis    3 sem. hrs.

Theoretical and practical principles of chemical analysis involving useof electronics, atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, and separationmethods are discussed. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 302L.

CHEM 302L  Instrumental Analysis: Lab    1 sem. hr.

Theoretical and practical principles of chemical analysis involving useof electronics, atomic spectroscopy, molecular spectroscopy, and separationmethods are practiced. This course will no longer be offered following the 2015-2016 academic year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, all "C-" or better.

Co-requisite: PHYS 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 302.

CHEM 303  Modern Analytical Chem    3 sem. hrs.

This course will focus on classical and modern methods of chemical analysis. Data management, “wet” methods and instrumental methods of analysis will be explored with applications in various areas of chemistry including materials science, organic synthesis, structure characterizations, and many others. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L, CHEM 206 and 206L for Environmental Chemistry Majors.

CHEM 303L  Modern Analytical Chem Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab will complement the CHEM 303 course and will involve hands on experience with gravimetric, volumetric and instrumental methods of analysis in chemical problem solving. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L, CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L, CHEM 206 and 206L for Environmental Chemistry Majors.

CHEM 305  Inorganic Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course presents fundamental theories and applications of the chemistry of inorganic compounds, particularly the main-group elements. Topics include VSEPR theory, molecular symmetry and group theory, theories in chemical bonding, chemistry of the main-group elements, spectroscopic and analytical methods, coordination chemistry, crystal field theory, inorganic polymers, solid state chemistry, solution chemistry, and organometallic chemistry and green inorganic chemistry. Course also includes an oral and writing component and considerable integration of research literature. Students are expected to read, abstract, and present current topics in inorganic chemistry. Offered spring of every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 with a C- or better grade.

CHEM 305L  Inorganic Chemistry:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 305 lecture. The focus is the manipulation and synthesis of inorganic compounds. Topics include the chemistry of phosphazenes, silanes, materials chemistry, and inorganic polymers. Students will gain knowledge of anaerobic techniques for air-sensitive compounds. Offered spring of every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisite: CHEM 201-202 with a C- or better grade.

CHEM 307  Essential Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the structure, chemistry and biological functions of some of the primary biomolecules: proteins, lipids, saccharides, nucleic acids, and vitamins & coenzymes. The course then focuses on fundamentals of enzymology, central catabolic metabolism and key features of biochemical regulation and integration. Applications of biochemistry in medicine and pharmaceuticals are also emphasized.The course is taught using a combination of interactive lecture, demonstrations and group activities. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201-202, BIO 306 is helpful.

CHEM 307L  Essential Biochemistry:Lab    1 sem. hr.

CHEM 310  Found of Physical Chem    4 sem. hrs.

This course will explore classical concepts in thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, kinetics and equilibrium.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101-102 and labs, CHEM 201-202 and labs and Calculus I and II.

CHEM 320  Biochemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

This course explores the chemistry of biological compounds that include amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, vitamins, and nucleic acids with an emphasis on their structure-function relationships. Protein structure and biosynthesis, enzymes kinetics and mechanisms, and biological membranes are covered in detail. This course is required for Biochemistry majors and most pre-pharmacy students. All pre-professional students, biology majors and chemistry majors are welcome to enroll. Cross-listed as BIO 320. Offered every fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201, 202.

CHEM 320L  Biochemistry I:Lab    1 sem. hr.

This laboratory course is designed to introduce the students to modern biochemical experimental methods for studying the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Experiments will include the use of buffers, spectroscopy, enzyme assays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoassays in the analysis of biological macromolecules. Isolation and purification techniques will be emphasized along with quantitative procedures. Students will be expected to keep a professional quality research notebook, read biochemical research articles and complete experimental work weekly. Cross-listed as BIO 320L. It is highly recommended that students enroll in BIO 320/CHEM 320 simultaneously. Offered every fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L.

CHEM 321  Biochemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

This course is a continuation of CHEM 320 course with an emphasis on the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in physiological systems. The metabolic pathways are examined from an integrated thermodynamic and kinetic regulatory perspective. Cellular signaling, metabolic disorders, and the role of ATP, and its production are fully considered. Applications of biochemistry in medicine and pharmaceuticals are also emphasized. Special discussion is placed on important biochemistry research topics during the latter part of the semester forwhich much material is drawn from the current biochemical literature. This course provides the linkage between the inanimate world of molecular biochemistry and the living world of biology. This course is required for Biochemistry majors and most pre-pharmacy students. All pre-professional students, biology majors and chemistry majors are welcome to enroll. Cross-listed as BIO 321. Offered every spring semester on even numbered years.

Prerequisites: CHEM 320.

CHEM 321L  Biochemistry II:Lab    1 sem. hr.

An extension of BIO 320/CHEM 320 lab, this laboratory course is designed to continue introducing the students to modern biochemical experimental methods for studying the chemical and physical properties of biological molecules. Experiments will include the use of buffers, spectroscopy, enzyme assays, chromatography, electrophoresis, and immunoassays in the analysis of biological macromolecules. Isolation and purification techniques will be emphasized along with quantitativeprocedures. Students will be expected to keep a professional quality research notebook, read biochemical research articles and complete experimental work weekly. Cross-listed as BIO 321L. It is highly recommended that students enroll in BIO 321/CHEM 321 simultaneously. Offered every spring semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO 320/CHEM 320 with lab.

CHEM 335  Biogeochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

The examination of the control and function of the Earth's global biogeochemical cycles. This course reviews the basic inorganic and organic chemistry of biologically significant elements, and then considers the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, and metals that take place in soils, sediments, rivers, the oceans and atmosphere. Recommended: NS 105. Offered fall semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 102, BIO 101, 102.

CHEM 390  DV:Chemistry Internship    1-3 sem. hrs.

This course offers credit for doing an internship in chemistry with our business partners. This seminar is for Chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semesters.

CHEM 398  Chemistry Seminar IIIA    1 sem. hr.

DV: This course offers credit for doing an internship in chemistry with our business partners. The students will choose a field and participate in an internship. This seminar is for Chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semesters.

CHEM 401  Physical Chemistry I    3 sem. hrs.

Study of the kinetic theory of gases and gas laws, thermodynamics, three laws of thermodynamics, heat, temperature, enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs energy and their relationships. The course focuses on Phase equilibria, thermodynamics of transition, phase diagrams, properties of mixtures, and deep emphasis on chemical equilibrium. Offered fall semester every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101-102, PHYS 101-102, MATH 207.

Corequisites: MATH 208 or MATH 307.

CHEM 401L  Physical Chemistry I: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 401 lecture. Experiments include verification of the ideal gas law by digital and U-tube manometers, determination of enthalpy utilizing oxygen bomb calorimeter, examination of equilibrium parameters by titration, and exploring the properties of mixtures and colligative properties. The lab focuses on analyzing research articles and discussing their significant points in order to correlate theories to applications. The students also present materials that demonstrate how the operation of biologicalsystems obeys theoretical physical laws. One four-hour session per week. Offered fall semester every odd-numbered year.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101-102,PHYS 101-102, MATH 207, Corequisites: MATH 208 or MATH 307.

CHEM 402  Physical Chemistry II    3 sem. hrs.

Study of quantum theories and chemical kinetics that includes rate laws, order, mechanism, and catalysis, and basics of atomic structure and molecular interactions. The course covers theories and applications on macromolecules and aggregates, molecular rotations and vibrations, electronic transition and photochemistry, and magnetic resonance. Offered spring semester every even-numbered year.

Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better grade) of CHEM 401.

CHEM 402L  Physical Chemistry II: Lab    1 sem. hr.

The lab experience is designed to complement CHEM 402 lecture. Experiments include verification of Beer's law and determination of rate law using UV-Vis spectrometer, studying colloids and surface chemistry, practical and biological applications utilizing Fluorescence, Phosphorescence, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopic techniques. The lab also focuseson analyzing research articles related to Infra-red and laser techniques in order to correlate theories to applications. One four-hour lab per week. Offered spring semester every even-numbered year.

Prerequisite: Successful completion (C or better grade) of CHEM 401 lab.

CHEM 403  Clinical Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Clinical Biochemistry is concerned with the detection and measurement of biochemical changes in disease. This course focuses on the areas of body function required for the maintenance of health including: carbohydrates metabolism, transport and storage of lipids and lipoproteins, acid-base balance and blood gases as well as control of water and electrolytes and kidney function. Genetic control is covered with an emphasis on endocrinology including thyroid hormones. The course also includes a discussion of digestion, nutrition, and drugs, in addition to, liver function, relevant enzymology and the immune system. This course is suitable for students interested in careers in biochemistry, chemistry, biology, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and veterinary. Cross-listed as BIO 403 Offered every fall semester on even-numbered years.

Prerequisites: BIO/CHEM 320, BIO/CHEM 321 or BIO/CHEM 307.

CHEM 403L  Biochemistry I:Lab    1 sem. hr.

CHEM 404  Physical Biochemistry    3 sem. hrs.

Physical Biochemistry aims at understanding biological systems and processes in terms of the underlying physical and chemical laws. The course quantitatively investigates the interactions, dynamics, and structure of biological molecules at the molecular level in terms of kinetics, thermodynamics, spatio-temporal organization. Cross-listed as BIO 404. Offered every spring semester on odd-numbered years.

Prerequisite: MATH 207.

Corequisite: MATH 207.

CHEM 405  Topics in Chemistry    3,4 sem. hrs.

These courses are not part of the Division’s normal course sequence and are offered by faculty in their areas of specialization. Course topics include: Quantum Mechanics, Chromatography, Advanced Organic Chemistry, Advanced Laboratory Methods, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, Green Chemistry, Molecular Modeling and others. Check course offerings in any given semester for these classes. Prerequisites vary and enrollment requires permission of advisor or Division Chair.

CHEM 407  Molecular Pharmacology    3 sem. hrs.

This course deals with the biochemistry and physiology of drugs and their effects on living systems. As is the case with the science of pharmacology, the interactions of drugs with cellular targets are used as a means to understand normal cellular functions. We will deal with common over-the counter medications, prescription medications, antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, drugs of abuse, and new approaches to drug therapy. Three hours of lecture per week. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: BIO 209, 210, CHEM 201, 202.

CHEM 411  Introduction to Research    1,2 sem. hrs.

Intended for advanced students, course includes methods for searching the chemical literature and using the library. A two-semester research project will be discussed and assigned. Research projects typically involve advanced experimental work and submission of a paper. Projects are assigned with intent to produce publishable data and results. Permission of Division Chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs. A maximum of 2 credits can be applied to the CHEM major or minor. Offered every semester.

CHEM 412  Introduction to Research    1,2 sem. hrs.

Intended for advanced students, course includes methods for searchingthe chemical literature and using the library. A two-semester researchproject will be discussed and assigned. Research projects typically involveadvanced experimental work and submission of a paper. Projects are assigned with intent to produce publishable data and results. Permission of Division Chair. A maximum of 2 credits can be applied to the CHEM major or minor. Offered every semester.

CHEM 415L  Integrated Lab Experience I    2 sem. hrs.

The integrated laboratory experience is a project-based learning experiencein which chemistry majors will choose a problem to explore. Students will design and implement a project to attempt to solve the problem posed using a suite of chemical analytical tools available. The project will be extended over three semesters and will be done in conjunction with a faculty mentor. The deliverables will be a major report, a presentation on campus and possible a publishable artifact. Students will be encouraged to be creative to explore various analyticalsolutions to the problem posed and to meet with their peers regularlyto discuss progress and share ideas for ongoing work.

CHEM 416L  Integrated Laboratory Exp II    2 sem. hrs.

This course is the extension of CHEM 415L.

CHEM 417L  Integ Lab Experience III    2 sem. hrs.

This course is the extension of CHEM 416L.

CHEM 440  NMR Theory & Applications    3 sem. hrs.

This course emphasizes the fundamental aspects of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). The theory of pulsed Fourier transform NMR is presented using a conceptual nonmathematical approach. The course is geared toward an audience which seeks an understanding of NMR theory and an appreciation of the practical applications of NMR in chemical analysis. Students are exposed to hands-on NMR operation. Detailed instructions are provided and eachstudent is expected to carry out his or her own NMR experiments onour Anasazi EFT-60 NMR spectrometer.

CHEM 450  Environmental Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore methods of chemical analysis in environmentalapplications related to EPA standards, environmental toxicology, product safety issues and exposure limits. Offered every spring semester.

Prerequisites: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L.

CHEM 460  Materials Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore the chemistry and properties of materials used in a wide range of industrial and consumer applications. Topics will include polymers, hybrid materials, catalysts, metals and many others in the context of design strategies, testing and real-world use. Offered for the first time in 2016-2017.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L.

CHEM 470  Nano and Fuel Chemistry    3 sem. hrs.

This course will explore the chemistry and properties of materials used in the fuel industry with a focus on nano-technology applications. Offered for the first time in 2016-2017.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101, 101L, 102, 102L and CHEM 201, 201L, 202, 202L.

CHEM 498  Chemistry Career Seminar    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) capstone experience that will involve chemistry majors discussing, sharing and evaluating internship experiences as professional presentations. The focus in the course is on market readiness and job placement. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semester starting in fall 2016.

CHEM 499  Chemistry Career Seminar    0.5 sem. hrs.

A two semester (0.5 credits per semester) capstone experience that will involve chemistry majors discussing, sharing and evaluating internship experiences as professional presentations. The focus in the course is on market readiness and job placement. This seminar is for chemistry majors. Offered every fall and spring semester starting in fall 2016.